Mobil 1

Long: Heated radio chatter raises questions about who is driving

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RICHMOND, Va. — For at least the second time this season, a crew chief told his driver to retaliate after contact from another car, raising questions about such emotional outbursts and the actions that follow.

Car owner Richard Childress and crew chief Danny Stockman each told Austin Dillon on the team’s radio to pay Alex Bowman back for an incident on the Lap 109 restart Saturday at Richmond. Bowman’s contact sent Dillon’s car into William Byron’s, causing more damage to Dillon’s No. 3 Chevrolet.

Childress told his grandson to “get (Bowman’s) ass back if you get to him.”

Stockman told Dillon:

“Get him back.

“Get him back.

“Get him back.

Get … him … back … now.”

Dillon did as told and spun Bowman but the contact also damaged Dillon’s car.

Later, as Dillon tried to dissect his car’s handling at the end of stage 2 on Lap 200, he mentioned the incident earlier in the race: “I don’t have a good idea for you. We ruined our car in a wreck for no reason. I didn’t think we needed to do that.”

Ultimately, the driver is responsible for what they do with the car. But when a driver is agitated after being hit by a competitor and told to “get him back” as Dillon was, it puts the driver in a difficult situation. Ignore the crew chief — and the car owner in this case — and it can lead to questions about team leadership among crew members and who can hear the conversations on their headsets. Do as told and it can make a bad situation worse.

It did for William Byron at Watkins Glen.

Kyle Busch spun while underneath Byron’s car in Turn 1. Busch caught Byron and hit the back of Byron’s car, forcing it through the grass in the inner loop.

Crew chief Chad Knaus told Byron on the radio: “If I see that 18 (Busch) come back around without you knocking the (expletive) out of him, we’re going to have a problem.”

Byron, following the orders of a seven-time champion crew chief, did as he was told and had a bigger problem.

Seeing Byron behind him under caution, Busch hit his brakes and Byron slammed into the back of Busch’s car. The contact smashed the nose of Byron’s car. Byron, who started second, finished 21st and was never a factor after the incident.

Byron called the Watkins Glen episode a “turning point. I realized I’m the guy driving the car and ultimately the decisions that I make … trickles down to my team and all the work they’re putting in.”

Another key is what is said on the radio and how it is said between Knaus and Byron.

“I think the only thing is just staying positive and staying motivated in the race,” Byron said. “I don’t seem to do well with like negative energy.”

How did he get his point across?

“I think situations have played out on the track to where it’s kind of been understood that we’ve got to do things a different way,” Byron said. “We both have our way of doing things. I’ve really accepted the way he does things, and he’s accepted the way I do things. Any good working relationship is kind of that compromise.”

It’s understandable that crew chiefs and teams will be upset when somebody damages their car. To have all the work that goes into each race impacted by some driver’s mistake or recklessness is frustrating and infuriating.

But for those who talk to a driver on the radio during a race comes great responsibility. One can calm a driver and focus on the task at hand or inflame the situation.

When a situation escalates, the results are never good.

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Although he tied his best finish of the season Saturday night at Richmond, placing fifth wasn’t the biggest achievement to Ryan Newman.

“What meant to me the most was just being better than we were the first race,” said Newman, who finished ninth at Richmond in the April. “We came back and showed that we were learning and we’ll keep learning.”

Such improvement has put the Roush Fenway Racing driver — who didn’t secure a playoff spot until the regular-season finale — in position to advance to the second round after Sunday’s race at Charlotte Motor Speedway’s Roval (2:30 p.m. ET on NBC). Newman enters the weekend ninth in the standings, 14 points ahead of Alex Bowman, the first driver outside a playoff spot.

Ryan Newman’s finishing position has improved 3.8 positions in the six races Cup teams have visited a track for a second time this year. (Photo by Brian Lawdermilk/Getty Images)

Newman is one of four playoff drivers — Ryan Blaney, Chase Elliott and Kyle Larson are the others — who have finished better in their second appearance at a playoff track than the first time this year. Newman’s 10th-place finish in the Las Vegas playoff opener was 14 places better than he finished there in March. His Richmond race was four spots better than his spring result.

