Luke Lambert

Bump and Run: What should be done with the Clash?

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What should be done to the Busch Clash: Eliminate it, change the format or keep it the same?

Nate Ryan: A new format is needed because (as Kurt Busch wisely noted) when an exhibition race billed as no-holds-barred devolves into an exercise of analytics and strategy, something is amiss. Either shorten it to a trophy dash-style distance as it originally was intended. Or turn it into a series of heat races, or better yet the first in a series of heat races over several days to eliminate the unnecessary down time and re-emphasize the qualifying races in Speedweeks.

Dustin Long: If there’s still a value in the event — and I have some questions about that — then the race should be at least 35-40 laps. It’s still short but it’s long enough that handling can play a role in the race. If you don’t want handling to be a factor than go shorter.

Daniel McFadin: Simple: make it shorter. 75 laps is too long and in no way does the event feel like an intense shootout. Monday morning on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio, Chase Elliott‘s crew chief, Alan Gustafson, explained why for much of the race the Chevrolet teams were in their own group lagging behind the Ford and Toyotas. He said there was no reason to race then. Turn up the heat by turning down the lap total. And as Kurt Busch suggested, throw in cash rewards at certain lap intervals (which was done in the early days of the Busch Clash). 

Jerry Bonkowski: After 41 years, I think the Clash has run its course. As we saw Sunday, it almost always and needlessly destroys a number of good cars and doesn’t really serve a true purpose in that the winner – or anyone else in the race – gets little more than a trophy and cash for winning. They receive no points, no automatic berth in the Daytona 500 or anything else. What I would like to see is the Clash be eliminated and see the Duels take more prominence.

Name a driver who failed to make the Cup playoffs last year that you think will make the playoffs this year and why.

Nate Ryan: Jimmie Johnson. Even if he doesn’t win, crew chief Cliff Daniels already has safeguarded the No. 48 against missing on points, and it just won’t seem right if the seven-time champion doesn’t have at least a shot at going out with an eighth title.

Dustin Long: I’m intrigued with the combination of Chris Buescher and Luke Lambert at Roush Fenway Racing. The organization needs to take a step forward but these two can help lead that charge.

Daniel McFadin: I’m going with Jimmie Johnson. He and Cliff Daniels showed enough progress late last year that I believe they’ll have no problem making the playoffs in Johnson’s final full-time season.

Jerry Bonkowski: Jimmie Johnson will make the playoffs in his last season as a full-time Cup driver. After missing the playoffs last season, my sense is that Johnson, his team and all of Hendrick Motorsports will do everything they can to get the No. 48 into this year’s playoffs.

What do you think is the biggest change entering this season?

Nate Ryan: The schedule. The first warning will come next week as teams head directly to the West Coast instead of getting their usual breather of a short hop to Atlanta. Homestead-Miami Speedway will be another significant signpost next month, and the need for acclimation will continue to ratchet up (Indianapolis in July; two consecutive weeks off in midsummer) until the final 11 weeks, which will force completely new approaches with a new regular-season finale, two fresh cutoff races and a first-time championship at Phoenix.

Dustin Long: The schedule. For all the reasons listed by others here.

Daniel McFadin: The playoff schedule. It’s teed up by the regular season finale at Daytona and then we get a playoff run that includes: Darlington, Richmond, a little track called Bristol, the Roval, Talladega, a penultimate race at Martinsville and then the finale at Phoenix. If not for the third round featuring consecutive races on 1.5-mile tracks, I’d say that’s the best playoff lineup you could ask for.

Jerry Bonkowski: Not having one series entitlement sponsor for the first time since Winston came into the sport in 1971, followed by Nextel, Sprint and Monster Energy between 2004 and last season is the biggest change in my mind. Instead, there will be four sponsors who will share segments of this year’s season, while the overall series will be simply called the NASCAR Cup Series.

 

Who is your favorite for Cup Rookie of the Year?

Nate Ryan: He won’t be regarded as the favorite, but Tyler Reddick would be my pick.

Dustin Long: Christopher Bell to win a close battle.

