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Busch brothers put on a show: Kyle wins Bristol, Kurt finishes second

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It was the Busch brothers show Sunday at Bristol Motor Speedway as younger brother Kyle won the Food City 500, while older sibling Kurt finished second.

It was Kyle Busch’s eighth career Cup win at the .533-mile short track, depriving Kurt of his seventh win there. The younger Busch also recorded a series-leading third win in the first eight races of 2019, as well as capturing the 54th win of his Cup career, tying him for 10th on the NASCAR all-time wins list with Hall of Famer Lee Petty.

It looked like it might not be Kyle Busch’s day after being rear-ended by Ricky Stenhouse Jr. on Lap 2. But Busch was able to work his way through the field. The biggest key came during the race’s final caution when Busch stayed out with 20 laps to go and held on to take the checkered flag.

Kyle Busch wins the Food City 500 at Bristol. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

“We’re crazy, we just do what we do to try to win,” Busch told Fox Sports 1. “It’s awesome that we were able to snooker those guys to be able to get our win. I love this place. It was fun to battle my brother there at the end. We didn’t quite get side-by-side racing, but I saw him working the top and I’m like, ‘I better go’ and I was able to make up some ground.

This is the second time the brothers have finished 1-2 in a Cup race (the other time was at Sonoma in 2015).

What’s more, the Busch brothers have combined to win the last four races at BMS, dating back to August 2017.

“That one’s tough, I really wanted to beat (Kyle), I was going to wreck him,” Kurt Busch laughed to FS1. “I was wanting to stay close enough so that when we took the white, I was just going to drive into him in (Turns) 3 and 4. He already won (twice this season) and figured he could give a little love to his brother. Nah.”

It was Kurt Busch’s best finish of the season.

Joey Logano finished third, followed by Ryan Blaney and Denny Hamlin.

MORE: Race Results

STAGE 1 WINNER: Ty Dillon (first stage victory of his Cup career).

STAGE 2 WINNER: Joey Logano.

WHO ELSE HAD A GOOD RACE: Jimmie Johnson finished 10th, earning his second consecutive top-10 finish. … Paul Menard and Ryan Newman both earned their respective first top-10 finishes of the season. … Daniel Suarez earned his third straight top 10 and fourth of the season. … Ryan Blaney led a race-high 158 laps.

WHO HAD A BAD RACE: Things got off to a rough start with a Lap 2 wreck that included Kyle Busch, Aric Almirola (who was knocked out of the race after the impact), Ryan Preece and Ricky Stenhouse Jr.

NOTABLE: Kevin Harvick had a rough start to the day but rallied late to finish 13th. Before the race, his engineer was ejected fafter Harvick’s car failed to pass pre-race inspection three times. Harvick had to start from the back of the field and do a pass through penalty at the start. Then Harvick had to make an unscheduled pit stop due to a loose wheel .

WHAT’S NEXT: Toyota Owners 400 this Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. ET at Richmond Raceway.

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NASCAR Hall of Famer Glen Wood dies at 93

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Wood Brothers Racing patriarch Glen Wood, who was inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2012, died Friday. He was 93.

The team announced his passing Friday morning on social media.

Wood was a link to NASCAR’s early years.

A former driver – he won four times at Bowman Gray Stadium in Winston-Salem, N.C. – Glen Wood founded the Wood Brothers Racing team with brothers Leonard and Delano. In Wood’s first win at Bowman Gray Stadium in April 1960, he beat a field that included former champions Richard Petty, Rex White, Ned Jarrett and Lee Petty. Wood’s history also includes seeing Tim Flock race with a monkey and having Ralph Earnhardt drive convertible and sportsman cars for the team.

His racing career nearly ended as soon as it started. Wood and a friend paid $50 for a 1938 Ford coupe to go racing. The Stuart, Virginia, native ran his first race at a track near Martinsville. During the heat race, his car was hit and bent the rear-end housing. After the race, Wood and his friend hooked the race car to the vehicle they were driving and headed home.

But on the trip, the axle eventually broke, and the damage caused spilling fuel to ignite. The fire engulfed the back of the race car.

“Every once in a while one of them (gas cans) would blow up, and we would be afraid to get close to it because of that,” Wood recalled in a 2011 interview. “Finally we got it unhooked and got the car away from (the one pulling it) and let it burn because we couldn’t do anything about it.”

They salvaged the engine and repaired the car. A few weeks later, Wood was back racing.

While Leonard is often credited as the father of the modern pit stop, Glen was equally as responsible. The two developed a communication and strategy plan that was one of the best in NASCAR for several decades.

