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Monday’s Daytona 500: Restart time, weather and more

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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Let’s try this again.

After rain postponed Sunday’s race, Cup drivers will get back on track Monday at Daytona International Speedway to complete the Daytona 500. And the forecast looks very good for Monday’s race.

The race was halted after 20 of 180 laps with Ricky Stenhouse Jr. leading.

Here are today’s details:

(All times are Eastern)

RESTART: Command to fire engines at 4:02 p.m. The green flag is scheduled to wave at 4:12 p.m. 

DISTANCE: 180 of the scheduled 200 laps remain to be run on the 2.5-mile speedway.

STAGES: Stage 1 ends on Lap 65. Stage 2 ends on Lap 130.

TV/RADIO: Fox’s broadcast begins at 4 p.m. Motor Racing Network’s broadcast begins at 4 p.m. and also can be heard on mrn.com. SiriusXM NASCAR Radio will carry MRN’s broadcast.

FORECAST: The wunderground.com forecast calls for partly cloudy skies with a high of 73 degrees and a 3% chance of rain when the race resumes.

RUNNING ORDER:

  1. Ricky Stenhouse Jr.
  2. Joey Logano
  3. Aric Almirola
  4. Ryan Newman
  5. Kevin Harvick
  6. Brad Keselowski
  7. William Byron
  8. Jimmie Johnson
  9. Ty Dillon
  10. Timmy Hill
  11. David Ragan
  12. Chris Buescher
  13. Matt DiBenedetto
  14. Chase Elliott
  15. Ross Chastain
  16. Alex Bowman
  17. Kyle Larson
  18. Kurt Busch
  19. Austin Dillon
  20. Cole Custer
  21. Michael McDowell
  22. Tyler Reddick
  23. Ryan Blaney
  24. Bubba Wallace
  25. Reed Sorenson
  26. BJ McLeod
  27. Corey LaJoie
  28. Brendan Gaughan
  29. Ryan Preece
  30. Justin Haley
  31. Martin Truex Jr.
  32. Kyle Busch
  33. Erik Jones
  34. Christopher Bell
  35. Denny Hamlin
  36. Clint Bowyer
  37. John Hunter Nemechek
  38. Quin Houff
  39. Joey Gase
  40. Brennan Poole

The 2020 Daytona 500 viewer’s guide: Five things to watch over 500 miles

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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Take a good look when the green flag falls for the 62nd running of the Daytona 500, because the Great American Race likely will appear quite different in 2021.

Next season will mark the debut of the NextGen car, a radical overhaul of the model that has been raced in NASCAR’s premier series for decades. The potential volatility of an unusually large group of stars in contract years could mean a dramatic reshuffling of the driver lineup for next season. And though next year’s Daytona 500 already has been announced its traditional mid-February slot (Feb. 14, 2021), the races that will follow it (or perhaps occur before) will form what’s expected to be an aggressive shake-up of the Cup schedule.

Those are three overarching topics in NASCAR entering the 2020 season that actually won’t be fully digested until well after the champion has been crowned.

But one thing remains static: The Daytona 500 is the biggest race of the season, and Daytona International Speedway will have anyone’s full attention for roughly three hours today.

Here are five things to watch over the next 500 miles of Cup racing.


Jimmie Johnson’s last ride: Feting the seven-time series champion will be a weekly occurrence during his final full season of an illustrious 19 years in the Cup Series, and Daytona International Speedway will kick off the celebration by putting Johnson’s No. 48 Chevrolet at the front during warmup laps. A special video tribute and highlight montage will be played, honoring the Hendrick Motorsports driver’s career with accolades from peers and teammates, and there also will be an extended salute during driver introductions.

It’s fitting to heap as much praise on Johnson as possible, considering many in NASCAR believe proper credit was lacking for his accomplishments and during an unprecedented run of five consecutive championship (notably, Johnson will remain overshadowed slightly Sunday by a visit from President Trump).

Of course, the ultimate homage would be in victory lane. It’s been more than two seasons and 95 races since his last victory, but Johnson is a two-time Daytona 500 winner and showed speed in finishing second to teammate William Byron in Thursday’s second qualifying race. Though speedway races haven’t been his forte, if he can avoid being caught in the predictable rash of wrecks, he should have as good of a shot as anyone at earning a memorable win.

NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson smiles during Daytona 500 Media Day (Stephen M. Dowell/Orlando Sentinel/Tribune News Service via Getty Images)

Blocking and big crashes: Speaking of wrecks, expect more of the same at the Daytona 500, which has been an annual demolition derby since 2017. Though drivers understand insanely higher closing rates (because of a taller spoiler) greatly have diminished the effectiveness of blocking, it won’t preclude overly optimistic moves that invariably will result in massive pileups (as in Sunday’s Busch Clash).

