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K&N Series to hold doubleheaders with IndyCar, World of Outlaws

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NASCAR K&N Pro Series teams will take part for the first time in doubleheaders with the World of Outlaws and IndyCar Series next year.

The first doubleheader, with the World of Outlaws, will take place Feb. 27 – 28 at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway Dirt Track. It serves as a lead-in for the tripleheader weekend at Las Vegas Motor Speedway for NASCAR’s three national series.

The World of Outlaws will compete on the LVMS Dirt Track on both days of the doubleheader, holding its FVP Platinum Battery Outlaw Showdown presented by Star Nursery.

The K&N Pro Series West will hold its second race on the half-mile dirt track on Feb. 28.

The 2018 Star Nursery 100, won by Sheldon Creed, marked the first K&N Pro Series race on a dirt track since 1979.

The LVMS Dirt Track has hosted World of Outlaws events since 1996 and has held double features every spring since 2013.

The doubleheader with IndyCar will take place Aug. 24 at Gateway Motorsports Park outside St. Louis.

The K&N event is a combined race with West and East teams and is the second K&N race at the 1.25-mile track after the series debuted there this year.

IndyCar will hold its third consecutive race at Gateway after returning to the track in 2017.

The K&N/IndyCar weekend is the second doubleheader the track will host in 2019.

The NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series and ARCA Racing Series will visit on June 22.

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Jimmie Johnson intrigued with racing IndyCar, sports cars in the future

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After his “mind-blowing” experience driving a Formula One car, Jimmie Johnson said he would be interested in competing in IndyCar and sports car races when he’s done driving NASCAR.

Johnson’s contract with Hendrick Motorsports expires after the 2020 season and he could try other forms of racing then.

“I’ve been approached many times for the Indy 500,” Johnson said Monday after driving a Formula One car as part of a ride swap with Fernando Alonso. “I’m not overly excited about those fast ovals, but I think with my status and relationships, I could put together some road course races in IndyCar.

“I’d look at anything. I’ve done sports car racing in the past. I’ve finished second in the Rolex 24. Would love to get back to doing that. Anything is open. I’m far from done. I want to keep driving and hopefully I can find some good opportunities.”

The 43-year-old Johnson knows age will slow him at some point but he says not yet. 

“Certainly age is a number and at some point it will start to fade on you, but I think most drivers deeper in their career, the workload that goes with it is what they don’t enjoy,” Johnson said. “For whatever reason, I like to work. From training and suffering, the longer the ride, the longer the run, the better I perform. I just really enjoy working. I don’t subscribe to that you get to a certain age and you can’t do it. I think you get to a certain age and it’s hard to stay motivated to put in the time and I don’t feel like I’m there yet.”

Three of the top four drivers in points in IndyCar last year were age 37 or older, led by 38-year-old series champion Scott Dixon. Tony Kanaan, who turns 44 on Dec. 31, will return to A.J. Foyt Racing for his 21st season of open-wheel racing in the U.S.

Johnson’s focus Monday was on driving a 2013 Formula One car around Bahrain International Circuit. Alonso drove one of Johnson’s Cup cars.

“The sensation of speed, clearly the speed is so high,” the seven-time Cup champion said. “The simulator was a really nice experience, great visual aid but to have the wind moving by and your sensation of speed and G-forces, it takes a little while to kind of absorb that and have the newness of that go away and focus on what you’re doing. I felt like every time I went out, my surroundings went slower and it was easier to piece together my braking points.

“Literally my first outing, my helmet was trying to leave my head, and I was staring at the microphone because my helmet was so high. I got my helmet under control and it was really my eyes trying to find their way far enough ahead and far enough around the turns. At the end, I really quit focusing on the braking markers themselves and was able to look at the apex (of the turns) and had an idea of when to hit the brakes and was able to put together some good laps. It was fun.”

Johnson said the experience could help him when NASCAR races on its road course events.

“Just the philosophy of how the use the car under brakes will be really good for me in the road course racing we will do,” he said. “I will start trying to get more out of the car on the straight line and then get off the brakes … and roll the car through the apex.”

Johnson admits “at the end of the day I got a way better swap experience than (Alonso) did. If we could come for a day or two, get our gearing dialed in, do some suspension changes, the proper tire, the (stock car) could have been quite a bit faster. I rode in a car with him at Abu Dhabi on hot laps and then again today and he should be a dirt racer. He loves to be sideways and smoking the tires.”

Johnson said he encouraged Alonso to drive a stock car on a NASCAR track to get the true experience of the car.

“When you can put them on a banked track, they really have the chance to shine,” Johnson said. “Dover, Bristol, even some of the banked mile-and-a-halves, really impressive. We’ll put a little pressure on him to do it. The way he likes to drive things I don’t see why he would say no.”

Johnson was asked if Alonso would do well on NASCAR’s road courses.

“Oh yeah,” Johnson said. “When you look at Juan (Pablo Montoya), when Juan was able to jump in a Cup car, he was fantastic on those tracks. In talking to Dario (Franchitti), in talking to Juan and Danica (Patrick), they don’t drive a car often with oversteer, so I assume that would be something (Alonso) wouldn’t like, but every time I looked he was dead sideways. Maybe he’s the perfect open-wheel driver to go to a stock car.”

Alonso said his focus for the first part of 2019 will be on the select races he will do, including the Indianapolis 500.

Asked if he could imagine what it would be like to drive a stock car at Daytona International Speedway with 39 other cars, Alonso said: “I told Jimmie before, it’s hard to imagine for me now after the feelings I had today with the very low grip and a lot of problems with traction how this car would feel on oval racing because they are no more traction demanding. That I think is a very different way to drive the car.”

Will Alonso jump in a stock car again?

