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NASCAR teams, groups approved for millions in federal COVID-19 loans

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Several NASCAR teams and related organizations were approved for between $150,000 and $10 million in loans under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPE), according to data provided Monday.

The U.S. Small Business Administration posted a list of PPP loan data on the U.S. Department of the Treasury website. The Paycheck Protection Program was included in the Coronavirus Aid Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act that was established to help businesses weather the financial stress of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Among the many NASCAR teams, racetracks and related organizations (with data including the range of the loan and the number of jobs retained):

* Richard Childress Racing ($5-$10 million, 334 jobs)

* Chip Ganassi Racing with Felix Sabates ($2-5 million, 179 jobs)

* Roush Fenway Racing ($2-5 million, 179 jobs)

* Roush & Yates Racing Engines ($2-5 million, 192 jobs)

* JTG Daugherty Racing ($1-2 million, 88 jobs)

* GMS Racing ($1-$2 million, 89 jobs)

* Kyle Busch Motorsports ($1-$2 million, 71 jobs)

* JR Motorsports ($1-$2 million, 88 jobs)

* Germain Racing ($350,000-$1 million, 41 jobs)

* Richard Petty Motorsports ($350,000-$1 million, 43 jobs)

* Dale Earnhardt Inc. ($350,000-$1 million, 55 jobs)

* DGR-Crosley ($350,000-$1 million, 67 jobs)

* Premium Motorsports ($350,000-$1 million, 46 jobs)

* Pocono International Raceway ($350,000-$1 million, 142 jobs)

* Hattori Racing ($150,000-$350,000, 16 jobs)

* Jimmie Johnson Racing ($150,00-$350,000, 8 jobs)

* Motor Racing Outreach ($150,000-$350,000, 9 jobs)

* Rev Racing ($150,000-$350,000, 12 jobs)

* Starcom Racing ($150,000-$350,000, 20 jobs)

* Kaulig Racing ($350,000-$1 million, 36 jobs)

* Mesa Marin Raceway ($150,000-$350,000, 16 jobs)

* Bill McAnally Racing ($150,000-$350,000, 19 jobs)

* Young’s Motorsports ($150,000-$350,000, 0 jobs)

* JD Motorsports ($150,000-$350,000, 0 jobs)

In a statement accompanying the data, the SBA said the data was for businesses that were approved for PPP loans but “does not reflect a determination by SBA that the borrower is eligible for a PPP loan or entitled to loan forgiveness. All PPP loans are subject to SBA review, and all loans over $2 million will automatically be reviewed.”

Contributing: Nate Ryan

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Xfinity drivers chase historic checkered flag at Indy

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Chase Briscoe said in February that there was no reason he couldn’t win a quarter of the Xfinity races this year.

Even as he focused on becoming the series’ dominant driver, he concentrated on another goal — winning the inaugural Xfinity race on Indianapolis Motor Speedway’s road course (3 p.m. ET Saturday on NBC).

A win this weekend for the series points leader would compliment the four Xfinity victories he’s scored this year and the six he has in his career, which includes winning the inaugural Charlotte Roval Xfinity race in 2018. 

Briscoe has practiced weekly for the Indy road course race on the Ford simulator since February.

“Every Wednesday I’ve been running at least an hour and a half to two hours at Indy, just trying to get prepared for the racetrack,” the Indiana native said.

“I feel like I’ve got a pretty good idea of where to make speed. It’s hard to really say how much the simulator will correlate over to the real-life thing, but I feel like I have a really good general idea of what to do, and I’m not going to be lost for those first couple of laps.”

The only NASCAR driver who has tested the road course is Matt DiBenedetto. He drove a Team Penske Xfinity car in a January test, compiling data for all teams. DiBenedetto said he is looking forward to watching Saturday’s race.

“I’m super-jealous of those guys,” he said. “They’re going to have a blast. That course is awesome. It’s so much fun, has really good passing zones, so I’m going to be watching really closely.”

