Getty Images

Winning becoming same old, same old for Kevin Harvick

Leave a comment

Winning is never mundane for a Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series driver, but it’s starting to look that way for Kevin Harvick.

After winning Saturday night’s All-Star Race, Harvick walked into the media center at Charlotte Motor Speedway notably subdued, which prompted a question regarding his seeming lack of enthusiasm.

“I got a 4-month old baby at home,” he said. “I showed up this morning. I held my little girl at, I don’t know, 7:30, 8 a.m. I drove to the race track. I practiced. I went back, watched my son’s baseball game. I drove back for the drivers meeting. I had four appearances. I sat and laid on the couch for an hour, watched the race. Then I came back out and did driver intros, ran the race.

“If your ass wouldn’t be tired by now, I don’t know who you are. But I’m beat. I felt like I gave it a full effort today. If I’m subdued, I’m sorry. I’m really happy that we won the race. I’m really excited for my team and organization and sponsors and everybody. But I’m tired. Got to remember, I’m old. When I leave here, I’m going to go home, I drink too many more of these Busch beers, I might be asleep in the car.”

Before he hauled his tired butt into the media center, Harvick did something no one thought possible in 2018. He drove away from the field in the All-Star Race with a new rules package that was supposed to keep that from happening.

In a race marked by a substantial amount of passing throughout the field, Harvick took the lead from Ricky Stenhouse Jr. on Lap 6 and built a sizable lead in the first of four stages.

After losing positions during the pit stop at the end of the first stage, Harvick had to fight his way through traffic and did not regain the lead until near the end of the third stage.

“Hey, everything’s going our way,” Harvick said. “We have really fast cars. Everybody is executing. The pit crew didn’t have a great first stop with the tire getting hung in the fender, but they rebounded with a great pit stop on the next stop and gained a spot or two there. That’s what you want out of an experienced team, whether it’s the pit crew, the crew chief, the driver. When something goes wrong, you got to be able to overcome it, refocus, move forward.”

It was Harvick’s sixth win of the year, and although it was a non-points event, it marks the second time this season that he has won three consecutive races – putting another stamp on his claim to be the most dominant driver on a weekly basis.

The trick to success is not to allow winning to become mundane – no matter how it looks to the competition or the fans.

“It’s racing like you’re losing,” Harvick said after winning his second career All-Star Race. “If you can trick yourself into doing that every week, not get too high during the highs, really feel like you need to keep pushing to make things better, that’s really the mindset that everybody has right now.”

It might be easy to dismiss his current string of success in the belief that Harvick, crew chief Rodney Childers and the No. 4 team have found something through the first 12 races of 2018 that everyone else is missing. And while that may be partially true in terms of his success in points paying races, that element was missing from his All-Star victory.

The commonality between Harvick’s win Saturday night and the five points victories so far this year is the dedication and experience of the team – something that predates 2018.

“I don’t feel like that’s really a different position than we’ve been in four out of the five last years,” Harvick said. “Last year was obviously a building year for us. I think that’s the one thing that is the great part about this team, is we’ve been in a position to obviously win the championship in 2014. ’15 had a great year, won a bunch of races. We’ve been in position to have been successful before. I think that the experience of the team and the organization and all the racers that come into that shop day after day kind of sets the tone of the expectations, but also having been in a lot of these situations before with each other.

“I’m proud of them all. That to me is more important than the money and everything that comes with it because everybody puts so much time with it. There’s nothing better than seeing them all high-five in Victory Lane.”

Two weeks after taking home one of NASCAR’s most distinctive trophies – a concrete Miles the Monster holding a diecast replica of the No. 4 car for is AAA 400 win – Harvick was excited to give his son Keelan another piece of art for his playroom.

“Man, I like the trophy, to tell you the truth. I’ll take the money, for sure. All the kids think it’s Lightning McQueen’s Piston Cup. I’m sure that’s (what) mine will think about it when he wakes up and sees it in the morning.”

Harvick’s son was impressed, but he is beginning to reassess his priorities. After waking up the morning after Kevin’s $1 million win, Keelan said “cool trophy where’s the money?”

NASCAR America: Keelan Harvick is stronger than Miles the Monster

Leave a comment

Kevin Harvick’s victory in the AAA 400 at Dover International Speedway was his second at the track and he hopes this trophy fares better than his first one.

Harvick’s first Dover win in October 2015 was also earned with Stewart-Haas Racing. His son Keelan Harvick was so taken by the trophy – which features a replica of Miles the Monster holding the winning car – that he asked for it to be kept in his playroom.

It took just one day for Keelan to break the arm off of the concrete monster.

Keelan will have a second chance with Sunday’s trophy.

“We’ll put it in the same spot in the playroom for a while,” Harvick said after the race. “We’ll have to go hose it off first because it smells like beer. It’s always strange trying to explain to people why his playroom smells like beer.”