It’s the Daytona 500, which means every risk can be rationalized no matter how absurd and futile it might seem in retrospect.

Expect the action to be relatively tame (much like the bulk of Thursday’s qualifiers) through the first 160 laps. But over the final 100 miles, the gloves will come off, and many contenders will be left staggering.

And keep an eye on whether any more flareups involve teammates after the contretemps between Brad Keselowski and Joey Logano in the Clash.


Manufacturer alliances: Because it should be easier to charge toward the front with these rules, strength in numbers will be less important than a year ago (when Joe Gibbs Racing’s Toyotas cut a secret deal with Hendrick Motorsports’ Chevrolets to thwart the Ford armada). But the automakers have exuded their desire for cooperation among brands more strongly than ever over the past year at Daytona and Talladega, with Chevrolet finally getting its Camaros to work in line with the Camrys and Mustangs.

Those dynamics will change as the laps wind down, but at least through the first two stages, expect drafting partners to be chosen strictly across manufacturer lines.

However, within the last 40 laps, expect to see surges regardless of their brands by the drivers remaining who are most skilled at superspeedway racing (with Denny Hamlin, Chase Elliott, Keselowski and Logano being among the first tier, and Clint Bowyer, Kevin Harvick, Ryan Blaney and Kurt Busch being in the conversation after that).


(Photo by Jeff Robinson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

The champ seeks another crown: NASCAR has been at Daytona International Speedway barely a week, but its resident champion has been making headlines here since the start of the year.

From the moment Kyle Busch climbed into a Lexus during a Jan. 3 test for his Rolex 24 debut, he has carried a noticeable spring in his step at the World Center of Racing.

Undoubtedly, he feels the confidence borne of emerging from one of his most frustrating seasons in Cup with a second title, which surely makes his first Daytona 500 win (in his 15th attempt) seem even more attainable.

His record at the 2.5-mile track is spotty – a lone victory in the July 2008 race – but he finished a career-best second in last year’s season opener. A stat buff who is aware of the many stock-car greats who never won here or needed double-digit tries, Busch has all the necessary motivation to marry with the swagger.


First timers and dark horses: This season’s vaunted trio of rookies (Christopher Bell, Cole Custer and Tyler Reddick) comprise the best freshman class in Cup since 2006 (Hamlin, Bowyer and Martin Truex Jr.), and any of them could pull the biggest Daytona 500 stunner since Trevor Bayne’s 2011 victory.

The same is true for a familiar collection of youth and veterans who have a skillset well-suited for superspeedways. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Chris Buescher, Aric Almirola, Ryan Preece and Matt DiBenedetto (now driving for Wood Brothers Racing’s storied No. 21, which has a long history at Daytona and is on the cusp of its 100th victory) don’t get mentioned often as Cup contenders but can’t be overlooked at Daytona.

Michael McDowell, David Ragan and Bubba Wallace are driving for midpack teams but aren’t necessarily long shots in this race.

(Photo by Brian Lawdermilk/Getty Images)

Cup Series paint schemes for 2020

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NASCAR’s Speedweeks has arrived and with it comes the first look at some of the paint schemes Cup Series teams will sport throughout the season.

Here’s a look at confirmed paint schemes for this year, including those that will be driven in Sunday’s Daytona 500 (2:30 p.m. ET on Fox).

Quin Houff – StarCom Racing’s No. 00 Chevrolet

StarCom Racing

Kurt Busch – Chip Ganassi Racing’s No. 1 Chevrolet

(Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

 

Chip Ganassi Racing

Brad Keselowski – Team Penske’s No. 2 Ford

Team Penske
Team Penske

Austin Dillon – Richard Childress Racing’s No. 3 Ford

Richard Childress Racing

Kevin Harvick – Stewart-Haas Racing’s No. 4 Ford

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Ryan Newman – Roush Fenway Racing’s No. 6 Ford

Roush Fenway Racing
Roush Fenway Racing

Tyler Reddick – Richard Childress Racing’s No. 8 Chevrolet

(Photo by Jeff Robinson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Chase Elliott – Hendrick Motorsports’ No. 9 Chevrolet

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
Hendrick Motorsports
Hendrick Motorsports

 

Hendrick Motorsports

Aric Almirola – Stewart-Haas Racing’s No. 10 Ford

Stewart-Haas Racing

Denny Hamlin – Joe Gibbs Racing’s No. 11 Toyota

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Ryan Blaney – Team Penske’s No. 12 Ford

Team Penske
(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

 

