Long: Is Talladega supposed to look like this?

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So what is NASCAR? Is it a sport? Or is it a show?

Admittedly, those in the NASCAR offices likely will view its racing as both. But that creates a conflict over how to look at Sunday’s race at Talladega Superspeedway.

If one views it as a sporting event, Stewart-Haas Racing’s domination — qualifying all of its cars in the top four, running there much of the race and Aric Almirola winning with Clint Bowyer second — should be celebrated because SHR did what every team hopes to do every weekend.

But that performance doesn’t play well to the overall view of the race (or show). With SHR controlling the front and drivers battling ill-handling cars, the two- and three-wide racing so common at Talladega often was replaced by single-file racing.

The 15 lead changes were the fewest at Talladega since 1973.

Green flag passes — a stat NASCAR tracks based on position changes over each scoring loop on every lap — were down 54.4 percent from last fall’s playoff race at Talladega.

Think about that … lead changes at its lowest level since before any driver in Sunday’s race was born and green-flag passes down more than 50 percent from the previous year.

Is that something fans want to see more of?

Doesn’t seem to be the case based on Jeff Gluck’s weekly Twitter poll. He stated that only 42 percent of those who voted this week thought Talladega was a good race.

Fewer than 50 percent of the voters said either Talladega race this year was a good one in Gluck’s poll. The April race had 24 lead changes — the fewest for that event since 19 lead changes in the 1998 race — and saw a 57.8 percent decline in green-flag passes.

There’s an expectation when NASCAR races at Daytona and Talladega of pack racing, passing and wild action.

Such was in limited supply at both Talladega races this year. But it wasn’t just there. The four plate races (Daytona and Talladega) saw 89 lead changes this season — down 29.4 percent from last year’s plate races.

While three of the four plate races this year ended with a last-lap pass (Austin Dillon in the Daytona 500, Erik Jones at Daytona in July and Aric Almirola at Talladega last weekend), not everyone may be willing to wait through the racing to those final laps.

With the 2019 rules package, NASCAR anticipates pack racing to remain key at Daytona and Talladega but Sunday’s race might force series officials to make some additional changes to ensure the pack is back next year.


Questions have been raised about how NASCAR officiated the end of the Truck and Cup races this weekend at Talladega.

Kurt Busch was critical of NASCAR’s decision. Had NASCAR called a caution for the crash in Turn 1 on the last lap, Busch likely would have won. Instead, he ran out of fuel and Aric Almirola won.

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR’s chief racing development officer, explained Monday on SirusXM NASCAR Radio how series officials made the call on if to throw the caution in either race.

“Our first job is to always make sure everybody is safe, and we felt we did that in this case,” O’Donnell said about letting the Cup race finish under green.

While each last-lap scenario presents different challenges, NASCAR must remain steadfast in following what O’Donnell said in terms of driver safety. That must be No. 1 regardless of it is the last lap at Talladega, the last lap of the Daytona 500 or the last lap of the championship race in Miami.

NASCAR must be consistent with that. And that may mean calling for a caution instead of a dramatic race to the finish line.


It won’t be next year but maybe someday GMS Racing likely will field a Cup team.

GMS Racing, owned by Maury Gallagher, was in talks with Furniture Row Racing earlier this year to purchase the team’s charter, align with Joe Gibbs Racing and move to Cup next season. It’s one of the reasons why the team, through Mike Beam, didn’t try to top Front Row Motorsports’ bid for BK Racing’s charter and equipment in a court-appointed auction in August.

After examining all the costs, Gallagher decided not to pursue the Furniture Row Racing charter and equipment.

“We’re still talking and thinking about it, but first things first, we’re trying to get through this year and do some good things, particularly winning the (Truck) championship,” Gallagher said after Timothy Peters won the Truck race at Talladega.

Spencer Gallagher called the deal not working out a “tempered disappointment” but added “we got into that deal and we realized that we were going to have to undertake some additional complications with it. More than anything, if and when we make the decision to go Cup racing, I’d like to think that if we have one true luxury it is that we get to choose when and where we get to do it, which means that we’re committed to only doing it if it can be done right.

“As Maury likes to say, there’s always another deal that comes along. Patience is our watchword for getting ourselves into Cup.”

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Spencer Gallagher reflects on return to racing after ‘long, hard ordeal’ of suspension

Photo: Daniel McFadin
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Spencer Gallagher was all smiles Tuesday at the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

The 28-year-old was unveiling his throwback paint scheme for the Sept. 1 Xfinity race at Darlington Raceway, a tribute to Davey Allison’s 1985 ARCA car, or as Gallagher calls it, “The Beautiful One.”

