Spencer Gallagher

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Today’s Xfinity race at Talladega: Start time, lineup and more

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The Xfinity Series competes this afternoon at Talladega Superspeedway.

Here’s all the info you need for today’s Dash 4 Cash race:

(All times are Eastern)

START: Dee Choubey, MoneyLion CEO, will give the command to start engines at 1:07 p.m. The green flag is scheduled for 1:19 p.m.

PRERACE: Driver/crew chief meeting is at Noon. Driver introductions begin at 12:30 p.m. The invocation will be given at 1 p.m. by Billy Irvan, Alabama Raceway Ministries. Amia Nico will perform the National Anthem at 1:01 p.m.

DISTANCE: The race is 113 laps (300.58 miles) around the 2.66-mile track.

STAGES: Stage 1 ends on Lap 25. Stage 2 ends on Lap 50.

TV/RADIO: Fox Sports 1 will televise the race. Coverage begins at 1 p.m. Motor Racing Network’s radio broadcast begins at 12:30 p.m. and also can be heard at mrn.com. SiriusXM NASCAR Radio will carry MRN’s broadcast.

FORECAST: wunderground.com calls for a high of 73 degrees and a 0 percent chance of rain for the start of the race.

LAST TIME: Spencer Gallagher won this race last year, beating Brandon Jones and Justin Allgaier.

STARTING LINEUP: Click here for the lineup

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State Water Heaters to sponsor Jeb Burton’s 5 races with JR Motorsports

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JR Motorsports on Wednesday announced that State Water Heaters will sponsor Jeb Burton’s five-race stint in the No. 8 Chevrolet Camaro in the 2019 NASCAR Xfinity Series.

State Water Heaters has been involved with the Burton family since 2007, starting first with Jeb’s father, Ward Burton, in NASCAR Cup and the NASCAR Truck Series, as well as with Jeb Burton in the Truck Series and in Late Models.

“I’m very excited to continue my partnership with State Water Heaters and make the introduction between them and JR Motorsports,” Jeb Burton said in a media release. “State has been an amazing partner over the years and has become family – helping me from the very start of my career going back to Late Models.”

Burton will debut the black, orange and blue No. 8 State Water Heaters Chevrolet Camaro at Texas Motor Speedway (March 30), as well as Charlotte Motor Speedway (May 25), Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Sept. 7), a return stint to Texas (Nov. 2) and the season finale at Miami (Nov. 16). Alsco and Ultimate Headers will serve as associate partners for those same five races.

Burton will share driving duties of the No. 8 through the course of the season with Spencer Gallagher, Ryan Preece, Ryan Truex and Zane Smith.

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JR Motorsports reveals new car number, driver assignments

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JR Motorsports on Friday used the announcement of a car number change to reveal its driver lineup for a new No. 8 car in the Xfinity Series.

What was the No. 9 team in 2018 will become the No. 8 team in 2019 with an assortment of drivers including Zane Smith, Jeb Burton, Ryan Truex, Spencer Gallagher and Ryan Preece.

Noah Gragson, the rookie who was originally announced to take over the No. 1 Chevrolet, will now drive the No. 9.

Meanwhile, Michael Annett, who has driven the No. 5 since he joined JRM in 2017, will now drive the No. 1.

The No. 1 has history with the Annett family, as sprint-car racing legend Sammy Swindell drove it in a car owned by Michael’s father, Harrold Annett.

Only the car numbers are changing on Gragson’s and Annett’s cars. The previously announced crew chief and roster lineups will remain the same.

Justin Allgaier will continue to drive the No. 7.

MORE: JR Motorsports, GMS Racing join forces on driver development program

The No. 8 has a long history in the Earnhardt family, with team co-owner Dale Earnhardt Jr. driving it in the Cup Series from 1999 – 2007. His grandfather, Ralph Earnhardt, also drove it, as well as Junior’s father, Dale Earnhardt.

“Everybody remembers the number on the side of the car,” Earnhardt Jr. said in a press release. “The No. 8 is very special to me and to JR Nation. There’s a lot of history with the No. 8 in my family and in NASCAR. It’s time to write some new stories and continue to add to the number’s rich heritage.”

