Kyle Petty

NBC Sports

NASCAR America at 5 p.m. ET: 2020 NASCAR Hall class revealed, followed by IndyCar Live

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On today’s edition of NASCAR America presents MotorMouths (5 to 6 p.m. ET) on NBCSN, we’ll bring you all the latest news from the revelation of the NASCAR Hall of Fame’s Class of 2020 inductees.

NASCAR on NBC analysts Kyle Petty and Hall of Famer Dale Jarrett will be joined on MotorMouths by SiriusXM NASCAR Radio morning team Mike Bagley and Pete Pistone.

Right after the show, make sure to stay tuned for IndyCar Live from 6 to 6:30 p.m. ET with Kevin Lee from Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

If you can’t catch either of today’s shows on TV, watch online at http:/nascarstream.nbcsports.com. If you plan to stream the show on your laptop or portable device, be sure to have your username and password from your cable/satellite/telco provider handy so your subscription can be verified.

Once you enter that information, you’ll have access to the stream.

Click here at 5 p.m. ET to watch live via the stream.

NASCAR America MotorMouths at 5 p.m. ET with special guest Ryan Newman

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Today’s episode of NASCAR America MotorMouths airs from 5-6 p.m. ET on NBCSN, with Krista Voda, Steve Letarte, Kyle Petty and Nate Ryan.

Cup driver Ryan Newman will be a call-in guest.

If you can’t catch today’s show on TV, watch it online at http:/nascarstream.nbcsports.com. If you plan to stream the show on your laptop or portable device, be sure to have your username and password from your cable/satellite/telco provider handy so your subscription can be verified.

Once you enter that information, you’ll have access to the stream.

Click here at 5 p.m. ET to watch live via the stream.

Also, immediately afterward, tune in to the NASCAR America Debrief show on the NBC Sports’ YouTube channel at 6 p.m. ET with Ryan, Letarte and Petty.

NASCAR America Motormouths at 5 p.m. ET on NBCSN

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Today’s episode of NASCAR America presents Motormouths airs from 5-6 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

Rutledge Wood, Kyle Petty and A.J. Allmendinger will share their thoughts on the big stories of the day, as well as take phone calls from fans.

If you can’t catch today’s show on TV, watch it online at http:/nascarstream.nbcsports.com. If you plan to stream the show on your laptop or portable device, be sure to have your username and password from your cable/satellite/telco provider handy so your subscription can be verified.

Once you enter that information, you’ll have access to the stream.

Click here at 5 p.m. ET to watch live via the stream.

Coffee With Kyle: Legendary NASCAR broadcaster Ken Squier (Parts 1 & 2)

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This week’s two-part “Coffee With Kyle” is a sure-to-be classic with a classic broadcaster, NASCAR Hall of Famer Ken Squier.

Kyle Petty visited Squier at the radio station which has been in his family since 1930, WDEV Radio/Radio Free Vermont, in Waterbury, Vermont (Squier still works at the station today, including giving daily sports updates).

It’s where Squier got his start at the tender age of 15, calling sprint car and midget car races in his home state.

That was where I decided I would spend the rest of my life,” Squier told Petty. “God, I loved those cars and I had to find a way to do it (for his profession).”

Squier’s life has been split between covering NASCAR and short track racing. At the age of 25, and a 10-year veteran of motorsports by that point, Squier was part of a group that built Thunder Road International Speedbowl – a high-banked, quarter-mile asphalt oval that still operates today.

A few years after that, Squier helped co-found and began calling NASCAR races for the Motor Racing Network. Both his life and the sport of NASCAR would never be the same.

Squier became the voice of NASCAR at first. But then he eventually moved in front of the TV camera to become the face of NASCAR as well for ABC, then CBS and TBS.

Shortly after World War II, Squier met fellow legendary broadcaster Chris Economaki, who became a close friend and a mentor to the lanky kid from Vermont.

He became the singular voice,” Squier said of Economaki. “I was fascinated by him. He really understood (racing).”

Then in a humorous twist, Squier compared his own “racing career” with that of Economaki.

He, too, started out to be a racer; I think he ran one race,” Squier said. “I thought I was the next Indianapolis star.

I ran a couple heats (in a local race in Vermont) and a guy in a six-cylinder Plymouth and I went down into Turn 1 and I knew no one had ever surpassed what I was doing in that corner.

This guy pulled up alongside me, waved and went on. I thought, ‘Well, maybe I have to rethink all this.’”

Among some of the most notable accomplishments of Squier’s career was not only calling so many races – including every Daytona 500 from 1979 through 1997 – but also some of the great phraseology that Squier brought to the sport, including the following:

* “These are ordinary people doing extraordinary things.

* “Common men doing uncommon deeds.

* “The Great American Race,” which became the motto of the Daytona 500

* “The Alabama Gang”

Check out Part 1 of Petty’s interview with Squier in the video above.

And then when you’re done, click the video below for Part 2 of the interview.

Follow @JerryBonkowski

NASCAR America Motormouths: Biggest takeaway in first 7 Cup races

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The NASCAR America crew on Wednesday’s “Motormouths” edition gave fans an education, so to speak.

When host Marty Snider asked “what’s your biggest takeaway in the first seven races of the year,” analysts Kyle Petty and A.J. Allmendinger broke things down on what has stood out the most to them through the first one-fifth of the NASCAR Cup season.

First, here’s what Petty had to say:

My takeaway this past week is optimism. I think that finally the package is coming into its own at a decent racetrack where we can see it really work. I didn’t see it at Atlanta, didn’t see it at Phoenix, you heard drivers complain about what it was doing, and we didn’t see what we thought we were going to see.

My biggest takeaway is there’s two organizations (Joe Gibbs Racing and Team Penske) that are just kicking everybody’s rear end, and there are some teams that have not risen to the occasion that I really thought would be in the mix right now, like the Hendrick organization. I think they did show up (at Texas), but I didn’t see them show up in the first six races – I’ll say Chase showed up at Martinsville.

They obviously took the first four to five races and said they have to do something, they have to revamp, and that shows the power of Hendrick Motorsports. You know how hard it is, when you start a season behind, you don’t catch up until you go to the next season a lot of times. An organization like Hendrick can be behind and catch up quick.”

Next, it was Allmendinger’s turn. And his admitted “shocker,” to no one’s surprise, was not a shocker at all:

This may not be a shocker to anybody, but Kyle Busch can pretty much drive anything in any type of package. I know Denny Hamlin won this weekend and he won at Daytona, and some of it was Kyle’s mistake like hitting the fence in traffic, but if that didn’t happen he’s still probably going to win the race.

It’s just crazy to me how good the guy is at figuring out and that 18 team as a whole, no matter what they give us, meaning NASCAR, that they’re going to go out and figure out how to make him fastest and Kyle Busch, more often than not, is going to figure out how to drive it better than anybody else – and he’s doing that.”

Petty wrapped up the back-and-forth by echoing Allmendinger’s take on Busch:

Kyle Busch is in a position where he can look back on a year and say there’s three that I just messed up, where most drivers look at the end of the year and say there’s three that I only had a shot to win. He has a shot legitimately to win every single week we go to the racetrack so far.”

Follow @JerryBonkowski