Leavine Family Racing

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More NASCAR teams under stay at home order

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Cabarrus County in North Carolina became the second county that is home to NASCAR teams to issue an order for residents to stay at home because of COVID-19.

The order was issued Wednesday after two individuals in the county died of coronavirus. The order takes effect at 5 p.m. ET on Thursday. The order, which restricts non-essential travel and bans gatherings of more than 10 pepole, goes through April 16.

The order impacts those also in the cities of Kannapolis, Concord and Harrisburg. Cup race shops in those locations – and subject to the order – include Stewart-Haas Racing (Kannapolis), Chip Ganassi Racing (Concord), Roush Fenway Racing (Concord), Leavine Family Racing (Concord) and JTG Daugherty Racing (Harrisburg).

Previously, Mecklenburg County issued a stay at home order that begins at 8 a.m. ET Thursday and goes through April 16. Joe Gibbs Racing, based in Huntersville, is in that county. Hendrick Motorsports has a Charlotte address in Mecklenburg County.

Race shops in other counties are not under such orders at this time.

Here is the Cabarrus County order.

 

 

JGR puts three cars in top 10 at Auto Club but work remains

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A week after it failed to place a car higher than 15th at Las Vegas, Joe Gibbs Racing and Toyota put three cars in the top 10, with Kyle Busch leading the way with a runner-up finish in the Auto Club 400.

But that didn’t keep David Wilson, president of Toyota Racing Development, from noting that race winner Alex Bowman “schooled us.”

Bowman led 110 of 200 laps and won Stage 1 on the way to victory lane.

Meanwhile, Toyota cars led just once for a total of three laps. That was when Martin Truex Jr. – who started at the rear after failing pre-qualifying inspection three times – battled with Bowman in the middle of the final stage.

That’s after Truex led Toyota’s only lap last week at Las Vegas.

Busch only finished second after Ryan Blaney had to pit for a corded tire with three laps to go. After starting 17th, Busch placed 10th in Stage 1 and seventh in Stage 2.

His runner-up finish is his first top 10 of the season.

“We have a lot of work to do,” Busch told Fox. “Guys did a great job here though just trying to work on it and trying to make everything we could out of it all day long, all weekend long. Interstate Batteries Camry wasn’t a second-place car, but thankfully we got a good finish out of here and try to get some points. Guys are doing all they can, I know along with everybody at (Toyota Racing Development). I appreciate all the hard work, we just have to get a little bit better. We finished the end of last year so strong, I don’t know what we’re missing here. Obviously, it’s a little bit of something here and maybe a little bit of something in a few different areas, but overall good car today.”

Behind Busch were Denny Hamlin in sixth and Erik Jones in 10th.

Hamlin was running in fourth on Lap 140 when his No. 11 Toyota brushed the wall exiting Turn 2 and he dropped to seventh.

“We’re still slow,” Hamlin said. “Our cars handled okay. If we don’t have a draft, we’re just run over. It’s tough because I feel like we’re getting beat on throttle time, but we’re also just getting murdered down the straightaways. Just need more horsepower, more downforce and less drag. If we can have all those, we’ll be better.”

Jones’ top 10 is his best finish of the season after he placed 18th at Daytona and 23rd in Vegas.

He called the race “a step in the right direction.”

“I don’t think any of us really had race-winning speed,” Jones said. “I think Kyle (Busch) got some good track position on that restart and was able to maintain. We got shuffled back and kind of had to come back from 15th. I don’t know, I think we’re off. We didn’t have anything for the 88 (Alex Bowman) or anything like that.”

After making his way to the front, Truex’s status as a contender ended with a slow pit stop on Lap 160 when a tire changer’s hand cramped up. He finished 14th.

Meanwhile, the rookie campaign of Leavine Family Racing’s Christopher Bell remains stuck in neutral after three races.

After wrecking out of the Daytona 500 and placing 33rd in Vegas following a crash, Bell was the only driver who failed to finish the race Sunday. His day ended on Lap 80 when he went to the garage after a bolt from another car struck a hole in the oil cooler on his No. 95 Toyota.

Gaunt Brothers Racing and Daniel Suarez had their best outing of the season  after failing to make the Daytona 500 and suffering a mechanical issue coming to the green flag in Vegas.

Suarez had an uneventful day and placed 28th, two laps down.

Bump and Run: What should be done with the Clash?

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What should be done to the Busch Clash: Eliminate it, change the format or keep it the same?

Nate Ryan: A new format is needed because (as Kurt Busch wisely noted) when an exhibition race billed as no-holds-barred devolves into an exercise of analytics and strategy, something is amiss. Either shorten it to a trophy dash-style distance as it originally was intended. Or turn it into a series of heat races, or better yet the first in a series of heat races over several days to eliminate the unnecessary down time and re-emphasize the qualifying races in Speedweeks.

Dustin Long: If there’s still a value in the event — and I have some questions about that — then the race should be at least 35-40 laps. It’s still short but it’s long enough that handling can play a role in the race. If you don’t want handling to be a factor than go shorter.

