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Kevin Harvick says NASCAR should share any gambling revenue with teams

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Former Cup champion Kevin Harvick wants NASCAR to share any gambling revenue with teams and not keep the money itself.

The Supreme Court’s decision Monday to strike down a 1992 federal law that banned commercial sports betting has states seeking to allow such gaming as soon as possible and leagues looking to collect money off it.

“I want my team to be taken care of,” Harvick said Tuesday night on his SiriusXM NASCAR Radio show. “That’s really the main thing that kind of falls into line here is something of a share in revenue comes down the pipe and even if it is a 1 percent share of revenue, I don’t want it all to go to the league. I think it should be shared with the teams.’’

Harvick said on his show “Happy Hours” that any revenue would be good for teams and help make them — and their charters — more valuable.

“I want to see a business model that works for the current owners and takes these charters from being what they are today to being what something of an NBA franchise or an NFL franchise (is),’’ said Harvick, who closed his racing team after the 2011 season. “I’m not saying from a dollar standpoint but just from (the point that) somebody that can afford to come in and own a race team to say ‘I want to do that because it’s really not going to cost me that much money and down the road it might be worth ‘X’ as we go further down the line.’

“That’s the point we have to get to if you want to make it a real league and make it so that the charters are worth what they need to be. This would be another example of getting that revenue stream a little bit better than what it is today.’’

The NBA has stated it seeks an “integrity fee” of 1 percent of the amount wagered on any of its events. Other leagues also are expected to seek such payment.

Harvick, who has won a series-high five races this year, said NASCAR shouldn’t be left out.

“If we could do something like that, that would be great for everybody,’’ he said.

Harvick also wants to see other changes to the revenue stream for teams. He noted the TV money that comes into the sport. Currently, tracks collect 65 percent, teams receive 25 percent and NASCAR takes 10 percent of the TV money.

International Speedway Corp., citing leading industry sources, stated in its 2017 annual report that the sport’s TV package is valued $8.2 billion over 10 years. The deal goes through the 2024 season.

ISC stated in its 2017 annual report that it received approximately $337.4 million in fiscal year 2017 from TV broadcast and ancillary rights fees.

Speedway Motorsports Inc. stated in its 2017 annual report that it expects its broadcasting revenue to be about $217 million for 2018.

“I think that there should be a bigger piece of the pie that comes out of the TV money that goes to the teams because that’s really the root of Cup racing,” Harvick said. “If you don’t have the teams, and you don’t have those owners that are in there in the garage wanting to be there, then we all don’t have anything to race.’’

Michael Waltrip Racing folded after the 2015 season. Roush Fenway Racing downsized from four to three teams in 2013 and then cut back to two teams in 2017. Richard Childress Racing went from three to two teams for this season. Furniture Row Racing went from two teams to one for this year. BK Racing filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy in February and recently listed total liabilities as $37.7 million.

Team Penske grew from two to three Cup teams this year. StarCom Racing debuted with two races last year and is running the full season this year, leasing a charter from Richard Childress Racing.

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Kevin Harvick on inconsistent pit guns: ‘It’s becoming a safety issue’

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Kevin Harvick heightened talk about pit guns Tuesday night by saying the inconsistent equipment was creating “a safety issue.”

Harvick made his comments on his “Happy Hours’’ show on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio.

Sunday at Texas Motor Speedway, Harvick said the pit guns were “pathetic” and “embarrassing to the sport” after pit gun issues led to loose wheels.

He had more say on his radio show Tuesday night.

“I think in theory, I think the pit gun idea is a good idea,’’ Harvick said. “I just don’t think at this particular point it’s being executed to the point where it’s fair for the race teams and safe. It’s becoming a safety issue.

“We saw five loose wheels on the run that I had a loose wheel on on Sunday. Five cars had loose wheels on that particular run. That is way outside the norm of what we do on a weekly basis. As a driver, I’m very uncomfortable in the car because I don’t know whether, is it a loose wheel, then you see some tire issues creep up during the race. Is it a loose wheel, is it a tire coming apart? In your mind you’re running through these things (thinking) ‘What the hell do I do?’

“If it was the first week where something has happened, it would be like, ‘Oh maybe we just made some mistakes, maybe it could be this or maybe it could be that.’ But there’s so much doubt about what you have as a gun. On Saturday (in the Xfinity race at Texas) it was a rear tire issue. On Sunday, it flipped. The rear tire changer had no problems. His gun turned probably 2,000, 3,000 RPMs more because the front guy drew the short straw on Sunday. It’s kind of Russian Roulette at this particular point.’’

In the first 10 minutes of the discussion of the pit guns, Harvick used the word safety or a form of it eight times.

On Monday, Scott Miller, NASCAR senior vice president of competition, addressed the pit gun issue on “The Morning Drive” on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio.

