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Chase Elliott, Bubba Wallace lead Cup drivers in gained Twitter followers in 2018

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We’re now in the final hours of 2018 and as we all reflect on its highs and lows, it’s time to follow-up on one lingering thread from the beginning of the year.

On Jan. 2 we published a post looking at how many Twitter followers each full-time Cup driver had that day.

Now we’ve gone through and tallied up their totals 12 months later.

These numbers come with a bit of an asterisk. In July, Twitter undertook a campaign to purge the social media platform of bot accounts and the accounts of NASCAR drivers and teams were not left untouched.

On Jan. 2, Jimmie Johnson led all full-time Cup drivers with 2,636,014 followers. According to Kickin’ the Tires, Johnson lost roughly 60,000 followers in the purge, putting him at around 2.6 million. At press time on Dec. 31, his follower count had risen to 2,645,151. He’s the only active Cup driver with more than a million followers.

Overall, Chase Elliott and Bubba Wallace had the largest net gains in followers. Elliott added 74,572 followers in the year where he was voted the Cup Series’ Most Popular Driver. Wallace added 57,163 followers in a year where he finished second in the Daytona 500 and was the subject of a Facebook Watch series that documented the build up to his start in the race.

Denny Hamlin saw the largest net loss of followers. On Jan. 2 he had 763,325 followers. Five months after the purge, Hamlin has 721,289 followers for a let loss of just over 42,000 followers.

Here’s each Cup driver’s follower count on Jan. 2 and their count 12 months later (post bot account purge).

 

Driver                     Jan. 2 total                Dec. 31 total

Jimmie Johnson – 2,636,014                    2,645,151 (Net gain of 9,137)

Kasey Kahne – 963,189                             985,387 (Net gain of 22,198)

Kevin Harvick – 954,433                           981,109 (Net gain of 26,676)

Kyle Busch – 899,151                                 897,231 (Net loss of 1,920)

Brad Keselowski – 766,394                       756,456 (Net loss of 9,938)

Denny Hamlin – 763,325                            721,289 (Net loss of 42,036)

Chase Elliott – 733,157                               807,729 (Net gain of 74,572)

Clint Bowyer – 626,345                              666,390 (Net gain of 40,045)

Joey Logano – 472,237                              481,538 (Net gain of 9,301 in title season)

Martin Truex Jr. – 423,074                         446,344 (Net gain of 23,270)

Ryan Newman – 367,002                            360,882 (Net loss of 6,120))

Kyle Larson – 349,659                                395,424 (Net gain of 45,765)

Kurt Busch – 342,699                                 376,789 (Net gain of 34,090)

Jamie McMurray – 317,209                         317,617 (Net gain of 408)

Trevor Bayne – 272,939                              260,528 (Net loss of 12,411)

Austin Dillon – 270,967                                278,484 (Net gain of 7,517)

Ricky Stenhouse Jr. – 227,632                    228,456 (Net gain of 824)

AJ Allmendinger – 217,197                           216,738 (Net loss of 459)

Ryan Blaney – 161,730                                 213,678 (Net gain of 51,948)

Ty Dillon – 156,602                                      159,270 (Net gain of 2,668)

Darrell Wallace Jr. – 126,473                      183,636 (Net gain of 57,163)

David Ragan – 121,643                                120,490 (Net loss of 1,153)

Aric Almirola – 112,423                                127,860 (Net gain of 15,437)

Michael McDowell – 88,435                       88,340 (Net loss of 95)

Alex Bowman – 58,194                                77,965 (Net gain of 19,771)

Erik Jones – 53,041                                     68,140 (Net gain of 15,099)

Matt DiBenedetto – 49,495                        59,864 (Net gain of 10,369)

Daniel Suarez – 41,081                                52,589 (Net gain of 11,508)

Chris Buescher – 38,981                             27,868 (Net loss of 11,113)

William Byron – 36,169                                55,416 (Net gain of 19,247)

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NASCAR reveals playoff team hashtags, emojis

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After every Cup Series playoff driver had a special hashtag and emoji last season, NASCAR is taking it one step further.

