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Richard Petty Motorsports continues to seek sponsorship for Bubba Wallace

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SPARTA, Kentucky – Richard Petty Motorsports states it is seeking sponsorship for some races the rest of the season for Bubba Wallace.

He is being sponsored in tonight’s Cup race at Kentucky Speedway (7:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN) by Petty’s Garage and Medallion Bank. Those companies are tied to team owners Richard Petty and Andrew Murstein.

“Our ownership of Andrew Murstein and Richard Petty are fully behind our plan with Bubba Wallace this year and into the future,” said Brian Moffitt, chief executive officer at Richard Petty Motorsports, in a statement. “They are going to step up and support RPM with their two great companies at various races this summer, but at the same time, they want everyone to know that there are sponsorship opportunities with the Petty brand and Wallace this season. we have a unique opportunity for companies to be a part of this season, and it’s important that people know.”

This is the second race that Petty’s Garage and Medallion Bank have been Wallace’s primary sponsor. Both companies were on his car at Talladega in the April. The team has had 14 different primary sponsors in the first 19 races. Click n’ Close and World Wide Technology each have been the primary sponsor the most on the car at three races each.

Wallace starts 25th in tonight’s race. He finished 14th last weekend at Daytona, his best finish since placing eight at Texas in April.

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Bump & Run: Our dream scenario for four-man race to Daytona checkers

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If you could bend time … regardless of eras, what four drivers would you like to see race for the win at Daytona?

Nate Ryan: Dale Earnhardt, Dale Earnhardt Jr. David Pearson and Richard Petty. When I think of winners in magical moments at Daytona, those are the four names that initially come to mind. The next question would be: Does the race happen with or without restrictor plates?

Dustin Long: Richard Petty, David Pearson, Dale Earnhardt Sr. and Mario Andretti. All Daytona 500 winners and among the greats in racing.

Daniel McFadin: Dale Earnhardt Jr. from 2004, Dale Earnhardt Sr. from 1991, Bill Elliott from 1988 and Brad Keselowski from today. Give them some IROC cars from 1999 and let them loose for 25 laps.

Dan Beaver: Richard Petty, David Pearson, Jeff Gordon and Dale Earnhardt Sr. I’m not sure who would win, but it would certainly be spectacular.

What driver currently outside a playoff spot is one you think has the best chance to win Saturday’s race at Daytona (7:30 p.m. ET on NBC)?

Nate Ryan: Jamie McMurray. The two-time winner at Daytona always is a solid driver in plate races if he can avoid the wrecks and getting antsy in the draft.

Dustin Long: Ryan Newman. He’s won at Daytona before and his teammate, Austin Dillon, won the Daytona 500 in February. Richard Childress Racing could make it two in a row there.

Daniel McFadin: I think Paul Menard could be a sleeper. He’s finished in the top six in his last three Daytona starts. He and AJ Allmendinger are the only drivers who have finished in the top 10 in the last three Daytona races.

Dan Beaver: The defending winner of this race, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., has a knack for plate racing and could get into the playoffs this week.

What’s the wildest finish you’ve witnessed?

Nate Ryan: The Oct. 7, 2012 race at Talladega Superspeedway. Tony Stewart attempted to throw a block off Turn 4 on the last lap, and 25 cars wrecked a few hundred yards from the finish line in a massive storm of dirt, sheet metal and smoke

Dustin Long: The finish to the 2007 Daytona 500. It has Kevin Harvick and Mark Martin side-by-side to the checkered flag, cars crashing behind them, Clint Bowyer crossing the finish line on his roof and fire coming from the engine.

Daniel McFadin: In person: Last fall’s Martinsville race. Sure, the Chase Elliott/Denny Hamlin incident was all anyone remembers. But don’t forget the massive pile-up on the frontstretch coming to the checkered flag. Even though it’s a short track, that was out of character for Martinsville. From home: I already used the 2012 Watkins Glen race for an answer a few weeks ago, so I’m going with the Xfinity Series here. The bizarre finish at Iowa in 2011 when Ricky Stenhouse Jr. lost his engine hundreds of feet from the checkered flag and was rammed from behind by teammate Carl Edwards, which pushed him across the finish line for the win.

Dan Beaver: I have to go with one of the greatest finishes from earlier in the week. Ricky Craven and Kurt Busch crashing as they crossed the finish line – and providing a photo finish in the process – has to be one of the best finishes ever.

NASCAR America: NASCAR’s best finishes

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Where does the Overton’s 400 at Chicagoland Speedway fit among NASCAR’s best finishes?

Somewhere close to the top of the list, according to NASCAR America’s analysts. But it is not the only exciting finish seen in the past couple of decades.

Richard Petty and David Pearson’s accident coming to the finish line in the 1976 Daytona 500 ranks at the top.

“They both blamed each other for this wreck. Imagine that, things never change,” Jeff Burton said of the incident.

Pearson won over Petty.

