Scott Miller

NASCAR penalized Bubba Wallace for admission of spin

Leave a comment

AVONDALE, Ariz. — NASCAR penalized Bubba Wallace for intentionally spinning six days after he did so because of an admission to NBC Sports rather than data that Kyle Larson said clearly showed that Wallace spun on purpose after having a flat tire.

Scott Miller, NASCAR senior vice president for competition, said Saturday that Wallace was fined $50,000 and docked 50 points after he admitted in an interview with NBC Sports that he intentionally spun last weekend at Texas Motor Speedway.

“There can be a lot of accusations, but to be completely positive that’s what happened only happened when he raised his hand and said ‘I did it,’ “ Miller said. “That was full admission of something that has been abuzz in the garage and in the media.”

Miller questioned those who say that data, including throttle and steering traces that are available to all teams, clearly showed Wallace spun intentionally after he had a flat tire.

“I would dispute that the data clearly shows it,” Miller said. “We don’t have a lot of data comparison of a guy trying to drive a car with a flat tire. So we’ve looked at all that. We don’t really feel like it’s as straightforward as some of the others do as far as the data showing definitively that he did it on purpose.

“We’ve all watched the cars drive down the straightaway with a flat tire weaving all over the place. So for us, to make a definitive call that a guy spun out on purpose when he can barely keep his car going straight is a big call. And it’s a judgment call. And it’s a call that we would like to not have to be able to make. So hopefully they can know the possibility of this happening is out there if it’s very blatant and that they don’t do it.”

Asked about his spin, Wallace told NBC Sports on Friday night: “I learned from Brad (Keselowski) and Joey (Logano).”

Asked if he was worried about any repercussions, Wallace told NBC Sports: “Until they do anything, no. I’m not the only one to do it. I’m racing for myself. Not for Larson. Not for Chevrolet at that moment. For myself and going multiple laps down.”

NASCAR fines Bubba Wallace $50,000 for intentionally spinning at Texas

8 Comments

AVONDALE, Ariz. – NASCAR fined Bubba Wallace $50,000 and docked him 50 points Saturday, a day after he told NBC Sports of his intentional spin last weekend at Texas Motor Speedway: “I’m not the only one to do it.”

NASCAR cited Wallace for violating Section 12.1.a General Procedures, Section 12.8 NASCAR Member Conduct, Section 12.8.1 Member Conduct Guidelines and Section 10.8 In-Race Violations.

MORE: NASCAR penalized Bubba Wallace for admission of spin

MORE: NBC analyst Dale Jarrett says drivers should not admit to spinning on purpose

The NASCAR Rule Book states in Section 10.8 that officials can impose a penalty for “intentionally causing or attempt to cause a caution period.”

Section 12.1.a of the Rule Book states: “NASCAR membership is a privilege. With that privilege comes certain benefits, responsibilities and obligations. Correct and proper conduct, both on and off the race track, is part of a Member’s responsibilities. A Member’s actions can reflect upon the sport as a whole and on other NASCAR Members. Ideally, NASCAR Members are role models for the many fans who follow this sport, regardless of the type of license a Member may hold, or the specific Series in which a Member may participate. Therefore, NASCAR views a Member’s conduct, both on and off the race track, which might constitute a behavioral Rules violation under this Rule Book with great importance.”

Richard Petty Motorsports issued a statement Saturday morning.

“Our team met with NASCAR officials this morning to discuss Darrell “Bubba” Wallace Jr.’s post-practice comments on Friday, November 8, concerning an on-track incident which occurred at the Texas Motor Speedway,” Philippe Lopez, Richard Petty Motorsports director of competition, said. “We fully understand NASCAR’s position and expectations of its competitors. NASCAR has a difficult job officiating race events and we do not need to make the task more challenging. Wallace will not appeal the penalty, and will direct his immediate focus to this weekend’s event at the ISM Raceway.”

Kyle Larson was upset after the Texas race because Wallace’s spin came in the middle of green-flag pit stops and put Larson, who had already pitted, down a lap. Larson had been running in the top five before and finished 12th.

Larson said Friday at ISM Raceway that data available to all teams showed Wallace intentionally spun after having a flat tire.

Informed of Larson’s comments, Wallace told NBC Sports:

“I learned from Brad (Keselowski) and Joey (Logano).”

Asked if he was worried about any repercussions, Wallace told NBC Sports: “Until they do anything, no. I’m not the only one to do it. I’m racing for myself. Not for Larson. Not for Chevrolet at that moment. For myself and going multiple laps down.”

NASCAR’s Scott Miller is scheduled to meet with the media later today to discuss the penalty.

