Joe Gibbs

Photo courtesy: ARCA Menards Series

Ty Gibbs wins second ARCA race of season

Leave a comment

Ty Gibbs, grandson of NASCAR team owner and former Super Bowl winning head coach Joe Gibbs, won his second race of the season in Saturday’s ARCA Menards Series General Tire 150 at Kentucky Speedway.

The 17-year-old Gibbs beat runner-up Bret Holmes to the checkered flag by 1.247 seconds. It was Holmes’ best career finish in 67 starts in ARCA competition. Points leader Michael Self finished third, followed by Sam Mayer and Drew Dollar.

Gibbs has now won two of the four starts he’s made in the series this season. He also won at Pocono, finished third in his season opener at Phoenix and was 15th last week at Indianapolis.

Gibbs has now won seven races across the ARCA Menards, East and West series over the previous two seasons.

With Satuday’s victory, Gibbs became Kentucky Speedway’s youngest race winner at 17 years, nine months and seven days, breaking the previous mark held by two-time NASCAR Cup champion Kyle Busch, who had just turned 18 when he won at the 1.5-mile track back in 2003.

Hailie Deegan wrecked on Lap 77 and finished 14th, dropping her from second to fourth in the point standings, 24 points now behind series leader Michael Self.

The ARCA Menards Series’ next race is next Saturday, July 18, at Iowa Speedway, the seventh race of the season. It will be televised live on MAVTV and streamed on TrackPass on NBC Gold.

Click here for Saturday’s race results.

 

Follow @JerryBonkowski

Long: Drivers unite for Bubba Wallace on a day the sport won’t forget

1 Comment

As he stood near Bubba Wallace and looked at the drivers and crew members behind them on pit road at Talladega Superspeedway, seven-time Cup champion Jimmie Johnson welled with pride.

The vivid collection of uniforms featured people of different color and different backgrounds united to support Wallace a day after a noose was found in his team’s garage stall at the track.

While the FBI investigated, the Alabama governor pledged support and NASCAR President Steve Phelps decried the “terrible, terrible act,” drivers found a way to show, as Johnson said, that “whoever did what they did is hopefully watching and realizes that not here, not in our sport.”

Change is sweeping NASCAR. No longer are fans being asked not to bring the Confederate flag to the track, they’re being told not to do so. Drivers are speaking up about social injustice more than they have. They’re listening and learning.

Monday, they stood with Wallace.

They gathered at Wallace’s car on pit road before the race. Johnson said on a group chat for drivers that he planned to stand with Wallace for the national anthem and invited his competitors to join him.

Kevin Harvick suggested they push Wallace’s car from its 24th starting spot to the end of pit road and the front of the field. Crew members walked with them. Joining them was 82-year-old team owner Richard Petty, who made the No. 43 that Wallace drives famous but never saw a day like Monday.

As Wallace started to climb from his car after being pushed by his competitors down pit road, he buried his head. Petty, who had not attended a race since the COVID-19 pandemic, comforted Wallace.

The day before had all seemed well to Wallace until Phelps told him about the noose in the garage stall. Wallace’s mother, Desiree, said on SiriusXM that when her son told her what happened, “at first he looked defeated.

“I said, ‘Look, that was an act of fear. I said they’re more afraid of you than you are of them. I said it was a cowardly act. I said and, at the end of the day, you don’t allow them to strip away your character or your integrity.”

Later Sunday night Wallace told Ryan Blaney, one of his closest friends what happened.

“I couldn’t find the words to describe how I felt,” said Blaney, who won Monday’s race. “I felt a mixture of anger and sadness for him, confused how anybody could do something like this. I just felt all these different emotions. I know he went through a big range.

“You hate to see your buddies or anybody you love be sad and be hurting. I tried to support him the best I could. Gave him a big hug before he left. I think it was just a multiple range of emotions. Last night I was really angry. I couldn’t fall asleep.”

Some drivers weren’t aware of what happened until Monday morning.

“My immediate reaction was just speechless,” Aric Almirola said. “I couldn’t believe that somebody would do that.”

Almirola, who says he wouldn’t have gotten the chance to compete in NASCAR’s highest levels had he not been a part of a diversity program set up by Joe Gibbs and the late Reggie White, finished third in Monday’s race.