For more, watch the above video.

Kevin and DeLana Harvick welcome second child, daughter Piper Grace

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Welcome to the world, Piper Grace Harvick.

Kevin and DeLana Harvick welcomed their second child, and first daughter, on Thursday, with Kevin making the announcement official on his Twitter page Saturday morning.

Piper Grace was born a little early. She was expected to arrive in early January.

Her older brother, five-year-old Keelan – who originally broke the news of his sister-to-be back in July on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio – is excited to officially be a big brother now.

Mom, daughter, dad and big brother are all doing well.

Congratulations to the Harvicks and their newest family member.

Keelan Harvick has big family news: he’s going to be a big brother soon

Image courtesy Kevin Harvick official Twitter page
1 Comment

There’s big news in the Harvick family. The question is who has the bigger news: Kevin and wife DeLana are going to have a second child, or son Keelan will become a big brother for the first time.

Momma and Papa Harvick left it to Keelan to make the big announcement on social media that he’ll soon have a little sister.

Kevin then discussed it further on his weekly Happy Hours show on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio.

Congratulations to the Harvicks. The big happy family will soon be a bit bigger.

 

Kevin then took Keelan’s message to Tuesday’s edition of Happy Hour on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio:

Kevin Harvick addresses how he will know when it is time to retire

Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images
1 Comment

Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s announcement that he’ll retire from the Cup series at the end of this season has the focus turning to other drivers age 40 and older and when they might leave the sport.

Former champion Kevin Harvick, who is 41, addressed how much longer he’ll race on his show “Happy Hours” Tuesday night on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio.

“I can tell you that I have four more years left on my contact at Stewart-Haas Racing,’’ said Harvick, who signed an extension last year with the organization. “To me that would be the time when you sit back and re-evaluate things as to what you do going forward, just for the fact of where is (son) Keelan at in school? It’s very important for us to be involved as parents That’s my main priority to be the father figure in his life and make sure he’s progressing and doing the things he needs to do moving forward. There’s definitely a family aspect of that decision and where we are as a family and how the sport is affecting our life.

“I think from a competition side of things, that’s what drives me. I love the fact of the challenge that comes with, ‘All right, we’re not running good, what have we go to do to fix things?’ When you’re running good, how do you maintain those things.

“That competition of pulling into that garage every week and looking over at the guy next to you and saying, ‘Man I want to kick that guy’s butt, and I want to run good this week,’ and the motivation of showing up at the shop and being a part of the team — when that goes away that’s probably when I’ll just say, ‘Adios.’ ’’

Harvick was on the show with wife DeLana, who talked about how their plans have changed over the years.

“The funny thing is when Kevin first started and we got married (in 2001), we both agreed it was going to be 40,’’ she said of when he would retire from racing. “That was our drop-dead date, he was going to retire at 40 no matter what had happened. We passed that.

“When you’re younger, you sort of try to put things into perspective. We never thought we’d be 40 when we were in our 20s. Now we’re here in our 40s. Part of the reason that we waited to have Keelan so much later is that Kevin wanted to be a part of those things. I don’t know if he actually knows that because I ask him all the time with everybody with Jeff, Tony and Carl and now obviously with Dale Jr. I kind of try to poke and prod a little bit, and I don’t get very far with him because I’m not sure that it’s something these guys ever really like to think about. That was a question I have for you, Kevin, when you see your peers starting to do this, is it something that becomes more present in your mind? Do bad days make it worse, or how do you sort of compartmentalize as it comes to your career?’’

Said Harvick: “I think you’re always thinking about when do you retire.  When is the right time to retire, especially when you get into a certain part of your life? I think performance definitely has a lot to do with it.

“As you look at running good or running bad, you look at a situation like (Greg) Biffle had, it all just timed out wrong, and he wound up not doing anything this year and out of the car. Dale announcing his retirement. I think when you look at Tony’s situation, there were a number of things that happened that led up to Tony saying, ‘I’m done with it’  maybe had something to do with in the car, out of the car, but there were some things that led up to that. I think when you looked at Jeff, I think he just said ‘OK I’m going to retire here because of whatever reasons.’ I think it’s different for everybody.

“When you look at my situation, I’m kind of a late bloomer on the racing side of things because we’ve had so much success over ether last three years at Stewart-Haas Racing, winning a championship That’s the performance that I’ve wanted my whole career. It’s not like we didn’t perform well at RCR, but we didn’t win a championship. We won races, but we’ve done it consistently over the last three years. For me that’s the most fulfilling part of what I do and what I put into my career.’’

Harvick, the 2014 champion, enters Sunday’s Cup race at Richmond International Raceway ninth in the points after his third-place finish on Monday at Bristol.

 and on Facebook