Tim Richmond

Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images

Tonight’s Cup race at Darlington: Start time, lineup and more

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NASCAR’s throwback weekend reaches a crescendo with tonight’s Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway.

Paint schemes that pay tribute to such drivers as Rusty Wallace, Mark Martin, Bill Elliott, Darrell Waltrip, Dale Jarrett, Tony Stewart and Tim Richmond and cars from “Days of Thunder” and “Stroker Ace” will circle the track.

Here’s all the info you need for tonight’s race.

(All times are Eastern)

START: The command to start engines will be given at 6:07 p.m. by 2020 NASCAR Hall of Fame inductees Joe Gibbs, Bobby Labonte, Tony Stewart and Waddell Wilson along with Jose Armario, Bojangles’ CEO. The green flag is scheduled to wave at 6:15 p.m.

PRERACE: Garage opens at 1 p.m. Driver/crew chief meeting is at 4 p.m. Driver introductions are at 5:20 p.m. The invocation will be given at 6 p.m. by Dr. Bill Curtis, pastor of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Darlington, South Carolina. Edwin McCain will perform the National Anthem at 6:01 p.m.

DISTANCE: The race is 367 laps (501.3 miles) around the 1.366-mile short track.

STAGES: Stage 1 ends on Lap 100. Stage 2 ends on Lap 200.

TV/RADIO: NBCSN will televise the race. Coverage begins at 5 p.m. with NASCAR America. Countdown to Green begins at 5:30 p.m. Motor Racing Network’s radio broadcast begins at 5 p.m and also can be heard on mrn.com. SiriusXM NASCAR Radio will carry MRN’s broadcast.

FORECAST: Wunderground.com forecasts a high of 81 degrees with a 41% chance of scattered thunderstorms at the start of the race.

LAST TIME: Brad Keselowski won last year’s Southern 500. Joey Logano finished second. Kyle Larson placed third. 

TO THE REAR: Kyle Busch (engine change), Aric Almirola (backup), Reed Sorenson (transmission change), Joe Nemechek (unapproved adjustments) and BJ McLeod (unapproved adjustments)

STARTING LINEUP: Southern 500 lineup

Bump and Run: Going back in time on a throwback weekend

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With this throwback weekend at Darlington Raceway, give us a driver, race or era in NASCAR you would have liked to have seen in person and why?

Dustin Long: Always heard so much about Curtis Turner and his talent. Would have liked to have seen him behind the wheel once.

Daniel McFadin: I wish I could go back in time and attend the inaugural Brickyard 400. Seeing the packed grandstands in highlights is one thing. I can’t imagine what the atmosphere must have been like in person for the first NASCAR race at such a historic facility. 

Tim Richmond. (Photo by ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images)

Jerry Bonkowski: Actually, there are several drivers I’d love to have seen: Fireball Roberts, Tim Richmond, Lee Petty and Buck Baker.

As for races: I’d have loved to have been at the first Daytona 500 in 1959.

And as for era: While I’ve seen several black-and-white films over the years, I’d have loved to watch a race in person on the beach in Daytona long before they built Daytona International Speedway.

 

William Byron and Daniel Suarez are in position to each make the Cup playoffs for the first time. Byron is 75 points ahead of what would be the first driver out at this time. Suarez holds what would be the final playoff spot by two points. Do both make the playoffs?

Dustin Long: Not convinced Daniel Suarez remains in a playoff spot the next two races and makes it.

Daniel McFadin: I think William Byron makes it safely into the playoffs, while Daniel Suarez gets nicked thanks to a first-time winner.

Jerry Bonkowski: Daniel Suarez has to have two of the best races of his life at Darlington and Indianapolis to ensure he makes the playoffs. Anything less in either one and he could come up short, which would be a sad commentary on the strong season he’s had to date. As for William Byron, the main thing he has to do is play it safe at two of the most difficult tracks there are and not take any unnecessary chances that could lead to disaster. I think crew chief Chad Knaus will keep Byron in-check more than he ever has in the next two races.

 

Aric Almriola, Ryan Blaney, Alex Bowman, Clint Bowyer, Kurt Busch, William Byron, Chase Elliott, Erik Jones, Kyle Larson, Joey Logano, Ryan Newman and Daniel Suarez are among the drivers who have not won a Cup race at Darlington. Who do you think will be the next from this group to win there?

Dustin Long: Joey Logano. Former champion’s day is coming at a track that often rewards champions.

Daniel McFadin: Kyle Larson had the car to win at Darlington the last two years, leading 408 laps combined but finishing 14th (2017) and third (2018). He ends a nearly two-year winless streak Sunday.