Daniel McFadin: Simple: make it shorter. 75 laps is too long and in no way does the event feel like an intense shootout. Monday morning on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio, Chase Elliott‘s crew chief, Alan Gustafson, explained why for much of the race the Chevrolet teams were in their own group lagging behind the Ford and Toyotas. He said there was no reason to race then. Turn up the heat by turning down the lap total. And as Kurt Busch suggested, throw in cash rewards at certain lap intervals (which was done in the early days of the Busch Clash). 

Jerry Bonkowski: After 41 years, I think the Clash has run its course. As we saw Sunday, it almost always and needlessly destroys a number of good cars and doesn’t really serve a true purpose in that the winner – or anyone else in the race – gets little more than a trophy and cash for winning. They receive no points, no automatic berth in the Daytona 500 or anything else. What I would like to see is the Clash be eliminated and see the Duels take more prominence.

Name a driver who failed to make the Cup playoffs last year that you think will make the playoffs this year and why.

Nate Ryan: Jimmie Johnson. Even if he doesn’t win, crew chief Cliff Daniels already has safeguarded the No. 48 against missing on points, and it just won’t seem right if the seven-time champion doesn’t have at least a shot at going out with an eighth title.

Dustin Long: I’m intrigued with the combination of Chris Buescher and Luke Lambert at Roush Fenway Racing. The organization needs to take a step forward but these two can help lead that charge.

Daniel McFadin: I’m going with Jimmie Johnson. He and Cliff Daniels showed enough progress late last year that I believe they’ll have no problem making the playoffs in Johnson’s final full-time season.

Jerry Bonkowski: Jimmie Johnson will make the playoffs in his last season as a full-time Cup driver. After missing the playoffs last season, my sense is that Johnson, his team and all of Hendrick Motorsports will do everything they can to get the No. 48 into this year’s playoffs.

What do you think is the biggest change entering this season?

Nate Ryan: The schedule. The first warning will come next week as teams head directly to the West Coast instead of getting their usual breather of a short hop to Atlanta. Homestead-Miami Speedway will be another significant signpost next month, and the need for acclimation will continue to ratchet up (Indianapolis in July; two consecutive weeks off in midsummer) until the final 11 weeks, which will force completely new approaches with a new regular-season finale, two fresh cutoff races and a first-time championship at Phoenix.

Dustin Long: The schedule. For all the reasons listed by others here.

Daniel McFadin: The playoff schedule. It’s teed up by the regular season finale at Daytona and then we get a playoff run that includes: Darlington, Richmond, a little track called Bristol, the Roval, Talladega, a penultimate race at Martinsville and then the finale at Phoenix. If not for the third round featuring consecutive races on 1.5-mile tracks, I’d say that’s the best playoff lineup you could ask for.

Jerry Bonkowski: Not having one series entitlement sponsor for the first time since Winston came into the sport in 1971, followed by Nextel, Sprint and Monster Energy between 2004 and last season is the biggest change in my mind. Instead, there will be four sponsors who will share segments of this year’s season, while the overall series will be simply called the NASCAR Cup Series.

 

Who is your favorite for Cup Rookie of the Year?

Nate Ryan: He won’t be regarded as the favorite, but Tyler Reddick would be my pick.

Dustin Long: Christopher Bell to win a close battle.

Daniel McFadin: My gut tells me Cole Custer. I have more confidence in Custer competing for an organization like Stewart-Haas Racing right now than Tyler Reddick at Richard Childress Racing or Christopher Bell at Leavine Family Racing, a satellite of Joe Gibbs Racing. SHR’s Cup operation is just stronger right now than the other two.

Jerry Bonkowski: This is a tough one. All three of the top rookies – Tyler Reddick, Cole Custer and Christopher Bell – are worthy candidates. Reddick won six Xfinity races last season for Richard Childress Racing, but stepping up to the Cup Series is another story: RCR went winless in Cup last season, won just one race in 2018 and has only three total Cup wins since 2014. Reddick – and RCR – will have to take their game up several notches if Reddick is to win Rookie of the Year honors.

Christopher Bell gets married

Christopher Bell
Gett Images
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Christopher Bell is a married man.

The Leavine Family Racing driver tied the knot this weekend with Morgan Kemenah.

The couple got engaged in December 2018.

The wedding comes one week before Bell takes to the race track in a Cup car for the first time at Daytona International Speedway.

 

Meet the NASCAR Cup rookie Class of 2020

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One of the most talented and promising rookie classes in recent NASCAR Cup history is ready to get its motor racing.

Six drivers have declared for their first full Cup season as well as being eligible for Rookie of the Year honors.

Highlighting the Class of 2020 are the so-called “Big 3,” Christopher Bell, Cole Custer and two-time Xfinity Series champion Tyler Reddick, who all reached the Xfinity Championship 4 round at Miami.

Also in the rookie class are Brennan Poole, John Hunter Nemechek and Quin Houff. Each of the six has an opportunity to become the first full-time rookie to win a Cup race since Chris Buescher did so in 2016.

