Jeff Gordon among nominees for 2019 NASCAR Hall of Fame class

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Four-time champion Jeff Gordon headlines the list of nominees for the 2019 NASCAR Hall of Fame class, which was announced Tuesday on NASCAR America.

Gordon, who ranks third on the Cup all-time wins list with 93 and helped broaden the sport’s appeal, is in his first year of eligibility.

Should he be among the five selected for the 2019 Hall of Fame Class, he would follow team owner Rick Hendrick (2017 class) and crew chief Ray Evernham (2018 class).

There are 20 nominees for the class. Fifteen are holdovers from last year. Gordon is among the five new names to the list. Voting is expected to take place in May with the class inducted in January 2019.

Joining Gordon, 46, as first-time nominees are: Harry Gant, John Holman, Ralph Moody and Kirk Shelmerdine.

Gant, 78, competed in NASCAR from 1973-94, winning 18 races and 17 poles. He won four consecutive races in September 1991. He remains the oldest Cup winner. He was 52 years, 7 months, 6 days when he won at Michigan in August 1992. He’s also the oldest pole winner in series history. He was 54 years, 7 months and 17 days when he won the pole at Bristol in August 1994.

Shelmerdine, who turns 60 on Thursday, won four championships as crew chief for Dale Earnhardt in 1986-87 and 1990-91.

Holman and Moody formed one of the sport’s most famous teams. Between 1957-73, Moody and Holman built cars that earned 83 poles and won 96 times. They won the 1968 and ’69 titles with David Pearson. Holman died in 1975. Moody died in 2004.

The other 15 nominees from last year are:

Davey Allison … 19-time Cup winner who won the 1992 Daytona 500. He was the 1987 Rookie of the Year. He died in a helicopter crash in 1993 at Talladega.

Buddy Baker … 19-time Cup winner who won the 1980 Daytona 500. He was the first driver to eclipse the 200 mph barrier, doing so in 1970.

Red Farmer … Records are incomplete but the 1956 modified and 1969-71 Late Model Sportsman champ is believed to have won well more than 700 races. Continued racing beyond 80 years old.

Ray Fox … Renowned engine builder, car owner and race official. He built the Chevrolet that Junior Johnson won the 1960 Daytona 500 driving. Fox won the 1964 Southern 500 as a car owner with Johnson as his driver.

Joe Gibbs … His organization has 148 Cup wins and four Cup titles (Bobby Labonte in 2000, Tony Stewart in 2002, 2005 and Kyle Busch in 2015).

Harry Hyde … Crew chief for Bobby Isaac when Isaac won the 1970 series title. Guided Tim Richmond, Geoff Bodine, Neil Bonnett and Dave Marcis each to their first career series win.

Alan Kulwicki … 1992 series champion who overcame a 278-point deficit in the final six races to win title by 10 points, at the time the closet margin in series history. He was the 1986 Rookie of the Year. He was killed in a plane crash in 1993.

Bobby Labonte … 2000 series champion who won 21 Cup races. He was the first driver to win an Xfinity title and a Cup championship in a career.

Hershel McGriff … Made his NASCAR debut at age 22 in the 1950 Southern 500 and ran his final NASCAR race at age 84 in 2012. Was selected as one of NASCAR’s 50 Greatest Drivers in 1998.

Roger Penske … Team owner whose organization has won 107 Cup races and one series title. Has been a car owner in auto racing for more than 50 years.

Larry Phillips … Weekly short track series driver believed to have more than 1,000 career wins. During an 11-year span, he won 220 of 289 NASCAR-sanctioned starts on short tracks.

Jack Roush … Team owner whose organization has won 137 Cup races and two series titles (Matt Kenseth in 2003 and Kurt Busch in 2004). Team has won more than 300 races across NASCAR’s three national series.

Ricky Rudd … Won 23 Cup races, including 1997 Brickyard 400. He is known most as NASCAR’s Ironman, once holding the record for consecutive starts at 788. He ranks second in all-time Cup starts with 906.

Mike Stefanik … Nine-time NASCAR champion with his titles coming in the Whelen Modified Tour and the K&N Pro Series East.

Waddell Wilson … Famed engine builder and crew chief. He supplied the power for David Pearson’s championships in 1968 and ’69 and Benny Parsons’ 1973 title. Wilson’s engines won 109 races. He won 22 races as a crew chief, including three Daytona 500 victories.