Wood Brothers Racing, which has 99 Cup victories, remains the oldest continuous racing team in NASCAR. Among the drivers that have raced for the team are Hall of Famers David Pearson, Curtis Turner, Junior Johnson, Joe Weatherly, Fred Lorenzen, Cale Yarborough, Dale Jarrett and Bill Elliott.

Born on July 18, 1925, Glen retired as a driver at the age of 39, assuming full-time duties as the team’s chief administrator, a role that he handled for nearly 30 years before relegating the role to sons Eddie and Len.

Through the years, Wood’s name mysteriously changed. His birth certificate lists his first name as Glenn, but somewhere along the way the last letter was dropped.

Wood received the colorful nickname of “Wood Chopper” early on for how he used to cut timber at a Virginia sawmill. But when Glen started racing, that nickname followed him and became somewhat of a calling card for his winning ways.

“When he pulled into a racetrack, and the announcer would say, ‘Here comes the Wood Chopper from Stuart, Virginia,’ you knew you had a challenger that night,” Ned Jarrett, a fellow NASCAR Hall of Famer, said of Glen Wood in a 2012 NASCAR Hall video of Glen Wood’s career. “Glen Wood, he was the master.”

Kyle Petty, who drove for the Wood Brothers during his career, was a Hall of Fame voter when the group discussed who to induct in the 2012 class. Behind the closed doors, Petty made an impassioned speech for the voters to select Wood for induction.

“I think people forget the breadth of somebody’s career sometimes when it spans as long as his,” Kyle Petty said that day in 2011.

In a statement, Edsel B. Ford II, member of the Board of Directors for Ford Motor Company, said of Wood’s passing:

“This is a difficult day for all of us at Ford Motor Company. Glen Wood was the founding patriarch of the oldest continuously operating NASCAR Cup Series team and we consider Wood Brothers Racing a part of our family, the Ford Family. The Wood Brothers race team, by any measure, has been one of the most successful racing operations in the history of NASCAR. Most importantly for our company, Glen and his family have remained loyal to Ford throughout their 69-year history.

“Glen was an innovator who, along with his family, changed the sport itself.  But, more importantly, he was a true Southern gentleman who was quick with a smile and a handshake and he was a man of his word.   I will cherish the memories of our chats in the NASCAR garage, at their race shop in Mooresville or the racing museum in Stuart.  My most memorable moment with Glen was with he and his family in the #21 pit box watching Trevor Bayne win the 2011 Daytona 500 and the celebration that followed in victory lane.”

In a statement, NASCAR’s Jim France said: “In every way, Glen Wood was an original. In building the famed Wood Brothers Racing at the very beginnings of our sport, Glen laid a foundation for NASCAR excellence that remains to this day. As both a driver and a team owner, he was, and always will be, the gold standard. But personally, even more significant than his exemplary on-track record, he was a true gentleman and a close confidant to my father, mother and brother. On behalf of the France family and all of NASCAR, I send my condolences to the entire Wood family for the loss of a NASCAR giant.”

In a statement, Indianapolis Motor Speedway President J. Douglas Boles said: “Everyone at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway is saddened by the passing of Glen Wood. The word ‘legendary’ sometimes is overused, but it absolutely fits Glen and the team that he and his brother, Leonard, founded and built into a powerhouse in NASCAR. Wood Brothers Racing has such a deep, rich connection to IMS through its multiple entries in the Brickyard 400 and by serving as the pit crew for the Lotus/Ford that Jim Clark drove to victory in the 1965 Indianapolis 500. Glen’s legacy as a fine driver and motorsports innovator will be matched only by his enduring status as one of racing’s true gentlemen and class acts.”

Jerry Bonkowski contributed to this report

Police investigating vandalism, theft at North Wilkesboro Speedway

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The Wilkes County Sheriff’s Office is investigating a report of vandalism and theft at North Wilkesboro Speedway.

According to the Sheriff’s Office, the track, which last hosted a NASCAR Cup race in 1996, suffered damage of about $10,000 when several trespassers were on the grounds last weekend. No arrests have been made.

The report states that several windows were broken and other damage was done to the structures. Also, large amounts of electrical wire and circuit breakers were reported missing.

The investigation continues.

North Wilkesboro Speedway hosted NASCAR Cup races from 1949-96. Winners included Fireball Roberts, Buck Baker, Junior Johnson, Lee Petty, Richard Petty, David Pearson, Cale Yarborough, Darrell Waltrip, Bobby Allison, Dale Earnhardt, Terry Labonte, Rusty Wallace and Jeff Gordon, who won the final race there.

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Friday 5: Questions about size of future Hall of Fame classes

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After NASCAR celebrates the ninth Hall of Fame class tonight (8 p.m. ET on NBCSN), questions may soon arise about how many inductees should be honored annually.