“We hoped every time we got back (to a track a second time) we would be better,” Scott Graves, Newman’s crew chief, told NBC Sports after the Richmond race. “This was a good race for us in the spring. We took all our notes there and we knew what we needed to do differently. When you get here and you unload and the car is good right from the bat and you can just make fine adjustments, it just makes the weekend go easier. We were able to do that this time.”

Richmond marked the sixth time that Cup has raced at a track for a second time this season. The others are Daytona, Las Vegas, Bristol, Pocono and Michigan.

Newman has improved 3.8 positions the second time at those tracks, ranking fourth among playoff drivers. Newman trails Larson (gain of 11.2 positions), Martin Truex Jr. (9.2) and William Byron (4.5).

“I feel like we really struggled to figure out where the balance of the car needed to be the first time around,” Graves said. “How much drag did we need? How much downforce did we need? Then mechanically, what did we need in the car. It’s kind of like those learn-by-trial kind of things. We went, ‘OK that didn’t work but we think we know what we need now.’ ”

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The six lead changes Saturday at Richmond were the fewest there since the 2014 fall race, which had four lead changes among two drivers.

Both Richmond races this season combined for 10 cautions (five in each race). Last year’s two Richmond races combined for nine cautions.

Clint Bowyer, who finished eighth, expressed his frustration with this past weekend’s race.

We have to figure something out with this track and our package,” Bowyer said. “I’m not sold that this is the best product we can do here. I love this place. I love the race track. I love this fan base, this area and everything. Ever since I started in this sport, this has always been an action track and it’s lacking a little bit of that. 

“I think we could do some things with maybe some PJ1 or sealer or tires – something. We need to try to make an adjustment, I really believe that.”

Kevin Harvick was asked the day before last weekend’s race if traction compound should be used at Richmond to help drivers with passing.

“I honestly thought we would have traction compound down for this particular race,” he said. “Using the tire dragon here does zero.”

So where would it be best to apply traction compound at Richmond?

“Chase Elliott had the best idea, just like we used to do with the sealer, just coat the whole corner,” Harvick said. “Let it ride for the weekend. Let the race track evolve. It’s become one of the most difficult places to pass. It’s become more difficult this year. I think the traction compound would definitely be a good option.”

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Clint Bowyer is a free agent after this season but signs point to him returning to Stewart-Haas Racing next year.

Bowyer noted that he did a Mobil 1 shoot last week with Kevin Harvick for next year.

Bowyer said a new contract is “not done” but “I’m comfortable where it’s at. We’re working on partnerships for next year and having success there.”

Bowyer is in his third season at Stewart-Haas Racing, taking over the No. 14 ride after Tony Stewart retired. Bower has won twice with the team, scoring victories at Martinsville and Michigan in 2018.

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There was a buzz in the garage over the weekend about possible changes for pit stops next year in the Xfinity and Gander Outdoors Truck Series.

That buzz intensified after Michael Waltrip tweeted that stage breaks without live pit stops for the Xfinity and Truck Series would be “absolutely the right thing to do” to help teams save money while also providing more racing action.

NASCAR had no comment about the issue and Waltrip’s tweets.

It’s clear based on the chatter in the garage that NASCAR is taking a look at potential changes to pit stops. In making the switch to 18-inch wheels with the Gen 7 car, which is scheduled to debut in 2021, NASCAR also is considering the use of a single lug nut to secure wheels. Such a move would overhaul pit stops and likely de-emphasize the importance of tire changers. 

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Stewart-Haas Racing reveals Kevin Harvick’s 2019 Mobil 1 scheme

Stewart-Haas Racing
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Stewart-Haas Racing has delivered a late Christmas gift to NASCAR fans who prefer their paint schemes in the all-black variety.