It revealed on Wednesday the new set of emojis and hashtags for the postseason that begins Sunday at Las Vegas Motor Speedway (3 p.m. ET on NBCSN).

This time around the emojis will be included on the driver’s cars themselves, located on the front sides of their cars. Non-playoff drivers will display the Twitter bird and #NASCARPlayoffs.

The hashtags and emojis will be available to Twitter users until each driver is eliminated from championship contention. Fans can also unlock the official NASCAR Playoffs emoji on Twitter by tweeting with #NASCARPlayoffs throughout the 10-week postseason.

Look below for each driver’s hashtag/emoji combination.

Brad Keselowski

Austin Dillon

Kevin Harvick

 

Chase Elliott

Writer’s note: Elliott’s emoji is a depiction of the siren at the Dawsonville Poole Hall that goes off anytime he or his father, Bill Elliott, win a race.

Aric Almirola

Denny Hamlin

Ryan Blaney

Clint Bowyer

Kyle Busch

Erik Jones

Joey Logano

Kurt Busch

Kyle Larson

Writer’s note: Larson, a native of California, has the bear logo from the California state flag on his emoji.

Jimmie Johnson

Martin Truex Jr.

Alex Bowman

Writer’s note: Bowman’s emoji features the yellow rookie stripes on the back of his car. Bowman is not a rookie, but he’s been in on an ongoing joke that he is.

Denny Hamlin offers advice on how to deal with critics on social media

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Denny Hamlin, who has been fined by NASCAR for comments on Twitter, and was vocal toward critics after this year’s Daytona 500, says he’s found peace on how to deal with those on social media who don’t agree with him.

“I’ve been very good this year about not replying to mean people, and you all should do the same,’’ Hamlin said Friday at Sonoma Raceway.

“I’m making a (request) right now to every driver, every team owner, every NASCAR executive and every media member, stop replying to people who make nonsense comments. They have 16 followers. Don’t give them your 100,000. Do not give them your 100,000 as their stage. No one will ever see their comment, just brush it by, talk about the positives and I’m not a positive person.”

Asked how does one ignore such divisive comments, Hamlin said: “You just scroll by it. Forget it. That person doesn’t exit. They’re an admirer that has lost their way.’’

Hamlin has been better at doing so since the Daytona 500. He faced negative reaction on social media to the contact he and Bubba Wallace had at the end of the Daytona 500.

They engaged in a brief shouting match in the garage area after Hamlin learned that Wallace had taken a dig at him on national TV about a recent comment about drivers using Adderall.

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Kyle Larson wants to compete in World of Outlaws full-time ‘before I’m 40’

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Late last year Kyle Larson said his main career goal was to compete full-time in the World of Outlaws and that “NASCAR’s just the step to get there.”

Now the 25-year-old Cup driver has told the Internet that he hopes to compete full-time in World of Outlaws “Before I’m 40.”

In a lengthy Q&A session, Larson answered a fan’s question about the topic.

It was on the official World of Outlaws podcast in December where Larson expressed his desire to eventually transition to World of Outlaws.

“NASCAR is where I wanted to make it, but I would have been perfectly fine if I didn’t make it either,” Larson said. “I’d probably be on the Outlaw (sprint car) tour probably right now, racing and loving life … I would say racing on the World of Outlaws tour full-time is my main goal.”

A lot can change between now and 2033 – which would put Larson at 18 full-time Cup seasons after 2032 – so better stock up on those Larson race win diecasts while you can over the next 15 or so years.

Here’s other tidbits from Larson’s Q&A session:

Larson declared his stance on last year’s peaceful protests by NFL players regarding police brutality and unequal treatment of African-Americans that took place during the National Anthem.

Last September, President Donald Trump praised NASCAR in general and its “supporters and fans,” saying “They won’t put up with disrespecting our Country or our Flag!”

That was after team owner Richard Childress and Richard Petty said they would fire any employees who kneeled during the anthem in protest.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. later tweeted in support of the protests and Jimmie Johnson also said he supported peaceful protests.