“So growing up trying to race as a Cuban American, sure, I’ve had things said to me, things that were offensive, that hurt,” Almirola said. “I actually told Bubba (Monday) morning that on a very, very small scale I can relate and I can empathize. I have never had to go through what he’s had to go through in the last couple weeks, and especially in the last 24 hours. I feel for him immensely.

“I think that the sport has worked so hard since I got my opportunity in 2004 to adapt. I think forever NASCAR has been considered an All‑American sport. All of America has changed and evolved a lot over time. I think that NASCAR has done an incredible job of being inclusive and making sure that the garage area, the spectators, the fan area, that they all resemble all of America.”

That was evident Monday. Talladega was allowed to have up to 5,000 fans and Wallace, who finished 14th, walked to them and slapped hands through the fence. A few fans wore Black Lives Matter shirts.

“Look, first (time) fans right here, from Atlanta,” Wallace said in an interview with Fox after the race. “That is so cool. This sport is changing. The deal that happened (Sunday), sorry I’m not wearing my mask, but I wanted to show whoever it was you’re not going to take my smile and I’m going to keep on going.”

It’s not just him that will keep going but all of NASCAR.

 and on Facebook

Joe Gibbs’ 17-year-old grandson takes 5th career ARCA win

Leave a comment

Ty Gibbs, 17-year-old grandson of NASCAR team owner Joe Gibbs, held off rival Sam Mayer in a two-lap overtime shootout to win Saturday’s ARCA Menards East Series race at Toledo (Ohio) Speedway.

It was the younger Gibbs’ first win in the East Series and his fifth overall in the last two years between the ARCA Menards, East and West series. The race also marked the first ARCA race held since the COVID-19 pandemic hiatus.

The win avenges a runner-up finish for Gibbs last season at Toledo.

“It’s really good to come back out here and get a win,” Ty Gibbs told ARCARacing.com. “I was able to move up a spot, which is always a fun time.”

The East Series rookie dominated, leading 183 of the 204 laps around the paved half-mile oval.

Mayer, defending East champion, finished second, followed by Bret Holmes and Rev Racing teammates Chase Cabre and Nick Sanchez.

The race will air this Thursday on NBCSN at 3 p.m. ET.

Follow @JerryBonkowski

Wednesday’s Cup race at Darlington: Start time, lineup and more

Leave a comment

Let’s go again.

The NASCAR Cup Series looks to race again Wednesday night at Darlington Raceway (weather permitting). The race is scheduled to be the the second of five Cup races in a 14-day period. The stretch began with Sunday’s 400-mile event at Darlington won by Kevin Harvick.

Wednesday’s race is scheduled for 311 miles (500 kilometers).

Here is the info for today’s race.

(All times are Eastern)

START: Guy Fieri will give the command to start engines at 6:14 p.m. The green flag is scheduled to wave for the Toyota 500 at 6:26 p.m.

PRERACE: Garage access health screening begins at 10 a.m. (teams are assigned specific times). Engine prime and final adjustments at 4 p.m. Driver/crew chief meeting is at 4:30 p.m. on NASCAR.com. Drivers report to their cars at 5:50 p.m. The invocation will be given at 6:05 p.m. by car owner Joe Gibbs. The National Anthem will be performed at 6:06 p.m. by Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter Jewel.

DISTANCE: The race is 228 laps (311 miles/500k) around the 1.366-mile oval.

PACE LAP: At the direction of race control, drivers will have the opportunity to run one pace lap down pit road before the green flag for a pit road speed check. If drivers stop in their box for any reason, pull over or slow down, they will start at the rear of the field.

COMPETITION CAUTION: Lap 25

STAGES: Stage 1 ends on Lap 60. Stage 2 ends on Lap 125.

TV/RADIO: FS1 will televise the race. Motor Racing Network will broadcast the race and can also be heard at mrn.com. SiriusXM NASCAR Radio will carry MRN’s broadcast.

FORECAST: The wunderground.com forecast calls for scattered thunderstorms with a high of 65 degrees and 34% chance of rain at the race’s start.

LAST RACE: Kevin Harvick dominated Sunday’s race at Darlington, leading 159 of 293 laps to record his 50th career series win. Alex Bowman finished second. Kurt Busch placed third.