On Wednesday, SHR revealed the No. 4 Mobil 1 Ford that Kevin Harvick will pilot next season and it looks mean.

While its main feature is the black finish, you’ll notice gray flames framing the hood as they shoot over the left front and right-front fenders.

The car will be featured in nine races and makes its debut March 17 at Auto Club Speedway.

Watch the clip below to see the design in all its digital glory.

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Merci! Tony Stewart prepares for retirement by learning to speak French in spoof video

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Up to now, the only thing French that Tony Stewart knew was French Fries or maybe French Toast.

But in a new series of spoof commercials from Mobil 1, Stewart tries out a few new activities to potentially pursue “the next chapter” of his life as he heads into retirement as a Sprint Cup driver at the end of this season.

Like learn French — as a language — and not as something he eats.

Check out the video below and watch as Tony (butchers) … err, shall we say, tries to learn a new language. He even wears a French beret. All we can say is, “sacre’ bleu!”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDa6wpas3jM

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Tony Stewart confirms Ty Dillon, Brian Vickers to share driving duties in No. 14

(Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images)
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Tony Stewart confirmed Friday that Ty Dillon will drive the No. 14 car when it has Bass Pro Shops sponsorship and that Brian Vickers will drive the car in other races until his return.

Vickers drove for Stewart in the Daytona 500 and is in the car this weekend at Las Vegas Motor Speedway with Mobil 1 serving as the primary sponsor. Dillon drove the car last weekend at Atlanta Motor Speedway because of Bass Pro’s sponsorship. Bass Pro, which has been affiliated with Dillon previously, is scheduled to be the car’s primary sponsor for next week’s race at Phoenix International Raceway, at Auto Club Speedway the following week and May 1 at Talladega Superspeedway.

MORE: Tony Stewart on what races he’d like to run after this year

Stewart has no timetable for when he’ll race again. He suffered a burst fracture of his L1 vertebra during a sand dunes accident on Jan. 31 and had surgery Feb. 3. He said he’s scheduled to have X-rays taken of his back Wednesday.

“The biggest concern is just making sure it heals right the first time,” Stewart said Friday.

The X-rays could provide a timeline for when Stewart returns to race this season.

“When they clear me to (race), I can promise you I’ll be ready,” Stewart said. “We’ve been through enough pain tolerance with (his broken right leg in 2013) and this.”

Stewart also said he’s hopeful NASCAR waives the requirement that a driver must start every race to be Chase eligible for him. Even so, the three-time series champion would still need to be in the top 30 in points and at earn at least one win to qualify for the Chase.

“Whatever they decide, they decide,” Stewart said of NASCAR. “I would like to think it’s going to be similar to what they did last year with Kyle (Busch).”

NASCAR waived the requirement that a driver had to start every race for Busch after he was injured in an Xfinity race the day before last year’s Daytona 500. Busch was injured when his car slammed into an unprotected concrete wall inside Turn 1. Stewart’s injury, though, came in an activity away from the track.

NASCAR also granted a waiver last year to Kurt Busch, who was suspended the first three races after a court ruling against him, and to Kyle Larson after he fainted the day before the spring Martinsville race.

Until Stewart can race, he wants to be at the track with his team even if doctors would prefer he was at home in bed or walking on a treadmill.

“I think it’s good for our team more than anything,” Stewart said of being at the track. “I want to be here to support them. I want them to know that even though I’ve kind of put them in a box again, that I’m going to be here and I’m going to be supportive. That’s a big deal to me, to be here and let those guys know I’m behind them 100 percent.”

He’s also at the track because he’s tired of being home recuperating.

“You lay around now because you’re being told to and it’s like, I can’t do it anymore,” Stewart said. “I’ve got to get up and get moving around. I’m a lot happier (at the track). I would rather be here and be in pain than be at home, be comfortable, and no pain. The pain is worth it to me. I don’t mind it.”