The 2001 Cracker Barrel Old Country Store 500 featured a win by Kevin Harvick “in a photo finish over Jeff Gordon in a very emotional victory for everyone in NASCAR,” according to Parker Kligerman.

Burton described a race in which he watched the finish from the cockpit: the 2003 Carolina Dodge Dealers 400 at Darlington Raceway in which Ricky Craven and Kurt Busch wrecked as they took the checkers.

“These guys, off turn 4 at Darlington. Just unbelievable contact, side-by-side,” Burton said. “And they kept wrecking. The race is over and they’re still wrecking. What I love about this race is the same thing we saw this past week. Both of these guys recognized they were part of an unbelievable experience.”

Kyle Busch factored into the last lap of the 2012 Finger Lakes 355 at the Glen, but he would not be part of the race to the checkers. With oil on the track from a blown engine by Bobby Labonte, Brad Keselowski ran into the back of Busch and sent him spinning. Keselowski and Marcos Ambrose battled to the checkers with Ambrose scoring his second Cup win.

For more, watch the video above.

Follow Dan Beaver on Twitter.

NASCAR America: Road racing’s evolution is not yet complete

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In this week’s Bump & Run feature, questions were posed about the most memorable moments in road course history and whether NASCAR should run a race on a street circuit. That provided an opportunity for Kyle Petty and Jeff Burton to share their thoughts on the matter in Tuesday’s edition of NASCAR America.

Petty went deep in the vault to the days when NASCAR ran Riverside International Raceway for his most memorable memory.

“I’d never seen a road course in my life; I’m in the third grade,” Petty said. “Dan Gurney is there driving the 121 car. … You watch Gurney – and my Dad took us up to the races and he’s like, watch this guy. That was a road racer. That’s what road racing was. And it was amazing to watch (A.J.) Foyt, amazing to watch those guys when I was eight or nine years old.”

Burton’s memory was not of a specific race, but rather the transition of the sport.

“It’s watching the evolution of road racing,” Burton said. “In regard to Cup drivers, Cup teams. There was a time when they would bring the ringers in. The guys would come in that were road racers. They would contend to win – not sure that they ever won – but contend to win. … The Cup guys have evolved to be so good at what they do – and they know these cars so much better than the guys that come in. The evolution of how teams and drivers look at road racing is fascinating.”

Perhaps that evolution is not complete. Burton would like to see NASCAR compete on a street course, but doesn’t think the answer is particularly easy.

“The thing about a Cup car is they are so heavy, you need a certain amount of street to be able to make racing happen,” Burton said. “So much left, right, left ,right, they can’t really ever get racing; with a Cup car at some point you need some speed.”

“I’d love to see it with this car,” Petty said. “I don’t think we could have done it in the early 2000s; I don’t think we could have done it in the ’90s, I don’t think we could have done it in the ’80s with those cars. But with this car I think it’s possible.”

For more, watch the above video.

Kyle Larson wants to compete in World of Outlaws full-time ‘before I’m 40’

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Late last year Kyle Larson said his main career goal was to compete full-time in the World of Outlaws and that “NASCAR’s just the step to get there.”

Now the 25-year-old Cup driver has told the Internet that he hopes to compete full-time in World of Outlaws “Before I’m 40.”

In a lengthy Q&A session, Larson answered a fan’s question about the topic.

It was on the official World of Outlaws podcast in December where Larson expressed his desire to eventually transition to World of Outlaws.

“NASCAR is where I wanted to make it, but I would have been perfectly fine if I didn’t make it either,” Larson said. “I’d probably be on the Outlaw (sprint car) tour probably right now, racing and loving life … I would say racing on the World of Outlaws tour full-time is my main goal.”

A lot can change between now and 2033 – which would put Larson at 18 full-time Cup seasons after 2032 – so better stock up on those Larson race win diecasts while you can over the next 15 or so years.

Here’s other tidbits from Larson’s Q&A session:

Larson declared his stance on last year’s peaceful protests by NFL players regarding police brutality and unequal treatment of African-Americans that took place during the National Anthem.

Last September, President Donald Trump praised NASCAR in general and its “supporters and fans,” saying “They won’t put up with disrespecting our Country or our Flag!”

That was after team owner Richard Childress and Richard Petty said they would fire any employees who kneeled during the anthem in protest.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. later tweeted in support of the protests and Jimmie Johnson also said he supported peaceful protests.

Larson’s response was noted by other NASCAR drivers.

If you’ve noticed Larson isn’t running against the wall as much this season, there’s a reason.

Larson believes the Cup Series needs more short tracks to garner more excitement and that the cars are not the problem.

Larson also expressed a desire for there to be mid-week races on the schedule.

Larson is not planning on competing in the Camping World Truck Series race at Eldora Speedway, which he won in 2016.

Larson thinks a Truck race at Knoxville Raceway, the dirt track that hosts the Knoxville Nationals, would be worthwhile.

Larson also announced where he’ll be competing in some sprint races later this year.