Ty Dillon – Germain Racing’s No. 13 Chevrolet

Germain Racing

Clint Bowyer – Stewart-Haas Racing’s No. 14 Ford

Stewart-Haas Racing
(Photo by Jeff Robinson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Brennan Poole – Premium Motorsports’ No. 15 Chevrolet

(Photo by Jeff Robinson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Justin Haley – Kaulig Racing’s No. 16 Chevrolet (Daytona 500 only)

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Chris Buescher – Roush Fenway Racing’s No. 17 Ford

Roush Fenway Racing
Roush Fenway Racing
(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

 

Kyle Busch – Joe Gibbs Racing’s No. 18 Toyota

(Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)
Lionel Racing

Martin Truex Jr. – Joe Gibbs Racing’s No. 19 Toyota

 

Joe Gibbs Racing
Joe Gibbs Racing

Erik Jones – No. 20 Joe Gibbs Racing’s Toyota

Joe Gibbs Racing

Matt DiBenedetto – Wood Brothers Racing’s No. 21 Ford

(Photo by Jeff Robinson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Joey Logano – Team Penske’s No.  22 Ford

Team Penske

William Byron – Hendrick Motorsports’ No. 24 Chevrolet

Hendrick Motorsports
Hendrick Motorsports
Hendrick Motorsports

Reed Sorenson – Premium Motorsports’ No. 27 Chevrolet

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Corey LaJoie – Go Fas Racing’s No. 32 Ford

Go Fas Racing
Go Fas Racing
Go Fas Racing

Michael McDowell – Front Row Motorsports’ No. 34 Ford

Michael McDowell
Front Row Motorsports

Ryan Preece – JTG Daugherty Racing’s No. 37 Chevrolet

(Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

 

John Hunter Nemechek – Front Row Motorsport’s No. 38 Ford

John Hunter Nemechek
Front Row Motorsports
Front Row Motorsports
Front Row Motorsports

Cole Custer – Stewart-Haas Racing’s No. 41 Ford

Stewart-Haas Racing

Kyle Larson – Chip Ganassi Racing’s No. 42 Chevrolet

Chip Ganassi Racing
Chip Ganassi Racing
(Photo by Jeff Robinson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

 

Bubba Wallace – Richard Petty Motorsports’ No. 43 Chevrolet

Richard Petty Motorsports
Richard Petty Motorsports

Ricky Stenhouse Jr. – JTG Daugherty Racing’s No. 47 Chevrolet

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

 

Jimmie Johnson – Hendrick Motorsports’ No. 48 Chevrolet

Hendrick Motorsports

Chad Finchum – MBM Motorsports’ No. 49 Toyota

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Joey Gase – Rick Ware Racing’s No. 51 Chevrolet

(Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

JJ Yeley – Rick Ware Racing’s No. 54 Ford

(Photo by Jeff Robinson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Brendan Gaughan – Beard Motorsports’ No. 62 Chevrolet

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Timmy Hill – MBM Motorsports’ No. 66 Ford

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Ross Chastain – Chip Ganassi Racing/Spire Motorsports’ No. 77 Chevrolet

(Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

Alex Bowman – Hendrick Motorsports’ No. 88 Chevrolet

Hendrick Motorsports
Hendrick Motorsports

Christopher Bell – Leavine Family Racing’s No. 95 Toyota

Leavine Family Racing
Leavine Family Racing

Daniel Suarez – Gaunt Bros Racing’s No. 96 Toyota

(Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

2020 helmet designs for Cup Series drivers

Kyle Larson
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NASCAR’s best assembled in Charlotte last week for media day ahead of the 2020 season, as each driver paraded in front of multiple cameras to show off their new threads (firesuits), record promos for tracks and GIFs for social media accounts.

They also got to show off their new helmets for the year.

Here’s a look at the helmets Cup Series drivers will sport this season.

Cole Custer

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Clint Bowyer

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Kevin Harvick

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Aric Almirola

Graythen/Getty Images)

Austin Dillon

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Tyler Reddick

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Brad Keselowski

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

 

Ryan Newman

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Chris Buescher

(Graythen/Getty Images)

Matt DiBenedetto

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Bubba Wallace

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Joey Gase

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Ryan Blaney

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Kurt Busch

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Erik Jones

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Ryan Preece

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Jimmie Johnson

Graythen/Getty Images)

Martin Truex Jr.

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Joey Logano

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Daniel Suarez

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

 

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

William Byron

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Chase Elliott

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

John Hunter Nemechek

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Ty Dillon

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Kyle Busch

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Michael McDowell

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Quin Houff

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Corey LaJoie

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Kyle Larson

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

 

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Denny Hamlin

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Christopher Bell

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

 

While he’s not a Cup Series driver, we had to share Xfinity Series driver Chase Briscoe‘s Ford Mustang-themed helmet.

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)