Daniel McFadin: My gut tells me Cole Custer. I have more confidence in Custer competing for an organization like Stewart-Haas Racing right now than Tyler Reddick at Richard Childress Racing or Christopher Bell at Leavine Family Racing, a satellite of Joe Gibbs Racing. SHR’s Cup operation is just stronger right now than the other two.

Jerry Bonkowski: This is a tough one. All three of the top rookies – Tyler Reddick, Cole Custer and Christopher Bell – are worthy candidates. Reddick won six Xfinity races last season for Richard Childress Racing, but stepping up to the Cup Series is another story: RCR went winless in Cup last season, won just one race in 2018 and has only three total Cup wins since 2014. Reddick – and RCR – will have to take their game up several notches if Reddick is to win Rookie of the Year honors.

Friday 5: Key storylines entering Daytona Speedweeks

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Eighty-three days after Kyle Busch celebrated his second Cup championship, the garage opens today at Daytona International Speedway.

And with it will be the sense of renewal and unbridled optimism that often pervades during the offseason and Daytona Speedweeks.

Such feelings are evident in drivers who think this is their year to win the Daytona 500 and with smaller teams that count on the race’s big payday to help fund their operations for the coming weeks. Hope also will be strong with those among the many driver and crew chief changes made since last year.

With all the good feelings entering Daytona Speedweeks, here are five storylines to watch:

1. When will Kyle Busch’s Daytona 500 drought end?

While Kyle Busch has won a summer Cup race at Daytona, three qualifying races, a Busch Clash, a summer Xfinity race, a Truck race, and an ARCA race, he’s never won the Daytona 500 in 14 previous attempts.

The closest Busch has come to winning the season-opening race was last year when he placed second to Denny Hamlin as part of a 1-2-3 finish for Joe Gibbs Racing that included Erik Jones finishing third.

David Pearson celebrates winning the 1976 Daytona 500 after a last-lap crash with Richard Petty.(Photo by ISC Archives/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images)

If it is any solace for Busch and his fans, Hall of Famer David Pearson didn’t win his lone Daytona 500 until his 15th attempt.

Others who needed more years before winning their first Daytona 500 were: Kurt Busch (in his 16th start), Darrell Waltrip (17th start), Buddy Baker (18th start) and Dale Earnhardt (20th start).

Of course, some Hall of Fame drivers never won a Daytona 500. Mark Martin failed to win the race in 29 starts. Rusty Wallace didn’t win in 23 starts. Tony Stewart, inducted into the Hall of Fame last weekend in a class that included Baker, did not win the Daytona 500 in 17 starts.

With Toyota the presumptive favorite again this season — based on few rule changes and Toyota’s 19 wins in 36 points races last year — will this be the year that Busch wins the Daytona 500?

2. Putting the puzzle together

Car owner Roger Penske shocked many by jumbling his driver/crew chief lineup after his organization won six races and placed all three drivers in the top eight in points.

But as Brad Keselowski recently said: “We want to be great. We want to win championships. You’ve got to recognize that winning races is still a significant accomplishment in this sport. It’s great competition week in and week out, so winning is good but also emphasize that greatness is the championship. We didn’t win it. It means we’ve got work to do.”

Todd Gordon (left) will serve as Ryan Blaney‘s crew chief this season. (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

Daytona marks the debut of the new combinations. Keselowski is paired with crew chief Jeremy Bullins. Joey Logano is teamed with crew chief Paul Wolfe, who led Keselowski to a championship in 2012. Ryan Blaney is working with Todd Gordon, who guided Logano to the Cup title in 2018.

Other new pairings to watch include Martin Truex Jr. and James Small, who takes over with Cole Pearn leaving the sport, and Chris Buescher and Luke Lambert, who both come to Roush Fenway Racing from other teams.

Crew chief strategy often is limited at Daytona because of the need for cars within the same manufacturer to work together (i.e. pit at the same time), but Speedweeks can be valuable for new driver/crew chief pairings with communication. After Daytona, Cup teams race seven consecutive weekends before the Easter break in April. If the communication falters, the results may not be as good.