NASCAR inducts five people each year. When NASCAR announced eligibility changes in 2013, a former series executive said that the sanctioning body would “give strong consideration” to if five people should be inducted each year and if there should be a veteran’s committee “after the 10th class is seated.’’

The 10th class — which Jeff Gordon will be eligible for and expected to headline— will be selected later this year and honored in 2019. That gives NASCAR a year to determine what changes to make if officials follow the schedule mentioned in 2013. NASCAR has discussed different scenarios as part of its examination of the Hall of Fame.

Among the questions NASCAR could face is should no more than three people be inducted a year? Should only nominees who receive a specific percentage of the vote be inducted? Should other methods be considered in determining who enters the Hall? 

Only one of the last five classes had all five inductees selected on at least 50 percent of the ballots. Five people in the last three classes each received less than 50 percent of the vote.

The challenge is that if NASCAR reduced the number of people inducted after the Class of 2019, it could create a logjam in the coming years.

Tony Stewart and Carl Edwards (provided Edwards does not return to run a significant number of races) would be eligible for the Class of 2020.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Matt Kenseth (provided Kenseth does not return to run a significant number of races) would be eligible for the Class of 2021.

Stewart would appear to be a lock for his year and it seems likely Earnhardt would make it as well his first year.

If the Hall of Fame classes were cut to three a year, and Stewart, Earnhardt and Kenseth each were selected in those two years, that would leave three spots during that time for others.

The nominees for this year’s class included former champions Bobby Labonte and Alan Kulwicki, crew chief Harry Hyde (56 wins, 88 poles) and Waddell Wilson (22 wins, 32 poles), car owners Roger Penske, Jack Roush and Joe Gibbs and Cup drivers Buddy Baker, Davey Allison and Ricky Rudd.

A 2019 Class that might feature Jeff Gordon, Harry Hyde, Buddy Baker and two others would still leave some worthy candidates who might not make it for a couple of years if the number of inductees is reduced.

Of course, there are those who haven’t been nominated that some would suggest should be, including Smokey Yunick, Humpy Wheeler, Buddy Parrott, Kirk Shelmerdine, Neil Bonnett, Harry Gant and Tim Richmond. That could further jumble who makes it if the number of inductees is reduced.

Those are just some of the issues NASCAR could face as it examines if any changes need to be made.

2. Hall of Fame Classes and vote totals

Note: NASCAR did not release vote totals for the inaugural class (2010 with Richard Petty, Dale Earnhardt, Junior Johnson, Bill France Sr., and Bill France Jr.). Below are the other classes with the percent of ballots each inductee was on:

2018 Class

Robert Yates (94 percent)

Red Byron (74 percent)

Ray Evernham (52 percent)

Ken Squier (40 percent)

Ron Hornaday Jr. (38 percent)

2017 Class

Benny Parsons (85 percent)

Rick Hendrick (62 percent)

Mark Martin (57 percent)

Raymond Parks (53 percent)

Richard Childress (43 percent)

2016 Class

Bruton Smith (68 percent)

Terry Labonte (61 percent)

Curtis Turner (60 percent)

Jerry Cook (47 percent)

Bobby Isaac (44 percent)

2015 Class

Bill Elliott (87 percent)

Wendell Scott (58 percent)

Joe Weatherly (53 percent)

Rex White (43 percent)

Fred Lorenzen (30 percent)

2014 Class

Tim Flock (76 percent)

Maurice Petty (67 percent)

Dale Jarrett (56 percent)

Jack Ingram (53 percent)

Fireball Roberts (51 percent)

2013 Class

Herb Thomas (57 percent)

Leonard Wood (57 percent)

Rusty Wallace (52 percent)

Cotten Owens (50 percent)

Buck Baker (39 percent)

2012 Class

Cale Yarborough (85 percent)

Darrell Waltrip (82 percent)

Dale Inman (78 percent)

Richie Evans (50 percent)

Glen Wood (44 percent)

2011 Class

David Pearson (94 percent)

Bobby Allison (62 percent)

Lee Petty (62 percent)

Ned Jarrett (58 percent)

Bud Moore (45 percent)

3. Charter Switcheroo

Five charters have changed hands since last season. One will be with its third different team in the three years of the charter system.

In 2016, Premium Motorsports leased its charter to HScott Motorsports so the No. 46 team of Michael Annett could use it.

The charter was returned after that season, and Premium Motorsports sold the charter to Furniture Row Racing for the No. 77 car of Erik Jones for 2017.