NASCAR executive explains yellow line rulings at Talladega

1 Comment

Scott Miller, NASCAR’s senior vice president of competition, said the instances of vehicles going below the yellow line on the last lap of the Truck and Cup races at Talladega Superspeedway “were very, very different from one another,” with one being “a lot more blatant” than the other.

The first occurred Saturday in the Gander Outdoors Truck Series race, and saw Johnny Sauter‘s apparent win given to Spencer Boyd after Sauter forced Riley Herbst and his own truck below the yellow line as he defended the lead coming to the checkered flag. NASCAR dropped Sauter to the last car on the lead lap for the violation. He finished 14th.

On Monday, Ryan Blaney was briefly forced below the yellow line by Ryan Newman as they battled for the lead, but Newman did not go below the yellow line. Blaney nipped Newman at the finish line to win. NASCAR issued no penalty.

If NASCAR determines a driver forced another below the double yellow line in an effort to keep from being passed, they may be black flagged.

Miller made his comments on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio’s “The Morning Drive.”

Johnny Sauter went below the yellow line and forced Riley Herbst below it on the last lap of Saturday’s Truck Series race at Talladega. (Photo by David John Griffin/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

“First of all, one guy won the race or appeared to have won the race by making that move and the other didn’t,” Miller said. “When you’re talking about Johnny’s situation, he drove all four of his wheels under the yellow line to force (Herbst) down there. It was obviously a lot more blatant in our opinion than what transpired on (Monday). Blaney was down there, Ryan (Newman) wasn’t down there, but certainly in our opinion drove him down there.

“We reserve the right to call a car that forces another down below the yellow line. We can kind of use our judgement to assess the situation.

“No two ones of those situations are the same. There’s some subjectivity in it, which isn’t the greatest thing for us. But I think we’re very happy with the calls that we made and feel like both of them were right.”

Miller was asked by SiriusXM NASCAR Radio whether the yellow line rule is one that will be addressed going forward.

“The language of the rule is fine,” Miller said. “There’s always going to be judgment unless we put a wall down there or grass there or something like that. Those things would have their own set of large problems associated with them. We’ve looked at the language many times and have landed on where we are to let us make the calls we feel like are necessary for certain situations.

“If we didn’t have the yellow line rule, there’s no telling what might ensue with all the skid paths and everything leading into the back straight being so wide. We would find guys getting to the other end having no place to go but the apron. We have to enforce the yellow line rule and we are where we are. We look at everything every time when we have to make a call, all of our rules, not only race procedures, but technical rules as well.

“We’re constantly trying to get better. … I mean the yellow line rule is not something that we enjoy by any stretch of the imagination. But we have to have it. If we didn’t, there’d be even more mayhem more than likely.”

Miller also addressed why no caution was thrown on the last lap when Parker Kligerman and Chris Buescher wrecked on the frontstretch as the field approached the start-finish line. Both drivers were turned nose-first into the outside wall in the tri-oval.

“When it feels like that it’s not hampering us from dispatching the safety equipment we’ll let things play out,” Miller said. “That’s kind of our criteria for judging that. Everybody wants to see a checkered flag finish and not a field freeze. We’ll do everything that we can safely to make that happen.”

Miller was also asked by SiriusXM NASCAR Radio about NASCAR’s view on manufacturer coordination during superspeedway races. It was put under the spotlight Sunday during the initial rain delay when all Chevrolet drivers, crew chiefs and competition directors met privately for about 25 minutes.

“That’s always going to be subjective, right?” Miller said. “You’re going to have a race and there’s going to be teammates working together and there’s going to be cars from different camps working together on the situation out there in the race. … I don’t know why it got publicized this weekend as much as it did. I think all of the manufacturers and all of the teams internally meet and try to come up with a little bit of strategy to stick with one another in the draft.

“It’s not something that we can really officiate effectively. We can ask them not to talk about it I would assume, but it’s not something we can really officiate. If something becomes extremely blatant and you have people stopping or doing crazy things, then obviously we have to look at that. But as far as going out there and working together in the draft, that’s something that’s going to change every single lap depending on who you’re around. So there’s really no way to officiate that.”

 

Spencer Boyd wins Talladega Truck Series race after Johnny Sauter penalized

Getty Images
1 Comment

NASCAR declared Spencer Boyd the winner of Saturday’s Truck Series race at Talladega Superspeedway after penalizing Johnny Sauter for going below the yellow line and forcing Riley Herbst to do so while racing for the lead on the final lap.

The win is the first of Boyd’s career and comes in his 23rd career start. The driver for Young’s Motorsports is 24 and hails from Creve Coeur, Missouri.