3. Will the chaos continue?

Last year’s Daytona 500 saw 36 of the 40 cars involved in a crash, according to NASCAR’s race report (Racing Insights, which supplies statistics to NBC Sports, had 37 cars involved in accidents).

“It’s incredible to me how many times we were able to crash in the last 10 laps,” Jamie McMurray said after last year’s race, his final Cup start.

“Brains come unglued,” Kyle Busch said after last year’s race. “That’s all it is.”

Just a portion of the chaos in last year’s Daytona 500. (Photo by Brian Lawdermilk/Getty Images)

There were three cautions, including two red flags totaling nearly 40 minutes, in the last 17 laps. Those incidents collected 29 cars and forced the race to go seven laps beyond the scheduled distance.

Such destruction has become a trend. The past three Daytona 500s have seen an average of 32 cars involved in accidents. 

Last year’s Daytona Speedweeks was especially tough on Cup car owners. A total of 60 cars were involved in accidents in practices, qualifying races, the Busch Clash and the Daytona 500. That was an increase of 16.7% from the previous Daytona Speedweeks.

As another Speedweeks begins, key questions are how many cars will be damaged, how will that impact teams and who can emerge from the chaos to win?

4. Who steps up in this pivotal contract year?

Kyle Larson, Ryan Blaney and Brad Keselowski are among the drivers in the final year of their contract this season.

Who will drive this car in 2021? (Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images)

What better way to have some leverage at the bargaining table then to be the reigning Daytona 500 champ?

Silly season could be frenzied with several drivers, including Erik Jones, Alex Bowman and Clint Bowyer, among those in the last year of their contracts. A strong start could build momentum over the next several weeks and help drivers remain in their current spot or find a tantalizing ride elsewhere.

One thing is for certain, the No. 48 is open next year with Jimmie Johnson set to step away from full-time Cup racing after this season. 

5. Hailie Deegan’s Daytona debut

The 18-year-old makes her debut on Daytona International Speedway’s oval with today’s ARCA practice sessions. Of course, she was on track a couple of weeks ago in the IMSA Michelin Pilot Challenge race.

Hailie Deegan will compete in her first race on Daytona’s oval this weekend. (Photo by David Rosenblum/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Deegan left Toyota’s development program for Ford in the offseason and will drive full-time in the ARCA Series for DGR-Crosley. She won three races in what was called K&N Pro Series West over the past two years.

Deegan’s move to ARCA will be watched closely at Daytona and throughout the season. She has the best funding and resources among any female drivers in NASCAR.

Some may view her as the next Danica Patrick but Deegan and her family are wanting to take a more measured approach to moving up the NASCAR ladder.

Deegan understands what’s at stake. She said last month during sports car testing at Daytona that “this is the year that’s very important and crucial to my career because it decides contracts for years out with sponsors getting behind you for the higher levels.”

It all starts this weekend for her.

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What’s different in the NASCAR Cup Series in 2020

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The fog of the offseason has begun to lift and the start of a new NASCAR season looms.

When the fog clears, we will be met with the 62nd Daytona 500 on Feb. 16.

But this won’t be the start of just another season in NASCAR’s premier series. It will have a very different landscape compared to when the 2019 season ended in Miami in November.

While there’s a lot to breakdown for the coming season, it’s all essentially a preamble for 2021, which will see the Cup Series with its Next Gen car and potentially a very different race schedule.

Here’s what the table looks like for the Cup Series heading into 2020.

New Era, New Names

After serving in the role for three years, Monster Energy is no longer the entitlement sponsor of the Cup Series. With its departure also comes the end of the Cup Series’ entitlement sponsor model that had been in place since 1971 beginning with Winston.

After five decades of being the Winston, Nextel, Sprint and finally the Monster Energy Cup Series, the premier series will simply be called the NASCAR Cup Series.

2020 marks the start of NASCAR’s premier partner program, which includes Xfinity, Coca-Cola, Geico and Busch Beer.