He did so as GMS Racing also revealed Bill Elliott’s car for next weekend’s race at Road America.

After the unveilings, Gallagher playfully approached a group of kids in attendance with a sharpie in hand. Pictures and autographs ensued.

On Aug. 14, 2018, life was good for Gallagher. He had something to smile about.

That wasn’t the case on May 2.

Three days after he earned his first career NASCAR win in the Xfinity race at Talladega, Gallagher received a phone call.

He was told he had failed a drug test and violated NASCAR’s substance abuse policy. He was given an indefinite suspension.

“I’m pretty sure they had to get an excavator because my heart dropping through the building left a crater,” Gallagher told reporters Tuesday.

Three months later, and more than one month after his reinstatement upon completion of NASCAR’s Road to recovery program, Gallagher won’t say what he tested positive for and when he took his drug test.

But he did talk about what he learned from the experience, which saw drivers Johnny Sauter, Chase Elliott, Alex Bowman, Justin Haley, Casey Roderick, AJ Allmendinger and now Hall of Famer Bill Elliott take his place in the No. 23 Chevrolet.

“I like to think I’ve grown up a lot in that time. Not that I didn’t before,” Gallagher said. “I spent time at GMS like it was my life because it is my life. I’m here and dedicated to making this race team everything I possibly can. With guys like (President) Mike Beam on it, I’m very confident in what we’re going to be able to accomplish.”

Gallagher, the son of team owner Maury Gallagher, has made two Xfinity starts since his reinstatement, on July 13 at Kentucky and last weekend at Mid-Ohio, where he finished eighth.

Gallagher views his wading back into competition as a benefit to how he views his race team.

“You always enjoy being in the seat week in, week out,” Gallagher said. “But it’s been really nice getting back into the garage, being with the team. I just get to sit on the box and play owner for a couple of races, I look at it, observe from the outside what’s going on, where we need to improve, where we can improve and how well we’re doing. That’s a role you don’t often get to take on as a driver.

“You have such blinders on trying to get the car to go faster and faster, you don’t get the time to stop and look around and see what’s happening … I relish the opportunity for that and look forward to being back in the seat full-time. But I’m definitely taking advantage of the times that I can when we got another talent behind the seat.”

That talent includes the Cup Series’ latest first-time winner and 2014 Xfinity champion Chase Elliott and a road course expert in Allmendinger.

Elliott will be back in the car this weekend at Bristol Motor Speedway.

“I get a couple of amazing drivers to have as sounding boards,” Gallagher said. “You can’t help but learn, you can’t help but develop and grow and get better as a driver. That’s something honestly that I really like seeing, is getting that Cup level talent because it’s good for you as a driver. You get to learn how to improve yourself and your race craft, but it’s also great for the team. They get an outside pair of eyes that knows exactly what they’re doing that does this at the highest level you can and they get to evaluate yourself and tell you what they think is going on. I’m not a selfish guy, I’ve always been one for second opinions. Anytime we were out testing I always welcomed people to jump in my car and tell me what they think. The first thing I know is I know nothing. I always welcome another pair of eyes.”

Gallagher called his return to competition at Kentucky “the end of a long, hard ordeal.”

“Getting back out there and dropping it in fourth (gear) and holding it wide open, that felt really good,” said Gallagher, who started 15th and finished 20th. “That’s kind of one of those things that (shows) your life is back together and back on-track.”

Gallagher has received one other chance at significant track time since his reinstatement.

He made his Cup debut in the Aug. 5 race at Watkins Glen, driving the No. 23 owned by BK Racing, a team whose assets GMS Racing’s Beam is trying to bid on.

Gallagher qualified 34th and finished 35th, 17 laps down after mechanical problems, a result of running through grass.

“Teething issues, that happens,” Gallagher said. “As it turns out, engines don’t like it when you have to run them at 310 degrees because they’re full of grass.”

Would he be ready to go run full-time in Cup should GMS Racing’s Beam be successful in its pursuit of BK Racing’s assets?

“Something I’ve learned through my progression in this business is I’ve effectively been thrown in the deep end of every series that I’ve ever participated in just because I started out late in this game,” said Gallagher, who made his first laps on an oval at 19. “My entire career has been one long chain of ‘Sink or swim, kid.’ I haven’t sunk yet.

“I know it’s going to be a challenge if that’s what it comes to. We’re not just jumping in the deep end of the Cup Series, you’re jumping in the ocean. Let us remind ourselves these are some of the best drivers on planet earth, period. And that’s what you have to run against every Sunday. If I get the call, I’ve kind of inoculated myself against that fear of the unknown.”

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