“I got out (of the truck) and they’re like, ‘Hey, it’s under review,'” Boyd told FS1. “You never know what’s going to happen here. The guys gave me a great truck. I’m sitting there, ‘Man, second is amazing for us. I’m happy.’ We finished fourth at Daytona in this truck. One of my crew guys was like ‘You just won!’ I can’t believe this. Two weeks ago I wasn’t running this race. We put this together late with Alabama Roofing Professionals … It’s been a tough season. It’s been a lot of fun. …

“I had no idea what to expect,” Boyd continued. “You dream of winning a NASCAR race. Four years ago I was selling cars with my dad at Hendrick Automotive Group. A lot of people have believed in me to get me to this point. … It’s Talladega. Man, I don’t drink beer, but it might happen tonight!”

The top five in the overtime finish was completed by Todd Gilliland, Herbst, Brett Moffitt and Stewart Friesen.

Sauter was dropped to 14th, the last car on the lead lap.

“It ain’t the first win NASCAR’s taken from me,” Sauter told FS1. “I went down to put a little block on (Herbst), but when I did I got hooked sideways. But that’s just plate racing. I didn’t block his advance or anything like that. If I remember I think Tony Stewart and Regan Smith had the same deal (in 2008). Just hate it for my guys. They deserve better than that. What are you gonna say?”

Scott Miller, NASCAR’s vice president of competition, explained the decision on the finish.

“It’s made very clear in the rule book, in the driver’s meeting video and all of the dialogue we have with the drivers what you can and can’t do when it comes to the yellow line,” Miller said. “It was clearly a violation of what we ask of the drivers when it relates to the yellow line. So there was no other call for us to make, except for what we did.”

The overtime finish was setup by a Gus Dean crash on the backstretch with two laps go in the scheduled distance.

The race was red flagged for a 10-truck wreck with seven laps to go. The wreck involved race leader Ross Chastain, Harrison Burton, Timothy Peters and Grant Enfinger.

The wreck started when Chastain, who is in the playoffs, attempted to block a pass from Sheldon Creed and made contact with him, turning Chastain.

“I turned left on him,” Chastain told FS1. “Sorry to everybody that got taken out. That was on me.
“That was poor execution on my part.”

STAGE 1 WINNER: Sheldon Creed

STAGE 2 WINNER: Stewart Friesen

MORE: Race results, point standings

WHO HAD A GOOD RACE: Brett Moffitt (fourth) and Stewart Friesen (fifth) were the top finishing playoff drivers after they bounced back from a penalty for locking bumpers mid-race … Rookie Tyler Ankrum placed seventh in his first career start on a superspeedway.

WHO HAD A BAD RACE: Tyler Dippel was eliminated in a crash in Stage 2. He finished 31st … John Hunter Nemechek was eliminated and finished 30th due to damage suffered when trucks in front of him stacked up and he rammed into the back of Sheldon Creed … Anthony Alfredo finished 15th after he spun in Turn 4 from a punctured tire with 13 laps to go in the scheduled distance. He was making his first superspeedway start.

WHAT’S NEXT: Texas Roadhouse 200 at Martinsville Speedway at 1:30 p.m. ET on Oct. 26 on FS1

 

Long: NASCAR’s future steals spotlight from the past at Darlington

Leave a comment

DARLINGTON, S.C. — On a weekend when the past was prevalent, did NASCAR fans glimpse the sport’s future?

Erik Jones and Kyle Larson dueled for the lead in the final stage of the Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway, showing that a track that rewards experience can be tamed by younger drivers.

What made the moment special was how rare it was. And not just because it was after 1 a.m. ET when their battle was taking in the rain-delayed event.

Although the race was Larson’s 209th Cup start and Jones’ 100th, they hadn’t had any memorable encounters for the lead in NASCAR’s premier series.

But with Larson 27 years old and Jones 23, this could be just the beginning.

Jones went on to win the Southern 500 and Larson finished second, marking the first time the two placed first and second in a Cup race.

“It’s cool when you get to get out and race hard,” Jones said of racing Larson. “That’s what we love to do is get to get out there and battle with the best of the best, and there’s no better feeling than when you’re battling with a guy for the lead who is considered one of the better guys in the series, and especially at a place like Darlington (where) I feel like is really one of Kyle’s better tracks.”

The key moment came when Larson led the field to a restart on Lap 283 of the 367-lap race. Jones powered underneath Larson in Turn 2 to take the lead.

Erik Jones’ two career Cup wins have come at Daytona and Darlington. (Photo by Brian Lawdermilk/Getty Images)

Even though patience is preached at Darlington, Jones knew he needed to be aggressive.

“You’ve got to pick and choose your battles, and the one with Larson there was one I felt like was necessary to pick,” Jones said. “I felt like if I got behind him, I don’t think we win the race.