Jerry Bonkowski: This is a tough question. But I have to go with the veterans as having the best chance, in order: Logano, Busch, Newman, Bowyer and Larson. It just goes to show how difficult Darlington is when you have several of the most successful drivers in the sport – including two former series champions – that have yet to win at such a storied and legendary track.

Alex Bowman to drive Tim Richmond throwback paint scheme at Darlington

Photo: Hendrick Motorsports
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BROOKLYN, Mich. — Alex Bowman will drive a throwback car in the Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway that pays homage to Tim Richmond.

The announcement Friday came on what would have been Richmond’s 64th birthday. Richmond died of complications from AIDS on Aug. 13, 1989.

Richmond competed in NASCAR from 1980-87, winning 13 of 185 Cup races. He drove for car owner Rick Hendrick in 1986-87 and was paired with crew chief Harry Hyde in 1986. Richmond won nine of 37 races with Hendrick Motorsports.

“He’s definitely a character,” Bowman said Friday at Michigan International Speedway. “Just hearing stories. There are a lot of people at (Hendrick Motorsports) that worked with him or worked around him, so there’s a lot of stories that get told. It’s pretty interesting. If I was a race fan, that’s who I would have cheered for.”

Last year, JR Motorsports paid tribute with a throwback car to Richmond’s from 1983-85. Tyler Reddick drove that car for JR Motorsports.

Coffee with Kyle: Richard Petty and Dale Inman went separate ways

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With the end of the 2018 season, Jimmie Johnson and Chad Knaus have parted ways. Johnson has a new crew chief in Kevin Meendering; Knaus has a new driver in William Byron.

The latest edition of “Coffee with Kyle” takes a look at another legendary pairing that split up: Richard Petty and his cousin Dale Inman.

Petty and Inman both believe Knaus has a better chance at winning another championship than Johnson. They came to that conclusion based on experience.

Petty and Inman combined for 166 wins and seven championships before they split up.

“(Going our separate ways) was probably one of the best things that ever happened to both of us,” Petty said. “Because once we got away from each other we realized how we depended on each other.”

Separating might have been good for them personally, but Petty’s performance was never the same. He went on to win just two more races.

Petty’s 199th win came at Dover in May 1984.

“Dover was a big win,” Petty said. “It had been a while since we won. But then everything was ‘the next race, the next race, the next race’ before we went to Daytona. Everybody was expecting the 200 anytime. We was too. But it couldn’t have been any better than for us to win the 200th race July the 4th in front of the President of the United States (Ronald Reagan).

“If you wrote a script, nobody would have bought it.”

Part 1: Richard Petty: Racing ‘took us to the real world’
Part 2: The story behind debut of Plymouth’s NASCAR Superbird

Inman was hired by Rod Osterlund in 1980 and crewed the car for Dale Earnhardt and later Joe Ruttman without another win. 

“Then we got Tim Richmond and what a natural he was,” Inman said. “Didn’t know nothing about a race car. … Even Earnhardt respected him a lot, because he came in and raced Earnhardt.”

In 1982 Richmond won twice at Riverside. Those were the first wins for Inman after leaving Petty Enterprises.

Inman scored another championship with Terry Labonte in 1984. They won on consistency with only two wins but top fives in 17 of 30 races that year.

Regarding a short-lived pairing with Earnhardt, Inman said: “He couldn’t control himself. Darrell Waltrip intimidated him so bad it was unreal. The bad thing on my resume was I never won a race with Earnhardt.”

The episode can be found on the NBC Sports YouTube page.

Click here to watch the “Coffee with Kyle” episode with Tony Stewart.

Tyler Reddick honoring Tim Richmond at Darlington

JR Motorsports
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Tyler Reddick will pay tribute to the late Tim Richmond with his paint scheme for Saturday’s Xfinity race at Darlington Raceway (3:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN).

Reddick’s No. 9 Chevrolet will be sponsored by Old Milwaukee beer and will bear the scheme Richmond had in the Cup Series when the beer sponsored his No. 27 Pontiac LeMans from 1983-85.

Richmond, who died in 1989 at 34 from complications from AIDS, had 13 wins in 189 Cup starts from 1980-87.

His life and career were documented in the ESPN 30 for 30 documentary “Tim Richmond: To the Limit.”

During his Old Milwaukee days, Richmond drove for the Blue Max team owned by Raymond Beadle.

Raymond’s son Ryan is general counsel for JR Motorsports.

“Everything I had heard about Tim Richmond, which a lot of it goes off of the stories I’ve heard from people close to me in the garage, is that he was a guy that when he came up was one of the most talented drivers out here and that he was always really good at trying to have fun and be himself,” Reddick said in a press release. “He was about having fun and enjoying himself and winning races at the same time. I feel like he sometimes just flew under the radar a little bit and I feel like there is a connection there to how I try to go about my life, which makes it that much more special to be running this throwback scheme to him in Darlington.”