LINEUP (top 20 finishers from Sunday inverted, rest start where finished): Click here for Cup starting lineup

PENALTIES: BJ McLeod will start at the rear of the field and serve a drive through penalty at the start of the race for multiple inspection failures. Corey LaJoie will start from the rear for multiple inspection failures. Erik Jones will start from the rear for unapproved adjustments.

CATCHING UP TO SPEED WITH NBC SPORTS COVERAGE:

Matt Kenseth: Tyler Reddick is “just incredibly talented”

Bump & Run: Who impressed most at Darlington?

NASCAR suspends one crew chief, fines five others for Darlington

Kevin Harvick aware of “responsibility” that comes with 50+ Cup wins

Kevin Harvick to run race-winning car again at Darlington 

Winners and losers from Sunday’s Darlington race

Instead of stripe, Darlington gives two rookies pat on back Sunday

Long: Sunday was a day unlike any other in NASCAR

 

Ryan Newman in serious condition; injuries not life threatening

Photo by Brian Lawdermilk/Getty Images
Leave a comment

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Ryan Newman is in serious condition with non-life-threatening injuries after a last-lap crash in Monday’s rain-delayed Daytona 500.

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR executive vice president and chief racing development officer, read a statement at 10:06 p.m. ET from Roush Yates Racing reporting Newman’s condition and that Newman was being treated at Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach.

UPDATE: Steve Newmark, president of Roush Fenway Racing, issued this statement at 11:51 a.m. ET Tuesday:

Newman, 42, was injured after a chaotic last lap. He passed Denny Hamlin for the lead on the backstretch, getting a push from Ryan Blaney.

Exiting Turn 4, Blaney went low to challenge for the lead. Newman dropped down the track to block. Blaney hit Newman. The contact turned Newman’s car to the right. He slammed the outside wall and turned upside down. Corey LaJoie’s car slammed into Newman’s car on the driver side. Newman’s car crossed the finish line sliding on its roof with sparks flying. The No. 6 Ford car came to rest just beyond the exit of pit road.

“We were coming so fast, it’s hard to make a quick move, especially with someone pushing you,” Blaney said after the race. “(Newman) blocked the top and he blocked the bottom, too. At that point, when he blocked the bottom, I was just committed to pushing him to the win, trying to get a Ford the win. I thought I was pretty square but it got him to the right. I hope he’s alright. That looked really bad. Definitely unintentional. I was committed to pushing him to the win. It sucks to lose the race, but you never want to see anyone get hurt.”

Newman, beginning his 19th Cup season, was credited with ninth place. Hamlin won the race for the second consecutive year and third time in his career.

It took safety workers 10 minutes to remove Newman from the car. Screens were placed around the car to prevent spectators from viewing safety crews attending to Newman. After he was removed from the car, Newman was immediately transported by ambulance to a local hospital at 8:09 p.m. ET.

LaJoie tweeted: “Dang, I hope Newman is ok. That is worse case scenario and I had nowhere to go but smoke.”

NASCAR announced late Monday that it will take the cars of Newman and LaJoie back to its R&D Center to further examine.

Car owner Joe Gibbs apologized after the race for his team celebrating Hamlin’s win because they were not aware of the severity of the crash until they had reached victory lane.

“I apologize to everybody, but we really didn’t know,” Gibbs said after the race.

Said Hamlin: “Someone’s health and their family is bigger than any win in any sport.”

O’Donnell read a statement that said: “Ryan Newman is being treated at Halifax Medical Center. He’s in serious condition but doctors have indicated his injuries are non-life threatening. We appreciate your thoughts and prayers and ask that you respect the privacy of Ryan and his family during this time. We appreciate your patience and cooperation and will provide more information as it becomes available.”

Mark Rushbrook, global director, Ford Performance Motorsports, stated: “We’re grateful for the news about Ryan. We had been waiting for information just like everyone else, so to hear some positive news tonight is a relief. Ryan has been an important part of the Roush Fenway and Ford NASCAR program this past year, and he is so respected for being a great competitor by everyone in the sport.  The entire Ford family is sending positive thoughts for his recovery, but our first thoughts remain with his family and his team.”

President Donald J. Trump tweeted that prayers for Newman. Trump gave the command to start the Daytona 500 on Sunday and met with some drivers before the race. Newman attended a rally for Trump in 2016 during Trump’s campaign.