Red Horse Racing

Brad Keselowski Racing to cease operations in Truck Series after this season

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Brad Keselowski Racing announced Thursday it will cease operations after this season, ending a run in the Camping World Truck Series that began in 2008.

The two-truck team fields entries for Chase Briscoe and Austin Cindric.

“The Truck Series is truly special to me given my family’s ties to the history of the sport, and this decision comes with much contemplation. But, for a number of reasons, and as I plan for the long-term future, I’ve decided not to field a team in 2018,” Brad Keselowski said in a press release.

“My goal with BKR was to create a top-tier team which would allow me to give back to the sport by creating opportunities and quality experience for others, whether they be drivers, mechanics, engineers, or support personnel. With outstanding leadership from BKR GM Jeremy Thompson, assistance from Team Penske, and the support of our long-time partners Cooper Standard and Horizon Global, we were able to successfully achieve this goal. I am very proud of this and intend to do my best to help my BKR team members stay and grow in the sport. I am also incredibly appreciative of the great relationships we have developed with our partners over the years.”

The team has earned nine series wins – none this year.

“The team has also provided me with meaningful experience as a team owner,” Keselowski said. “I’ve never made it a secret that I would eventually like to be an owner at the top-level of the sport. And, while this is many years down the line, I want to start to prepare for that possibility now. Part of that preparation is seeking to develop an advanced engineering and manufacturing company that would be housed out of our 78,000 square foot facility in Statesville and ultimately help to support this vision.”

Soon after the announcement, Keselowski published a blog about the decision. He said having to tell his team it was shutting down was “one of the most difficult things I’ve ever done.”

Keselowski went on to share how his time driving for Roger Penske has shaped his outlook on his future ownership goals.

“One of the things I’ve learned from Roger Penske is the importance of having a successful core business outside of motorsports,” Keselowski wrote. “If you have a successful business venture outside of motorsports, you can kind of roll with the ebbs and flows of the sport as an owner. That’s the position I want to be in, and that I’ll need to be in to be an owner who lasts in NASCAR.”

BKR joins Red Horse Racing in ending its operations in the Truck Series. Red Horse Racing competed in the first five races of the season before shutting down. The teams combined to have two of the eight drivers in last year’s Truck playoffs.

Keselowski’s decision comes after he’s repeatedly talked about the costs of owning a Truck team.

“It’s a money loser,’’ Keselowski told NBC Sports earlier this year. “Big time.’’

In 2014, Keselowski told NBC Sports’ Dustin Long his team lost $1 million that season. Keselowski also said when he would know it would be time to no longer own a Truck team.

“I’m not interested in being involved in the Truck Series if I don’t feel like we can be competitive,” Keselowski said. “My breaking point is two areas – it’s going broke and not being competitive. We have to walk that line every day with every decision we make.”

Four drivers have earned BKR’s nine wins. Ryan Blaney (four wins), Tyler Reddick (three wins), Joey Logano (one win) and Keselowski (one win). Keselowski won his only Truck Series race in 66 starts in 2014 at Bristol.

Drivers who have competed for BKR include NBCSN’s Parker Kligerman (37 races), Ryan Blaney (58 races), Dave Blaney (one race), Logano (six races), Reddick (62 races), Ross Chastain (14 races), Daniel Hemric (23 races), Austin Theriault (10 races) and Alex Tagliani (two races).

Truck teams racing as much for cash as checkered flag

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DOVER, Del. — The green flag will fly today for the Camping World Truck Series and some teams could be further in the red by the time the checkered flag waves.

A series that debuted with four demonstration races in 1994 sees its teams battle financial challenges while facing questions about a schedule that has veered from its grassroots beginning.

Brad Keselowski understands all too well what team owners face. He said his truck operation lost $1 million in the 2014 season and says that’s still the average for his organization, which has five victories since 2015.

“It’s a money loser,’’ Keselowski told NBC Sports. “Big time.’’

If an organization lost $1 million in a season (23 races this year), that would equate to losing more than $43,000 per race on average.

Red Horse Racing, which was in its 13th season in the series, suspended operations May 22 after struggling to find sponsorship. It made that move even though Timothy Peters was fifth in the points at the time.

Kyle Busch says it costs $3.2 million a year to run a full-season Truck team at Kyle Busch Motorsports and he has to put some of his own money into the operation. Keselowski says the cost is closer to $4.5 million to run a full-season Truck team, counting reinvested purse money and manufacturer support.

It is amid those challenge that former Truck owner Kevin Harvick recently suggested on his SiriusXM NASCAR Radio show that the series run at more short tracks — as it did in its early years — to help NASCAR reconnect with grassroots racing fans and give the series a stronger identity.

“I think it’s something that a lot of people want to say and haven’t said, but I think it’s definitely time to look at the grassroots sides of things, and I think the Truck series is a grassroots division,’’ Harvick said last week at Charlotte Motor Speedway.

“I’m not saying we need to take them from Daytona or Phoenix or some of these other places, but there are some places that they don’t need to be going.’’