With Jones moving to Joe Gibbs Racing and Furniture Row Racing not finding enough sponsorship to continue the team, the charter was sold to JTG Daugherty for the No. 37 team of Chris Buescher for this season. (The No. 37 team had leased a charter from Roush Fenway Racing last year).

So that will make the third different team the charter, which originally belonged to Premium Motorsports, has been with since the system was created.

4. Dodge and NASCAR?

Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne excited fans when he said in Dec. 2016 about Dodge that “it is possible we can come back to NASCAR.’’

One report last year stated that Dodge decided not to return to NASCAR, and another countered that report.

While questions remain on if Dodge will return to NASCAR, Marchionne announced this week at the Detroit Auto Show that he’ll step down next year, and that Fiat Chrysler will release a business plan in June that will go through 2022. The company will announce a successor to Marchionne sometime after that.

Marchionne said, according to The Associated Press, that the U.S. tax cuts passed in December are worth $1 billion annually to Fiat Chrysler.

A Wall Street Journal story this week stated that Fiat Chrysler makes most of its profit from its Jeep and Ram brands, writing that those brands “have been on a roll as U.S. buyers shift to these kinds of light trucks and away from sedans, which is a segment the company has largely abandoned.’’

5. NMPA Hall of Fame

The National Motorsports Hall of Fame will induct four people into its Hall of Fame on Sunday night. Those four will be drivers Terry Labonte and Donnie Allison and crew chiefs Jake Elder and Buddy Parrott.

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Dale Earnhardt Jr. wins Most Popular Driver Award for record 15th consecutive year

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Dale Earnhardt Jr. won his record-extending 15th consecutive – and final – NMPA Most Popular Driver Award on Thursday night.

Earnhardt was presented the award by Hall of Famer Dale Jarrett during the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Awards show at Wynn Las Vegas.

“Thanks for all you’ve done for the sport,” Jarrett told Earnhardt.

“I’ve got to thank the fans,” Earnhardt said. “Without them none of the opportunities I had in racing would have happened. It always comes back to the fans.”

WATCH: NBCSN airs Cup Series Awards Show at 9 p.m. ET. (Watch Cup Awards Show online here)

Earnhardt, who announced in April this would be his final full-time season Cup season, will miss breaking Bill Elliott’s record of 16 career Most Popular Driver Awards.

Even so, Earnhardt dedicated his final Cup season to the fans with an appreciation tour.

Completing the top 10 in this year’s voting were (listed alphabetically): Ryan Blaney, Kyle Busch, Chase Elliott, Jimmie Johnson, Kasey Kahne, Matt Kenseth, Kyle Larson, Danica Patrick and Martin Truex Jr.

In his speech, Busch joked to Earnhardt: “To Dale, thanks for the friendship that we’ve grown over the years, and of course for you converting Junior Nation into Rowdy fans. It’s all going to be very different getting all those cheers next year at driver intros.”

Also, NASCAR Chairman Brian France presented Earnhardt with the Bill France Award of Excellence, an award that is not always given.

“It’s a real honor, I always tell people all the time that all I wanted to do in racing was to pay my bills and race for a long time,” Earnhardt said of receiving the Bill France Award.

NMPA Most Popular Driver Award winners

Year    Winner

2017    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2016    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2015    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2014    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2013    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2012    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2011    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2010    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2009    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2008    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2007    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2006    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2005    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2004    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2003    Dale Earnhardt Jr.

2002    Bill Elliott

2001    Dale Earnhardt

2000    Bill Elliott

1999    Bill Elliott

1998    Bill Elliott

1997    Bill Elliott

1996    Bill Elliott

1995    Bill Elliott

1994    Bill Elliott

1993    Bill Elliott

1992    Bill Elliott

1991    Bill Elliott

1990    Darrell Waltrip

1989    Darrell Waltrip

1988    Bill Elliott

1987    Bill Elliott

1986    Bill Elliott

1985    Bill Elliott

1984    Bill Elliott

1983    Bobby Allison

1982    Bobby Allison

1981    Bobby Allison

1980    David Pearson

1979    David Pearson

1978    Richard Petty

1977    Richard Petty

1976    Richard Petty

1975    Richard Petty

1974    Richard Petty

1973    Bobby Allison

1972    Bobby Allison

1971    Bobby Allison

1970    Richard Petty

1969    Bobby Isaac

1967    Cale Yarborough

1966    Darel Dieringer

1965    Fred Lorenzen

1964    Richard Petty

1963    Fred Lorenzen

1962    Richard Petty

1961    Joe Weatherly

1960    Rex White

1959    Jack Smith

1958    Glen Wood

1957    Fireball Roberts

1956    Curtis Turner

1955    Tim Flock

1954    Lee Petty

1953    Lee Petty