Farther down on the series ladder comes the official merger of the ARCA Menards Series with NASCAR and what had been its K&N Pro Series circuits. The regional series will now be called the ARCA Menards Series East and West.

A glimpse at what Martinsville Speedway will look like at night. (Photo by Sarah Crabill/Getty Images)

Shuffling the Schedule

There’s a lot of expectations for what the Cup Series schedule will look like in 2021 after the end of NASCAR’s current five-year agreement with tracks.

But 2020 also has plenty of groundbreaking schedule developments.

– Martinsville Speedway will host its first official Cup night race on May 9. The short track also will host the final playoff elimination race for all three national series, with the Cup race held Nov. 1.

– Pocono Raceway will be the site of the Cup Series’ first ever doubleheader weekend June 27-28. Saturday’s race will be preceded by a Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series event and Sunday begins with a Xfinity Series race.

– Daytona International Speedway will host the Cup regular season finale, moving its second date from the traditional July 4 weekend to Aug. 29. The July 4 weekend race is now held by Indianapolis Motor Speedway (Cup races there July 5).

– Darlington Raceway and the Southern 500 will open the Cup playoffs on Sept. 6. It’s joined in the opening round by Richmond Raceway and in the playoffs for the first time, Bristol Motor Speedway, which will be the first elimination race.

– After being the site of the first elimination race the last two seasons, the Charlotte Roval will be the Round of 12 elimination race (Oct. 11) and be preceded by Talladega Superspeedway.

–  After a nearly two-decade run, Homestead-Miami Speedway is no longer the site of the championship weekend. Its place is now held by Phoenix Raceway, with the Cup championship race scheduled for Nov. 8. Miami’s Cup race will be March 22.

– Other notable changes: The Xfinity Series will compete at Martinsville (Oct. 31) for the first time since 2004. The Truck Series returns to Richmond Raceway (April 18) for the first time since 2005.

Chevrolet

Chevrolet Remodel

Chevrolet Cup teams will appear in Daytona with a slightly different look to their cars.

Chevy will field its Camaro ZL1 1LE model in 2020, replacing the basic ZL1 model. One reason for the change is difficulties with the latter’s pointed nose when it came to pushing other cars at Daytona and Talladega compared to Ford and Toyota and their flatter noses.

Familiar Names, Different Teams

When the full Cup Series starting grid forms for the first time at the Daytona 500, there will be a lot familiar faces sporting new numbers with new teams. That includes a rather accomplished rookie class.

Matt DiBenedetto debuts with Wood Brothers Racing in the No. 21 Ford, moving over from Leavine Family Racing and taking over for Paul Menard, who retired from full-time racing.

–  After a decade with Roush Fenway Racing, Ricky Stenhouse Jr. begins the 2020s with his first season at JTG Daugherty Racing driving the No. 47 Chevrolet. Teammate Ryan Preece will drive the No. 37. Stenhouse will have Brian Pattie as his crew chief. Preece will work with Trent Owens.

Chris Buescher left JTG Daugherty Racing to return to Roush and race the No. 17 Ford, which was vacated by Stenhouse. Buescher will be paired with crew chief Luke Lambert.

Christopher Bell moves up from the Xfinity Series to drive Leavine Family Racing’s No. 95 Toyota along with crew chief Jason Ratcliff. Harrison Burton replaces Bell in Joe Gibbs Racing’s No. 20 Xfinity car. 

Tyler Reddick was promoted by Richard Childress Racing to drive its No. 8 Cup car after winning the last two Xfinity Series titles. He moves up with crew chief Randall Burnett. Reddick replaces Daniel Hemric, who will drive a part-time Xfinity schedule for JR Motorsports.

Cole Custer and Mike Shiplett after their first win together in 2019. (Photo by Donald Page/Getty Images)

– Cole Custer and crew chief Mike Shiplett were promoted by Stewart-Haas Racing to take over its No. 41 Cup car, taking the place of Daniel Suarez. Suarez has not announced his plans for this season. SHR has not announced plans for its Xfinity program in 2020.

SHR also paired crew chief Mike Bugarewicz with Aric Almirola on the No. 10 and John Klausmeier with Clint Bowyer on the No. 14.