“For now, it’s OK,” he said. “I have now a couple of weeks off but then immediately at the beginning of the year I will be very busy. I don’t want to put any extra tests or thoughts because I really need to charge the battery.”

Racing at Texas Motor Speedway leaves some frustrated

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FORT WORTH, Texas — Chase Elliott questioned the “entertainment factor” of Sunday’s Cup race at Texas Motor Speedway, but a NASCAR official said that the 2019 rules package, which features less horsepower, could enhance the action there next year.

Drivers talked after this weekend’s races about the challenges of passing at the high-speed 1.5-mile track.

Martin Truex Jr., who started at the rear of the Cup race after an engine change and finished ninth, said passing was “unbelievably impossible.”

Elliott was more blunt.

“I don’t know what genius decided to pave this place or take the banking out of (Turns) 1 and 2,” he said after finishing sixth. “Not a good move for the entertainment factor, in my opinion.”

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR’s chief racing development officer, said next year’s rules package should work well at the track. Teams will have 550 horsepower at Texas next year, along with aero ducts, a larger spoiler, new splitter and radiator pan to help with aerodynamics.

I don’t want to take away from anything Kevin Harvick did,” O’Donnell told the media after Sunday’s race. “Having said that, I think we would all agree on the race entertainment quality between Friday, Saturday and Sunday, there’s a difference. I think we also know that we’ve got a new rules package in place next year that again some of you have not too been too positive about but there’s a reason we’ve got to that, and I think this would be one of the reasons.

Denny Hamlin suggested on Twitter that that is another key ingredient to improving the racing.

Winner Kevin Harvick, who led 177 of 335 laps but had to pass Ryan Blaney late to win, was diplomatic about the challenges of Texas.

“Look, repaves are difficult,” he said. “I think they put in as much effort here as anywhere that we’ve gone. Two years in a row we’ve won a race on the high side. It’s just one of those things where you just have to give it time.

“It’s a really fast racetrack that they came and changed the tires from the first race (this year), so we kind of fixed that problem from the tires blowing out and everything that we had happen in the spring race.”

Texas Motor Speedway was repaved and the banking in Turns 1 and 2 dropped four degrees to 20 degrees. The changes were made before the track’s 2017 races and were a result of issues drying the track that led to a 76-day postponement of the IndyCar race in 2016 and the delay of the 2016 Cup playoff race.

Eddie Gossage, president of Texas Motor Speedway, responded on Twitter to fan complaints about the racing Sunday and asked fans for patience.

NASCAR America at 5 p.m. ET: Scan All Las Vegas, IndyCar’s Scott Dixon

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Today’s NASCAR America airs from 5-6 p.m. ET on NBCSN. Carolyn Manno hosts and is joined by Kyle Petty in Stamford, Connecticut. Jeff Burton joins from his garage.

On today’s show:

  • The Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series playoffs are in full swing, but today the focus is on Charlotte for NASCAR Xfinity Series Playoff Media Day. We’ll hear from playoff drivers Justin Allgaier, Christopher Bell, Elliott Sadler, and others.
  • Five-time IndyCar Series Champion Scott Dixon joins the show to talk about his most recent title.
  • We review Sunday’s playoff race at Las Vegas that saw hot temperatures, high tempers, and several playoff drivers involved in accidents. It’s the latest edition of Scan All.

If you can’t catch today’s show on TV, watch it online at http:/nascarstream.nbcsports.com. If you plan to stream the show on your laptop or portable device, be sure to have your username and password from your cable/satellite/telco provider handy so your subscription can be verified.

Once you enter that information, you’ll have access to the stream.

Click here at 5 p.m. ET to watch live via the stream.

Tony Stewart says Bobby Rahal offered him an Indianapolis 500 ride

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Tony Stewart’s dream of returning to the Indianapolis 500 remains very much alive, but he might be hitting the brakes on next season despite already having an offer.

In an interview with Rutledge Wood (video above) during Sunday’s rain delay at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Stewart said he has been emailed by IndyCar team owner Bobby Rahal about running one of his cars in the Greatest Spectacle of Racing next season.

“And I don’t do emails, so I haven’t even responded to Bobby Rahal yet, so I just found out I had an email from him,” Stewart said, pausing to turn to the camera with a smile. “Sorry Bobby, I don’t do email.”

The delayed response is OK because Stewart seems to be taking himself out of the running already for 2019 after indicating a month ago that he was ready to return to the Indianapolis 500 after an 18-year absence.

“Not this coming year,” he said. “I did what I normally do, I let my mouth open before I thought about what I was saying and mentioned that I was open to the possibility again, and I realistically am.

“The reason I wouldn’t do it next year, I’m not doing it to just do it. I want to do it to try to win the race. If you’re really going to do that, the IndyCar Series is so competitive right now, and the drivers and teams so tough, you’re not going to just stroll in here like they used to do in the ’70s and ’80s and do a good job. I’d want to run an oval race sometime in the coming year to get ready for 2020 if I’m going to do it.

Stewart, who was born and raised in Indiana and lives about an hour south of Indianapolis in Columbus, also said he had talked with team owner Michael Andretti and noted that Roger Penske recently said his offer to drive one of his cars in May remained open. He also believes team owner Chip Ganassi (who fielded Stewart in the 2001 Indy 500, his most recent start) would give him another shot.

The three-time NASCAR champion, who will turn 48 next May, won the 1997 IndyCar championship and has five starts in the Indianapolis 500. In 1999 and ’01, he raced both the Indy 500 and Coca-Cola 600 on the same day.

“I’ve learned to never say never, but you keep doing the math, and I’m pretty sure 49’s probably not a good age to try to resurrect an IndyCar career, but who knows, I’ve done a lot dumber things than that.”