Briscoe’s challenge won’t be just with the 14-turn, 2.439-mile course that winds through Indianapolis Motor Speedway’s infield and includes the tracks famous frontstretch. Among his key foes are expected to be Austin Cindric and AJ Allmendinger.

Cindric and Allmendinger combined to win three of the four Xfinity road course races last year. Cindric won at Watkins Glen and Mid-Ohio. Allmendinger won at the Charlotte Roval.

Cindric said that there is extra meaning this weekend because of the uncertainty of the Xfinity schedule beyond this month. All four series road course events last year were held after July. NASCAR has not announced the Xfinity schedule for the rest of the season beyond July.

“It’s no (surprise) that the road courses are … a strong suit for our team, and we don’t know how many of those are left,” he said.

Cindric says that Saturday’s race on the Indy road course will be fun and notes the passing zones.

“I think it’s going to be the best layout as far as passing goes that NASCAR goes to,” he said. “You’ve got two really great passing zones at the end of the both straightaways, that’s something you can’t really say about the Roval and Watkins Glen, those races are better for other reasons.”

Allmendinger should be formidable foe for Cindric, Briscoe and others based on his road course experience. Ross Chastain said Allmendinger has been a key asset for Kaulig Racing as it prepared for this event.

“AJ Allmendinger has definitely led the charge for drivers to drive the simulator and he’s built out our setups and what we should feel on those rigs with Team Chevy and (Richard Childress Racing),” Chastain said.

Allmendinger is more motivated to win at Indy than just to win the inaugural Xfinity race on the road course.

“There are very places … when you go to a racetrack that has so much history behind it, whether it’s IndyCars or stock cars, whatever its may be, you say the word, Indy and people that aren’t in motorsports understand what the history is being that racetrack,” he said.

“I want to be a part of that history. It would be something special to kiss the bricks, even if we had to do it with masks on. I don’t care. I’ll kiss them with the mask on.”

But he’ll first have to get through the two-day weekend for the series. With running on the road course for the first time, teams will have two practices Friday. That will be key for drivers, including Jeremy Clements, who won at Road America in 2017.

“I don’t know anything about (the track),” Clements said. “We don’t have any simulators or any of that stuff. Kind of going in blind. So I’m going to be a little behind there.”

One thing he is certain of, though.

“I think it will be a survival type race,” he said.

Briscoe just hopes he’s first to drive past the checkered flag. He admits, should he do so, it will feel different because fans, including friends and family, will not be allowed at the track this weekend because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I hate, first off, that there’s not going to be fans at Indianapolis just because when I go there, there are so many people that come from my hometown (Mitchell, Indiana) and from my area that don’t get to see me race anywhere else. 

“Just feeling the support every time I go there is so special. Last year in driver’s intros when we were riding around in the trucks, I literally had tears in my eyes just the amount of people that were standing up and cheering for me. It wouldn’t suck to win Indy without fans, but it would be bittersweet because none of my family would be there, none of the fans that don’t get to watch me anywhere else (would be there). I’m not going to turn away a win at Indy just because there are no fans, but it is tough to go there and not have fans.”

Tyler Reddick, Austin Dillon complete special day for RCR

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A day of promise began with an unforgettable moment. By the time the clock passed midnight, a special day had ended for both of Richard Childress Racing’s drivers.

Rookie Tyler Reddick finished a career-high fourth at Homestead-Miami Speedway, and teammate Austin Dillon placed seventh.

Sunday marked the first time since the July 2018 Daytona race that RCR had two cars finish in the top 10. The last time two RCR cars finished in the top 10 at a track other than Daytona or Talladega? That was 2017 at Darlington.

But before the day’s results would be recorded as among the team’s highlights, Sunday began with the birth of Dillon’s son.

Ace Dillon arrived at 6:30 a.m. Sunday. He weighed 9.1 pounds and was 21.5 inches. Austin Dillon spent a few hours with his son and wife Whitney before flying to Miami for the race.