– Rookie John Hunter Nemechek takes over Front Row Motorsports’ No. 38 Ford, which was driven by the now retired David Ragan. Nemechek is paired with Seth Barbour at crew chief.

– Rookie Brennan Poole will drive for Premium Motorsports full-time in the No. 15 car. 

– After making 17 Cup starts in 2019, Quin Houff will race full-time in StarCom Racing’s No. 00 Chevrolet.

Joey Gase and J.J. Yeley will race full-time for Rick Ware Racing.

Martin Truex Jr. will have a new crew chief after the surprise resignation of Cole Pearn. The No. 19 team will be led by James Small.

Team Penske shook up its crew chief lineup for this year. Paul Wolfe will now work with Joey Logano, Jeremy Bullins is paired with Brad Keselowski and Todd Gordon is paired with Ryan Blaney.

Bubba Wallace also has a new crew chief. The Richard Petty Motorsports driver is reunited with Jerry Baxter, who he worked with in the Truck Series.

– Ryan Sparks joins Go Fas Racing after 13 years with Richard Childress Racing, primarily as an engineer, and will serve as crew chief for Corey LaJoie in the No. 32, replacing Randy Cox.

A Post-Jimmie Johnson World

Jimmie Johnson announced soon after the 2019 season finale that 2020 would be his final full-time Cup season.

That means the storyline of who will replace him in the No. 48 will simmer underneath the surface for much of the season. Who could succeed the seven-time champion?

Kyle Larson is entering the final season of his contract with Chip Ganassi Racing.

Erik Jones is racing on a one-year extension with Joe Gibbs Racing

Matt DiBenedetto is under a one-year deal with the Wood Brothers.

More possible candidates could include Ryan Blaney, Brad Keselowski and others.

Building for the Future

Ford provided one of the biggest storylines of the offseason when it announced that Hailie Deegan was joining the manufacturer as a development driver after a few years spent in the Toyota pipeline.

Deegan will compete full-time in ARCA Menards Series with DGR-Crosley.

Penalty report from Texas Motor Speedway

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NASCAR has issued $10,000 fines to three Cup Series crew chiefs for having one unsecured lug nut on their cars after Sunday’s playoff race at Texas Motor Speedway.

The crew chief include: Chris Gabehart, crew chief on Denny Hamlin‘s No. 11 Toyota; Mark Hillman, crew chief on Parker Kligerman‘s No. 96 Toyota; and Luke Lambert, crew chief on Daniel Hemric‘s No. 8 Chevrolet.

NASCAR also issued an indefinite suspension to Michael Barraclough for violating its substance abuse policy.

There were no other penalties.

 

Crew chiefs for Chris Buescher, Tyler Reddick named for 2020 Cup season

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Luke Lambert has been tapped by Roush Fenway Racing to serve as crew chief for Chris Buescher and his No. 17 Ford in 2020, the team announced Tuesday.

Lambert will join the team after working with Daniel Hemric on Richard Childress Racing’s No. 8 Chevrolet this season.

“We are certainly excited to have Luke Lambert joining our organization and taking over the reins of the No. 17 program,” team owner Jack Roush said in a press release. “Luke has a strong engineering background and also the ability to energize and lead a team. We look forward to pairing him with Chris next season and seeing what they can do on the track.”

With two races left in the season, Lambert and rookie Hemric have two top 10s, including a fifth-place finish at Talladega.

Lambert has 258 races as a Cup crew chief since 2011 with one win in 2017 with Ryan Newman.

He also served as Elliott Sadler‘s crew chief in the Xfinity Series in 2012 where they won four races together.

Taking over for Lambert on RCR’s No. 8 Chevy next year will be Randall Burnett, who will be paired with Tyler Reddick. They work together in the Xfinity Series.

Reddick and Burnett have five wins together this season. Reddick is third in the standings ahead of Saturday’s Xfinity elimination race at ISM Raceway (3:30 p.m. ET on NBC).

Burnett has been with RCR since 2017.