Larson’s response was noted by other NASCAR drivers.

If you’ve noticed Larson isn’t running against the wall as much this season, there’s a reason.

Larson believes the Cup Series needs more short tracks to garner more excitement and that the cars are not the problem.

Larson also expressed a desire for there to be mid-week races on the schedule.

Larson is not planning on competing in the Camping World Truck Series race at Eldora Speedway, which he won in 2016.

Larson thinks a Truck race at Knoxville Raceway, the dirt track that hosts the Knoxville Nationals, would be worthwhile.

Larson also announced where he’ll be competing in some sprint races later this year.

Long: NASCAR-related tweets did not reflect positively on sport after Texas race

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As if DeLana Harvick had enough to do. The wife to Kevin Harvick and mother of two children, including a daughter born in December, had to be the voice of reason Sunday night for a sport filled with snipes, swipes and other barbs toward one another after the Texas race.

The back-and-forth carried over to social media and included everyone from a senior NASCAR executive to a team co-owner, crew chiefs and more.

Just as a mother does when she tells a child to stop misbehaving, DeLana Harvick put her foot down on social media with a tweet at 10:38 p.m. ET. It was not addressed to anybody in particular but to anyone watching Twitter after the race — which proved to be as drama-filled as the 500-mile event — it was a good reminder for many on social media.

Until that point, Twitter had been quite interesting for a NASCAR fan if you knew where to look.

NASCAR President Brent Dewar engaged with fans as he often does, but his tone was a bit more aggressive than the other times he’s conversed with fans.

Admittedly, some fans were upset that NASCAR didn’t penalize Harvick’s team for an uncontrolled tire late in the race. NASCAR admitted after the race it made a mistake. Then Monday morning, Scott Miller, NASCAR senior vice president of competition, called the non-call a “close call.’’

Dewar engaged with a fan who was upset about the non-call Sunday night.

Obviously, race control is a secure area and where NASCAR’s officials call the race. To suggest a fan could visit race control seems over the top. While Dewar sought to maintain a sense of levity in the response with the emojis, some could view his comments more harshly than intended.

But it wasn’t just Dewar on social media that stirred debate and discussion on matters. Pit guns were another key point after Sunday’s race, triggered by Harvick’s comments after the race. He expressed his frustration after pit gun issues potentially cost him a chance to win Saturday’s Xfinity and Sunday’s Cup races at Texas.

Harvick said the pit guns “have been absolutely horrible all year, and our guys do a great job on pit road, and the pathetic part about it is the fact you get handed something that doesn’t work correctly, and those guys are just doing everything that they can to try to make it right.”

He isn’t the only one to be upset about the pit guns this year. Cole Pearn, crew chief for Martin Truex Jr., expressed his displeasure with the pit guns at Atlanta. Pearn let his voice be heard again Sunday after the race, commenting on an article that noted Harvick’s frustration with the pit guns.

Pearn referenced the Race Team Alliance, which features most of the Cup teams. Pearn’s team, Furniture Row Racing, is not a member. Pearn’s tweet earned a response from Rob Kauffman, chairman of the Race Team Alliance and a co-owner of Chip Ganassi Racing.

Car owner Joe Gibbs said after Kyle Busch‘s win that he’s not a fan of the NASCAR-mandated pit guns.

“I don’t like things not in our hands,” Gibbs said. “So, you know, be quite truthful, I’ve taken a stand on that. That’s something that I hope we continue to really evaluate, continue to evaluate that.”

There was more Sunday.

Harvick’s crew chief, Rodney Childers responded to a tweet from Ty Gibbs that has since been deleted. Gibbs, the 15-year-old grandson of Joe Gibbs and a part of the JGR driver development program, referenced Ford in his tweet after Kyle Busch’s JGR Toyota car won at Texas.

Regardless of whom DeLana Harvick targeted in her tweet Sunday night, NASCAR Twitterverse calmed down. How long remains to be seen.

The stretch of short tracks continues this weekend with Bristol and next weekend with Richmond.

One can only imagine what will be on social media after those races.

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