Here’s a breakdown of each rookie class member (in alphabetical order):

Christopher Bell (Getty Images)

Christopher Bell
2020 team: Leavine Family Racing
2019 team: Joe Gibbs Racing (Xfinity Series)
Number of Cup starts to date: 0
Career Xfinity/Trucks wins: 16/7
What’s ahead: Bell makes the long-anticipated move to the Cup Series in 2020. Because his former Xfinity Series team, Joe Gibbs Racing, had a full driver roster in the Cup Series, Bell has been farmed out to Leavine Family Racing in a partnership/technical alliance with JGR, similar to when JGR placed Erik Jones with Furniture Row Racing in 2017 (which was also the year Bell won the Truck Series championship). Bell will be sponsored by Rheem and Procore and his crew chief from the Xfinity Series, Jason Ratcliff, follows him as his Cup crew chief. Bell replaces Matt DiBenedetto, who has moved on to take the place of Paul Menard at Wood Brothers Racing, who has stepped away from Cup racing

Cole Custer (Getty Images)

Cole Custer
2020 team: Stewart-Haas Racing
2019 team: Stewart-Haas Racing (Xfinity Series)
Number of Cup starts to date: 3 (all in 2018; best finish was 25th at Las Vegas)
Career Xfinity/Trucks wins: 9/2
What’s ahead: Like Bell and Reddick, it’s time for Custer to make the big jump from the Xfinity Series to the Cup Series. Custer will drive the No. 41 Ford, replacing Daniel Suarez, whose racing plans for 2020 are still unclear. Custer had a breakthrough season in the Xfinity Series in 2019, earning a career-best seven wins, 17 top-five and 24 top-10 finishes. He also finished second in the Xfinity Series for the second straight season. He’ll bring his Xfinity crew chief Mike Shiplett to the same role in Cup. … Is the son of SHR general manager Joe Custer.

Quin Houff (Getty Images)

Quin Houff
2020 team: StarCom Racing
2019 team: Split Cup season between 13 starts for Spire Motorsports and four starts for Premium Motorsports)
Number of Cup starts to date: 17, all in 2019 (best finish 28th in Coca-Cola 600)
Career Xfinity/Trucks wins: 0
What’s ahead: The 22-year-old Houff replaces Landon Cassill in the No. 00 Chevrolet. Houff’s contract covers both the 2020 and 2021 seasons. … Houff competed in 17 Cup races last season but remains eligible for Rookie of the Year honors in 2020. … No crew chief has been named for the team yet; Joe Williams was crew chief for Cassill last season but was released from the team after the season-ending race at Miami. … Houff’s racing resume includes not only his 17 Cup starts last year, but also 10 career Xfinity starts, one ARCA Menards West start, five ARCA Menards Series starts and 19 CARS Super Late Model Tour starts.

John Hunter Nemechek (Getty Images)

John Hunter Nemechek
2020 team: Front Row Motorsports
2019 team: GMS Racing (Xfinity Series)
Number of Cup starts to date: 3 (all in 2019, best finish 21st in fall Texas race)
Career Xfinity/Trucks wins: 1/6
What’s ahead: The son of veteran NASCAR driver Joe Nemechek moves to Front Row Motorsports to drive the No. 38 Ford Mustang in 2020 after 1 ½ seasons of racing in the Xfinity Series. He earned one career Xfinity win (2018 at Kansas), but reached victory lane six times while driving a Truck (2013-2019). … Barely missed making the Xfinity Championship 4 round at Miami; finished seventh in the season standings. … Takes over the No. 38 from David Ragan, who has retired from active full-time racing in the Cup Series. Ragan’s former crew chief, Seth Barbour, remains in that role with Nemechek

Brennan Poole (Getty Images)

Brennan Poole
2020 team: Premium Motorsports
2019 team: On Point Motorsports (Truck Series)
Number of Cup starts to date: 0
Career Xfinity/Trucks wins: 0/0
What’s ahead: Poole is slated to compete in his first full season since the 2017 Xfinity campaign. He was supposed to run a full slate in 2019 in the Truck Series, but On Point Motorsports was forced to scale back plans due to sponsorship issues. Still, he managed to score one top-five and four top-10 finishes in 13 starts for the underfunded team. … Poole has never driven in a Cup race before, but he has 83 starts in the Xfinity Series, including eight top five and 36 top-10 finishes. … Crew chief is NASCAR veteran Pat Tryson.

Tyler Reddick (Getty Images)

Tyler Reddick
2020 team: Richard Childress Racing
2019 team: Richard Childress Racing (Xfinity Series)
Number of Cup starts to date: 2 (both in 2019, best finish of ninth at Kansas 1)
Career Xfinity/Trucks wins: 9/3
What’s ahead: After winning consecutive Xfinity Series championships, Reddick moves up to the Cup Series in the No. 8 Chevrolet, replacing Daniel Hemric. It’s notable that Reddick won the 2018 Xfinity championship with JR Motorsports, and then won the 2019 title with RCR. … Caterpillar will once again sponsor the car. … Randall Burnett will be Reddick’s crew chief.

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