“This package is really tough to pass with here. I felt like tonight was a really big struggle as far as the package itself and making our way forward.  We made some passes on the very long runs in the race that we had and some on pit road and were able to position ourselves up front, but I knew if we got behind him, he was just fast enough he would have been able to defend. He’s a good enough driver he’s going to defend the same way I did him and Kyle (Busch).”

Larson countered in Turn 3 and moved ahead. Jones reclaimed the lead on the next lap. He went under Larson’s car in Turn 1 and barely cleared Larson when he moved up in front of the No. 42 Chevrolet.

“He cut me a little bit of a break letting me clear him up in 1 and 2, and I knew at that point we had to get the lead,” Jones said. “I knew if we could get it, we could set our pace. But I enjoyed racing with him. We raced hard.”

Larson, who would not get back by Jones, lamented his restart.

“We just didn’t have the greatest restarts there to allow Erik to get by me,” he said.

Jones’ victory marked the seventh time in 25 Cup races (28%) this season that a Cup driver under the age of 30 had won. Go back to early in last year’s playoffs and drivers under 30 have won 12 of the last 33 Cup races (36%).

That number could rise with the number of 20-somethings making an impact in the sport. Twenty of the 39 Southern 500 drivers this past weekend were under the age of 30, including eight of the top 14 finishers.

Darlington marked the fourth time this year that drivers under the age of 30 finished first and second in a Cup race. It also happened at Talladega (Chase Elliott won, Alex Bowman second), Chicagoland (Bowman won, Larson second), Daytona in July (Justin Haley won, William Byron second) and the Southern 500.

Last year, only once did drivers under the age of 30 finish first and second in a race. That came in the Daytona 500 when Austin Dillon won and Bubba Wallace finished second.

Already, Jones’ two Cup wins have come at Daytona (July 2018) and Darlington. Quite a way to start a career.

“It’s pretty crazy, right?” Jones said.

“The Southern 500 is a race that is the top three in my list for sure, and to get a win here this early in my career, it really means a lot to me.”

—————————————————————————————————————————————————

The Southern 500 was to have started at 6:15 p.m. ET Sunday but rain delayed the event nearly four hours.

The green flag didn’t wave until 10:07 p.m. for a race that often takes around four hours to run. This past weekend’s race ended at 1:53 a.m. ET.

So why did NASCAR start the race so late?

Scott Miller, NASCAR’s senior vice president of competition, explained Tuesday morning on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio’s “The Morning Drive” that Hurricane Dorian played a key role in the decision. South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster issued an evacuation order for residents living along the South Carolina coast that began at noon ET Monday.

“It was just a situation where we really felt like that … the sooner we could get the race in the books, the better for the officials of the state to be able to kind of move on and do what they needed to do to protect the people of South Carolina and then certainly worried about the fans and everybody (at the track) being able to get out of there,” Miller told SiriusXM NASCAR Radio.

“A bit of an unpredictable situation with the weather, so the best thing for us was to do what we did and try to get everybody safe and sound.”

—————————————————————————————————————————————————

Daniel Suarez and Ryan Newman head into this weekend’s regular-season finale at Indianapolis Motor Speedway tied in points for the final playoff spot and not seeing eye-to-eye on an incident in the Southern 500.

Suarez holds the final playoff spot over Newman on a tiebreaker, which is based on best finish this season. Suarez’s best finish this year is third at Texas. Newman’s best finish this season is fifth at Daytona in July.

MORE: Click here for points report

But the issue between them at Darlington took place early in the race. The caution came out on Lap 142 for Newman’s spin. It came after a duel with Suarez for 19th place.

“My car is clean,” Suarez told NBC Sports. “We all race very hard. Newman, he’s very well known for racing extremely hard. He’s one of the hardest guys to pass out there and I have a lot of respect for him. It was, I think, the second time or third time I was trying to pass him getting into (Turn) 1. He was just blocking me. At that time, I got him aero loose. I didn’t touch him. My car is 100% clean. That’s hard racing. He raced me hard and I raced him hard back.”

Newman told NBC Sports after the race: “He had me jacked up going into the corner and they said he hit me, pretty much uncalled for. He was struggling to catch me for a while and finally got to me and then just turned me around. Whether he hit me or not, he turned me around. So I guess what comes around, goes around.”

—————————————————————————————————————————————————

Erik Jones’ victory gives Joe Gibbs Racing wins in each of the sport’s crown jewel races run this year, heading into the final crown jewel race of the year.

Denny Hamlin won the Daytona 500. Martin Truex Jr. won the Coca-Cola 600. Jones added his name to the list with his Southern 500 win. This weekend the series races at Indianapolis Motor Speedway for what is considered one of the sport’s crown jewels.

No organization has swept all four races in the same season since Cup began racing at Indy in 1994.

 and on Facebook