Taylor Moyer has been named the crew chief of the No. 8. Moyer, 31, joins JRM after serving as an engineer for Hendrick Motorsports on the cars driven by Kasey Kahne and William Byron.

Gallagher will race for JRM after stepping away from full-time race at the end of 2018 to move into a leadership role at GMS Racing. 

Preece drove for Joe Gibbs Racing part-time the last two seasons and will drive for JTG Daugherty Racing full-time in the Cup Series this season.

Smith, a member of NASCAR Next, is making his debut in the Xfinity Series this year.

Truex, the brother of Cup driver Martin Truex Jr., joins JRM after competing full-time for Kaulig Racing in the Xfinity Series in 2018. Truex Jr. won two Xfinity championships for Earnhardt while driving the No. 8 in 2004-05.

Burton, the son of former Cup driver Ward Burton, made three Xfinity starts for Richard Childress Racing last year.

Here’s when each driver will race the No. 8 this season. This makes up only 24 of the season’s 33 races.

Gallagher – Daytona International Speedway (Feb. 16), Talladega Superspeedway (April 27) and the return event at Daytona (July 5).

Preece – Atlanta Motor Speedway (Feb. 23), Auto Club Speedway (March 16), Pocono Raceway (June 1) and Watkins Glen International (Aug. 3)

Smith – Las Vegas Motor Speedway (March 2), Bristol Motor Speedway (April 6), both Richmond Raceway events (April 12 and Sept. 20), Dover International Speedway (May 4 and Oct. 5) and Iowa Speedway (June 16 and July 27)

Truex – ISM Raceway (March 9), Las Vegas Motor Speedway (Sept. 14), Charlotte Motor Speedway (Sept. 28) and Kansas Speedway (Oct. 19)

Burton – Texas Motor Speedway (March 30 and Nov. 2), Charlotte Motor Speedway (May 25), Chicagoland Speedway (June 29) and Homestead-Miami Speedway (Nov. 16)

Spencer Gallagher will not race for GMS Racing in 2019

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KANSAS CITY, Kansas – Spencer Gallagher announced Friday that he will not return to the No. 23 Xfinity car for GMS Racing after this season.

Gallagher said he would take a more managerial role in his family’s GMS Racing team. He said the team has not selected a replacement. He also said that team will continue to field entries in the Truck Series.

Gallagher has one career Xfinity win in 55 career starts. He won at Talladega in April. Shortly after he was suspended indefinitely for violating NASCAR’s substance abuse policy. He returned at Kentucky in July. He said he has no plans to race again, although he didn’t rule out a possible Truck race at some point.

“Trust me when I say this is the hardest decision I have ever had to make and I do not make it lightly,” Gallagher said Friday at Kansas Speedway. “At the end of the day, this came down to what do I want for my future, what do I want for GMS’ future and how can I grow this team and this sport. Candidly, the problem with being a driver is if you’re going to be a driver, that’s generally all you can be. … If you’re going to be a driver, at least to my mind, you need to be a race car driver from the time you wake up at 6 a.m. Monday morning to the time you go to bed at 10 p.m. Sunday night.

“There’s absolutely no off-time. You have to be totally focused and totally committed every second of the day to pushing yourself and your team to finding that last little tenth. That can be a really time-consuming process as fun as it is. It doesn’t leave a lot of room for any other ventures to go on and I make no bones about it I’m a businessman’s son. At the end of the day I see opportunity out here and I feel a calling within me to go chase it to benefit myself and benefit our sport.

“I think, candidly, this sport could use young fresh minds in leadership roles that are not afraid to go out and try to change things up and try to find something that works that helps all of us out. That’s what I see. I came here 10 years ago and I fell in love with this sport, with this business. I want to help it thrive. I believe, more so than in the seat, that’s where my real skill set lays.

“I’ve got a lot of connections still back in Silicon Valley. Racing can be a unique crucible again for proving out a lot of automotive technologies that are getting ready to hit us.”

Long: Is Talladega supposed to look like this?

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So what is NASCAR? Is it a sport? Or is it a show?