Austin Dillon with wife Whitney after the birth of their son Ace. (Photo: Austin Dillon)

“You’re just kind of like starry-eyed kids and you feel like you are 18 years old, but it ain’t that way anymore and you’re about to get ready to have a baby,” Dillon told NBC Sports of arriving at the hospital early Sunday morning. “It was funny on the way in, it was kind of surreal. We go through the process and the baby comes out into the world and it just blows your mind.”

Dillon said mother and son were fine afterward, noting “Ace was a stud.”

But Dillon had to leave by about 10 a.m. to go to the airport for his flight. He made it to the track about halfway through the Xfinity race and had time for a quick nap.

While this day had been circled for his son’s birth, Sunday also had special meaning for Reddick. It marked the return to the South Florida track that witnessed Reddick’s victories and Xfinity championships the past two seasons. Few drivers seemed to have been such a perfect fit for this 1.5-mile track as Reddick, who helped revolutionize running along the wall in the Xfinity Series.

Expectations were high for Reddick. He delivered with his first Cup top-five finish. But when it was over, Reddick had mixed emotions.

“I feel like if I could have just gotten ahead of those guys, what if, right?” Reddick told NBC Sports after the race. “I was definitely a little tighter than I needed to be. That was going to make it very challenging for me.

Tyler Reddick’s fourth-place finish was the best result by a Cup rookie at Miami since 2007. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)

“We thought we were going to make the right adjustment to help us, but we couldn’t quite get our Chevy Cares Camaro to rotate better into Turn 1 like we have been wanting. We really couldn’t find that answer and, unfortunately, I think that is what held us back from being able to break through tonight.”

The more Reddick runs at the front, the more experience he and his team gain in making the right adjustments to take command late in a race.

“It’s me trying to figure out what I can do to the car to make it better,” he said. “It’s (crew chief Randall Burnett) figuring out what adjustments, what knobs can he turn better. On the Xfinity car we kind of had that notebook, we kind of knew what we could do to make those adjustments that I needed.

“On these Cup cars, they just drive a little bit differently. Because of that, it’s kind of like starting from scratch for him and myself and trying to predict that next step the track takes with the 400- and 500-mile races that we have and understanding that the next step is going to be another learning curve we’re going to have to tackle.”

Still, Reddick couldn’t be too down, saluting his pit crew’s performance. Reddick also was happy with something he didn’t do Sunday night while running close to the wall.

“i don’t feel like I stepped over the edge and made the Tyler Reddick rookie mistake,” he said. “Granted that could have been very well what held me back from being that little more aggressive to win the race, but it was going to be hard (to gain to pass the leaders late). I was just trying to play it smart. I guess that’s the biggest thing, I didn’t do anything extremely stupid to on the racetrack hurt our car, damage it or back us up through the day. We were able to get to the front and stay there. That made for a much smoother day than we’ve had in the past when we’ve gotten the good runs.”

Sunday’s race wasn’t easy for Dillon. His car’s handling was off early and he complained about it to crew chief Justin Alexander. The proper adjustments helped but NASCAR penalized Dillon for an uncontrolled tire on a pit stop. That dropped Dillon from fifth to 26th on Lap 175 of the 267-lap race.

Austin Dillon rallied from a pit road penalty to finish seventh. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Dillon climbed into the top 20 on Lap 184. He moved to 15th on Lap 195. He was 10th by Lap 211. After green-flag pit stops, he was back to 10th on Lap 219 and stayed inside the top 10 the rest of the race.

“We ended up having a very fast car,” Dillon said. “At the end of the race, we were a top-four car. The pit road penalty with the loose tire getting away, that hurt us, but we were able to drive from dead last up to seventh and you don’t usually do that. That was pretty special to get a seventh-place finish with the day that we had with having baby Ace. I was very pumped for that. Reddick had a good run also.”

While Richard Childress Racing had one of its better days in recent seasons, Dillon suggested more such days could be coming.

“I feel like people have been sleeping on us a little bit,” he said. “Since we came back from the quarantine, our No. 3 team has been pretty stout. We had an up-and-down race at Darlington, the first one we were good, the second one we were OK. Past that, the Charlotte races we flexed our muscles.”