Nominees for the Landmark Award are Alvin Hawkins Sr., Barney Hall, Janet Guthrie, Jim Hunter and Ralph Seagraves.

Hawkins established Bowman Gray Stadium with NASCAR founder Bill France Sr.

Hall was a broadcaster for 54 years from 1960-2014.

Guthrie was the first woman to race in a  Cup superspeedway event.

Hunter was a journalist, track promoter and longtime NASCAR executive.

Seagraves started RJ Reynolds Tobacco Company’s sponsorship of NASCAR.

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Who might make up the NASCAR Hall of Fame Class of 2018?

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Now that the eighth class was inducted Friday into the NASCAR Hall of Fame, what’s next?

Rather, who’s next – as in who will be the next quintet of inductees in the 2018 class?

Historically, many of those who come close but fall short of being inducted one year are among the favorites for the following class.

If that holds true again when voters gather in May to select the 2018 class (the field of 20 nominees is expected to be announced late next month), several potential inductees stand out.

Team owner Robert Yates, driver/team owner Alan Kulwicki and driver Red Byron were the top vote-getters who fell short for the 2017 class but were the subject of heavy discussion during last May’s selection process. It’s likely they’ll be among those getting significant consideration by Hall voters again.

Here are some of the potential inductees I see – and why – for the class of 2018:

Allstate 400 Practice

* Robert Yates was one of the most prolific engine builders and team owners during his tenure in the sport, winning the 1999 Winston Cup championship (NASCAR Hall of Famer Dale Jarrett was the driver), while his engines helped power Darrell Waltrip and Bobby Allison to championships, as well. As an owner, his drivers won 57 Cup races. Yates belongs in the Hall – now!

Darlington Raceway Vintage Racing Festival Day 2

* Buddy Baker was a fan favorite as a driver and continued to have a big fan base when he retired from driving to become a broadcaster. While he never won a Cup championship, Baker won some of the biggest races on the circuit, including the 1980 Daytona 500 and both the World 600 and Winston 500 three times each. He was named one of NASCAR’s 50 Greatest Drivers in 1998. Will he be everyone’s Buddy among voters this year?

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* Kulwicki won the 1992 Winston Cup championship but perished in an airplane crash less than five months later. Nicknamed “The Polish Prince” and “Special K,” Kulwicki was a classic rags to riches success story whose life was embodied by his favorite song, Frank Sinatra’s “My Way.” One can only wonder how much greater success Kulwicki would have enjoyed had his life not been cut so short. There also might be sentimental reasons for Hall voters to select Kulwicki: 2018 will mark 25 years since he died.

Darlington Historic Racing Festival

* Ray Fox was a master engine builder and team owner. In 1956, working for team owner Carl Kiekhaefer, Fox built engines that won 21 of the season’s first 26 races, earning him Mechanic of the Year honors. He also built Junior Johnson’s 1960 Daytona 500 winning car, then went out on his own as an engine builder and team owner from 1962-1972, earning 14 NASCAR Grand National wins and 16 poles. After retiring and selling his team to his son, Ray Jr., Fox became a NASCAR engine inspector from 1990-1996.

Darlington Historic Racing Festival

* Harry Gant could be the biggest surprise of the class of 2018. But “Handsome Harry” certainly racked up Hall-worthy credentials in his 22-year NASCAR career, including 18 wins, 123 top-five and 208 top-10 finishes in just 474 starts. He also earned 21 Xfinity Series wins and 71 top-10s in just 128 starts. While he never won a Cup championship, he was runner-up in 1984. He also won four straight races in 1991 – at the age of 51. He retired after the 1994 season. When he visited Darlington Raceway during last year’s Throwback Weekend, Gant received one of the biggest rounds of applause of any driver past or present there. Even at the age of 77, Harry’s still as handsome and popular as ever.

57th Annual Daytona 500 - Practice

* And then there’s the wild card – but certainly deserving for induction nonetheless, Ron Hornaday Jr. One of the most versatile drivers around (he ran in NASCAR Cup, Xfinity and Truck Series), it was in a Truck that Hornaday had the most success. He won 51 races in 360 starts (an average of one win every seven starts), is the only Truck driver to win four championships (1996, 1998, 2007 and 2009) and was runner-up in 2008. Hornaday was nominated last season but didn’t make the cut. But come this May, it won’t be a shock if he does this time.

That’s how I see it. How about you? Write in Comments who you think will make the NASCAR Hall of Fame Class of 2018.

Follow @JerryBonkowski