Admittedly, those in the NASCAR offices likely will view its racing as both. But that creates a conflict over how to look at Sunday’s race at Talladega Superspeedway.

If one views it as a sporting event, Stewart-Haas Racing’s domination — qualifying all of its cars in the top four, running there much of the race and Aric Almirola winning with Clint Bowyer second — should be celebrated because SHR did what every team hopes to do every weekend.

But that performance doesn’t play well to the overall view of the race (or show). With SHR controlling the front and drivers battling ill-handling cars, the two- and three-wide racing so common at Talladega often was replaced by single-file racing.

The 15 lead changes were the fewest at Talladega since 1973.

Green flag passes — a stat NASCAR tracks based on position changes over each scoring loop on every lap — were down 54.4 percent from last fall’s playoff race at Talladega.

Think about that … lead changes at its lowest level since before any driver in Sunday’s race was born and green-flag passes down more than 50 percent from the previous year.

Is that something fans want to see more of?

Doesn’t seem to be the case based on Jeff Gluck’s weekly Twitter poll. He stated that only 42 percent of those who voted this week thought Talladega was a good race.

Fewer than 50 percent of the voters said either Talladega race this year was a good one in Gluck’s poll. The April race had 24 lead changes — the fewest for that event since 19 lead changes in the 1998 race — and saw a 57.8 percent decline in green-flag passes.

There’s an expectation when NASCAR races at Daytona and Talladega of pack racing, passing and wild action.

Such was in limited supply at both Talladega races this year. But it wasn’t just there. The four plate races (Daytona and Talladega) saw 89 lead changes this season — down 29.4 percent from last year’s plate races.

While three of the four plate races this year ended with a last-lap pass (Austin Dillon in the Daytona 500, Erik Jones at Daytona in July and Aric Almirola at Talladega last weekend), not everyone may be willing to wait through the racing to those final laps.

With the 2019 rules package, NASCAR anticipates pack racing to remain key at Daytona and Talladega but Sunday’s race might force series officials to make some additional changes to ensure the pack is back next year.


Questions have been raised about how NASCAR officiated the end of the Truck and Cup races this weekend at Talladega.

Kurt Busch was critical of NASCAR’s decision. Had NASCAR called a caution for the crash in Turn 1 on the last lap, Busch likely would have won. Instead, he ran out of fuel and Aric Almirola won.

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR’s chief racing development officer, explained Monday on SirusXM NASCAR Radio how series officials made the call on if to throw the caution in either race.

“Our first job is to always make sure everybody is safe, and we felt we did that in this case,” O’Donnell said about letting the Cup race finish under green.

While each last-lap scenario presents different challenges, NASCAR must remain steadfast in following what O’Donnell said in terms of driver safety. That must be No. 1 regardless of it is the last lap at Talladega, the last lap of the Daytona 500 or the last lap of the championship race in Miami.

NASCAR must be consistent with that. And that may mean calling for a caution instead of a dramatic race to the finish line.


It won’t be next year but maybe someday GMS Racing likely will field a Cup team.

GMS Racing, owned by Maury Gallagher, was in talks with Furniture Row Racing earlier this year to purchase the team’s charter, align with Joe Gibbs Racing and move to Cup next season. It’s one of the reasons why the team, through Mike Beam, didn’t try to top Front Row Motorsports’ bid for BK Racing’s charter and equipment in a court-appointed auction in August.

After examining all the costs, Gallagher decided not to pursue the Furniture Row Racing charter and equipment.

“We’re still talking and thinking about it, but first things first, we’re trying to get through this year and do some good things, particularly winning the (Truck) championship,” Gallagher said after Timothy Peters won the Truck race at Talladega.

Spencer Gallagher called the deal not working out a “tempered disappointment” but added “we got into that deal and we realized that we were going to have to undertake some additional complications with it. More than anything, if and when we make the decision to go Cup racing, I’d like to think that if we have one true luxury it is that we get to choose when and where we get to do it, which means that we’re committed to only doing it if it can be done right.

“As Maury likes to say, there’s always another deal that comes along. Patience is our watchword for getting ourselves into Cup.”

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