Dillon finished 14th in the Coca-Cola 600.  He followed it by placing eighth at the second Charlotte race, sixth at Bristol and 11th at Atlanta before finishing 37th at Martinsville after exiting the car early when he was overcome by fumes after early damage.

“We’ve had good cars for the last couple of weeks and it’s been fun to be a part of,” Dillon said. “I feel like we’ve got a good group, the 8 and the 3.”

Bump and Run: Who will be next to win?

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Martin Truex Jr., Ryan Blaney, Kyle Busch, Kurt Busch, Jimmie Johnson and Aric Almirola, Clint Bowyer and Erik Jones have yet to win this season. Who is next to win?

Dustin Long: Based on performance at Auto Club Speedway, which had high tire wear, Jimmie Johnson wins this weekend at Atlanta Motor Speedway, which has high tire wear. Johnson’s teammate, Alex Bowman dominated the weekend, so Hendrick Motorsports may have found something on tracks with high tire wear. Remember, Johnson was strong early in the first Darlington race before crashing less than a lap from winning the first stage.

Daniel McFadin: My gut says Kyle Busch, but I can’t help but think Jimmie Johnson is on the verge of his first victory since 2017. He’s fast, Kyle Busch is getting faster. Whoever can have a flawless race first will be in Victory Lane.

Jerry Bonkowski: I’m most surprised that defending Cup champ Kyle Busch has yet to win this season, with Truex another anomaly. I also thought Jimmie Johnson would finally break his winless streak by now — albeit he has shown some good signs — so I believe it will only be a period of time for that to happen.

NASCAR has had two midweek Cup races and has another scheduled June 10 at Martinsville, what are your thoughts on the concept?

Dustin Long: I liked the previous midweek races because of the shorter distances. That put a greater emphasis on running a mistake-free race. Last Sunday’s Bristol race featured some drivers recovering from penalties or issues to score top-10 finishes in a full-length race and that’s fine, but I also like to see a race where you can’t afford a mistake because there’s little time for recovery. I think the midweek races provide a change of pace that is good for the sport.

Daniel McFadin: Can it please not rain on June 10? For the most part I think the midweek races have been successful. Had rain and lightning not impacted both races, I can’t help but feel they’d have had bigger impacts. While the Martinsville race will be of normal length, shorter races ramp up tension and results in more exciting competition. I’m looking forward to June 10 … if it doesn’t rain.

Jerry Bonkowski: I’ve long advocated midweek, primetime races. I’ve definitely enjoyed what I’ve seen so far. The key is to have midweek races only in major markets to minimize the losses that invariably would come from races in smaller markets. If the NFL can have Monday Night Football, why can’t we have Wednesday (or Thursday) Night NASCAR?

The Cup series has run nine of 36 races, meaning a quarter of the season is gone. What do you make of the season’s first quarter?

Dustin Long: The return of Hendrick Motorsports. Aided by the new Camaro, Hendrick cars have been fast and been in position to win a majority of the races this season. Other Chevy teams also are benefitting. Chip Ganassi Racing and Richard Childress Racing also have had some top-10 finishes. Chevy teams have bypassed the Toyota brigade, which dominated last year. But this is only the first quarter. Let’s see what happens in the coming weeks.

Daniel McFadin: It’s been wildly unpredictable, especially the five Cup races since the break. While drivers have dominated individual races, Kevin Harvick‘s win at Darlington is the only one that seemed like a relatively runaway victory. The others have essentially seen each winner have the victory fall into their lap. It’s had a chaotic feel and given the world we’ve been living in since March, that’s appropriate.

Jerry Bonkowski: It has been a most unusual first quarter, for sure, what with the pandemic, the hiatus and return among other things. I’m surprised that Toyota has struggled, with only two wins to date (as has Chevrolet), while Ford has dominated with five wins, including two wins each from Team Penske drivers Brad Keselowski and Joey Logano. Defending champ Kyle Busch has also uncharacteristically struggled at times.