On his radio show, he mentioned Dover — site of today’s race — as one of those places.

“They don’t want to show up on a Friday at Dover and watch these trucks drive around the race track because they’re going to show up on Sunday to watch the Cup cars,’’ Harvick said. “Take the trucks somewhere where everybody wants to see them, because there’s short tracks across the country that want to see them.’’

Busch likes the idea.

“I would definitely enjoy that model of going back to those race tracks,’’ he said. “Now again, how you accomplish that and how you get that done, that’s for people a hell of a lot smarter than me to figure out.

“But I would certainly enjoy seeing the Truck Series go back to Tucson, or even around here, go to Motor Mile, go to some of these short tracks that you can put 10, 15, 20,000 people in the stands for an exciting truck race.

“Because in all honesty, that’s the crowd count that you’re getting at a mile‑and‑a‑half anyways, so pack the place, make it look good, and put on a good show for the fans and go back to some of the roots of short track racing that these drivers are coming up from.’’

If NASCAR went to some smaller tracks, it might have to lower sanctioning fees and that could mean a smaller purse for teams.

“If we make less money, you’re digging our grave, so the sanctioning agreements can’t be for any less money, that’s for sure,’’ Busch said. “We actually need them to be for more. In order to cut our costs, we need to be able to make more money or compete for more money to race for more winnings. If you cut our winnings out, you might as well just say goodbye.’’

Keselowski said that even when Brad Keselowski Racing wins, it doesn’t cut the spending deficit in a weekend by much.

“If we win the race it is, at best, and this is at best, about 5 percent of what we spent (that weekend),’’ he said.

But Keselowski said that there is a way the finances could work for teams even if with smaller purses.

With more short tracks, Keselowski said, engines are not as great a factor and money can be saved there. Also, more short tracks would make aero development less important and that might be another area to save money.

“I’m a big believer you can’t cut your way to prosperity,’’ he said,“but you can make smart decisions.’’

The race is on to make those decisions before more teams end up like Red Horse Racing and are faced with leaving the sport.

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Red Horse Racing suspends operations

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Red Horse Racing, which has competed in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series since 2005, has suspended operations.

The organization, which reached the championship race last year with Timothy Peters, had 16 career victories. The team laid off 30 employees along with Peters and driver Brett Moffitt, a team official told NBC Sports. The team has kept a core group of employees as it seeks funding to resume operations.

Peters finished fifth in Friday night’s race at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Moffitt placed 18th. Peters is sixth in the points and Moffitt is 10th. Neither truck has had a primary sponsor listed in all five races this season. 

Peters won at least one race for the organization from 2009-15. In 2012, the organization finished second in the owner points with four drivers scoring wins: Peters (two wins), Todd Bodine (one), John King (one) and Parker Kligerman (one).

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Brett Moffitt returns to Red Horse Racing for first two Truck races of season

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Brett Moffitt will drive a second entry for Red Horse Racing in the first two races of the Camping World Truck Series this season.

Moffitt, the 2015 Cup Series Rookie of the Year, will drive the No. 7 truck for the team at Daytona International Speedway and Atlanta Motor Speedway. Timothy Peters returns to the No. 17 truck.

The 24-year-old driver competed in six races last year for Red Horse Racing in the place of Matt Tifft. The Iowa-native earned his first national NASCAR win in August at Michigan International Speedway when he passed Peters coming to the checkered flag.

The No. 7 team will be led by crew chief Butch Hylton, who has eight wins in both the Xfinity and Truck Series.

The Truck season begins on Feb. 24 with the Next Era Energy Resources 250 at Daytona.

Brett Moffitt picks up three more Truck races with Red Horse Racing

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After subbing for Matt Tifft for two races in the No. 11 Toyota in the Camping World Truck Series, Red Horse Racing has announced Brett Moffitt will be back in the truck for the next three races.

Moffitt, the 2015 Sprint Cup Rookie of the Year, will drive the No. 11 at Bristol Motor Speedway (Aug. 17), Michigan International Speedway (Aug. 27) and Canadian Tire Motorsports Park (Sept. 4).

Tifft is out indefinitely, recovering from brain surgery to remove a low-grade tumor.

Moffitt drove the No. 11 at Kentucky Speedway and at Pocono Raceway. The Iowa native started second at Kentucky but fell victim to engine failure. At Pocono, Moffitt took the No. 11 from 15th to third for his best finish in four career Truck starts.

“Brett has done a great job in the No. 11 so far and we’re glad to welcome him back to the team for the next three races,” said team owner Tom DeLoach in a press release. “Hopefully we can continue to ride the momentum that (crew chief) Scott Zipadelli and the team have built and get to Victory Lane.”

After his Rookie of the Year honors last year, the two Truck starts are Moffitt’s only NASCAR starts this season.

This season the No. 11 has been piloted by Moffitt, Tifft (three races), German Quiroga (three races), Ben Kennedy (three races) and  Jake Griffin (one race).