Bump and Run: Key connection between recent Cup winners

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The first three races since Cup season resumed featured no practice and veterans Kevin Harvick, Denny Hamlin and Brad Keselowski winning. Is this coincidence or is there a connection?

Dustin Long: The key is that these drivers and teams have put themselves in position to win those races. Kevin Harvick had a fast car and took advantage of the No. 1 pit stall at Darlington. Denny Hamlin benefitted from a strong car and good strategy at Darlington. Brad Keselowski bettered Jimmie Johnson on a late restart when Johnson had control as the leader, and Keselowski kept Johnson from taking the lead from him on the final restart. You expect top teams to do well when there’s no practice.

Daniel McFadin: While I can see the advantage to being a long-term veteran during the current situation, I think it’s mostly coincidental. Alex Bowman has been very competitive in two of the three races and he has far less experience than the three drivers who have won so far. 

Jerry Bonkowski: Veterans are expected to do the best and be the best because of their overall experience. So, no, I’m not surprised that they’ve emerged victorious. It’s more a connection based upon experience rather than a coincidence, in my opinion.

 

How would you rate Hendrick Motorsports’ performance in the first three races since the Cup season resumed?

Dustin Long: Above average but there is a level of disappointment. While there’s nothing Chase Elliott can do about being wrecked late at Darlington, there are some issues for each team. For as fast as the Hendrick cars have been, the inability to finish off races stands out from Alex Bowman and his team not able to keep his car fast all night at Charlotte and Darlington to the decision to pit Elliott out of the lead before the overtime restart at the Coke 600 to William Byron not able to have a complete race since the season resumed to Jimmie Johnson losing a lead on a late restart in the Coke  600. There are enough areas for each team to address.

Daniel McFadin:  With three laps to go Sunday night I would have given Hendrick an 8 out of 10. But after Jimmie Johnson’s car was disqualified, I’d drop it down to a 6. While Byron has a stage win, he hasn’t finished better than 12th. Bowman has finished in the top 10 in seven stages, won two and led 205 laps but has finishes of second, 18th and 19th. Throw in Johnson’s DNF in the first Darlington race and Elliott’s problems in the last two races, and it’s a very mixed bag.

Jerry Bonkowski: Tough luck but with signs of promise, most notably for Chase Elliott and Jimmie Johnson. Yes, both have done well but also have had issues, but I also believe that they will be able to build upon the difficulties they’ve had – Elliott getting booted by Kyle Busch, Johnson spinning at the first Darlington and being DQ’d after the Coke 600 – and will both ultimately wind up in victory lane sooner rather than later.

 

After Simon Pagenaud won last year’s Indianapolis 500, car owner Roger Penske said the free agent “absolutely” would be back with the team. Brad Keselowski gave Penske his first Coca-Cola 600 win since 2010 and second overall. What do you believe are the chances that Keselowski, a free agent after this season, returns to Team Penske?

Dustin Long: It’s as Brad Keselowski said after his Coca-Cola 600 win when asked about his future: “It’s not all up to me. A lot of things have to come together, whether it’s sponsors or whatnot, management things. That hasn’t happened yet.”

Daniel McFadin: I’m skeptical of him returning to drive the No. 2. Penske almost instantly committed to bringing Pagenaud back after he swept the Month of May following a winless year. Keselowski’s won three races in each of the last three seasons (including Penske’s first Darlington win since 1975 and his first Brickyard 400), plus his win Sunday night. The fact Keselowski’s future is still up in the air at this point when Penske has already re-signed Ryan Blaney (who has won once in each of the last three years) is a truly odd situation.

Jerry Bonkowski: I’d like to say Keselowski will remain a Team Penske driver for the rest of his Cup career. But on the flip side, can Keselowski potentially enjoy greater on-track success – and earn more money – if he goes to another team, most notably Hendrick Motorsports with Jimmie Johnson retiring at the end of this season? Keselowski could be the most valuable free agent since Kevin Harvick when he left Richard Childress Racing. But Keselowski is also known for his loyalty, much like Roger Penske is loyal to his drivers, so I won’t be surprised if Keselowski stays with the No. 2 team going forward.