“Everybody is always quick to blame the gun, not saying that it may not have been a gun problem, but we have to look at everything before we can flat out say we had a gun problem,’’ Miller said. “That’s what we do.

“The program has had a few more hitches in it than, obviously, we wished it would, but we’re making progress with it. We’ll continue to do that and continue to evaluate and continue to try to get better every week and make sure that we dig into whatever problems happen up and down pit road and get them rectified.

“Everything in motorsports is a development process and this is no different. It’s unfortunate that it’s caused some people some problems but development is what it is. We’ll continue to keep it ramped up and get it right.’’

Harvick also cut through the banter Tuesday on what teams voted for and what teams did not vote to go with standard pit guns as a cost-cutting measure before the season.

“For me, I’m in the I don’t care who voted for it, I don’t care what team you’re on, I don’t care what the situation is at this particular point, I want to be safe inside the race car, and I want my wheels to be tight,’’ said Harvick, who has won three of the first seven Cup races of the season. “This is the same type of situation that we went through with the three lug nuts. Is it safe or is it not safe?

“Right now, if you have a good gun, you’re going to have tight wheels. If you don’t have a good gun, and as the race goes on it seems like the guns get progressively worse, they don’t work as well as they do at the beginning of the race. For me, I just want to be safe in the car.’’

Harvick alluded to April 2016 when his boss, Tony Stewart, complained about NASCAR not requiring teams to tighten all five lug nuts on each wheel.

Stewart said then about the lug nut issue: “For all the work and everything, all the bulletins and all the new stuff we have to do to superspeedway cars and all these other things they want us to do for safety, we can’t even make sure we put five lug nuts on the wheel.

“It’s not even mandatory anymore. I mean, you don’t have to have but one on there if you don’t want. It’s however many you think you can get away with. So we’re putting the drivers in jeopardy to get track position. It’s not bit anybody yet, but I guarantee you that envelope is going to keep getting pushed until somebody gets hurt.’’

NASCAR fined Stewart $35,000 a day later for his comments and mandated that teams must secure all five lug nuts less than a week later.

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Kevin Harvick SiriusXM show ‘Happy Hours’ back for second season

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Former champion Kevin Harvick’s SiriusXM NASCAR Radio Show “Happy Hours” returns for a second season at 7 p.m. ET Tuesday.

The season’s second show will air from 7-9 p.m. on Feb. 14, which is a Wednesday. After that, the show air from 7-9 p.m. ET on Tuesdays.

“Having my own show on SiriusXM has brought my relationship with the fans to a whole new level,” said Harvick in a statement from SiriusXM NASCAR Radio. “I love that I have two hours to completely share my thoughts on the races and our sport, to really give those fans much more than the quick interview or the emotional sound bite they otherwise see or hear at the track on weekends. ‘Happy Hours’ has created a connection that I had never really experienced before in my career, and I am really excited to get back on the air again this season.”

 “Kevin had a tremendous 2017 both on the track and with SiriusXM NASCAR Radio, qualifying for the Championship 4 and hosting a fantastic radio program,” said Steve Cohen, SiriusXM’s SVP of Sports Programming. “His personality, perspective and charisma are perfect for SiriusXM and we are excited for the second season of ‘Happy Hours.’ ”

SiriusXM NASCAR Radio (channel 90) airs 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, delivering racing talk, news and event coverage of NASCAR’s Cup, Xfinity and Camping World Truck Series.

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Kevin Harvick on Cup drivers in Xfinity, Trucks: ‘Just let them race. Who cares?’

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Kevin Harvick, who once owned an Xfinity team and races in that series, voiced his displeasure Tuesday night with NASCAR’s rule to further limit Cup drivers in Xfintiy and Truck races next year.

“I know there are going to be a lot of people that disagree with me, but it’s hard when you’re trying to build a business and you’re trying to sell sponsorship, you have no tool greater than yourself when you’re in a situation like Brad (Keselowski), myself or Kyle (Busch),’’ Harvick said on his SiriusXM NASCAR Radio show “Happy Hours.’’

“It seems you’re just getting your balls chopped off every time you try to go out and sell sponsorship to try to keep your team funded because of the fact you can’t run enough races, so you can’t tie it to enough things. To me, it’s not the right thing to do.’’

MORE: NASCAR further limits Cup drivers in Xfinity, Trucks 

MORE: Kyle Busch calls new rule “frustrating”

NASCAR announced Tuesday that all Cup drivers are prohibited from competing in the last eight races of the season for the Xfinity and Trucks — the regular-season finale and playoffs. Cup drivers are also prohibited from the Dash 4 Cash races.

Cup drivers with more than five years experience in that series are limited to seven Xfinity races (down from 10 this year) and five Truck races (down from seven this year). Harvick said that Cup drivers were going to be limited to five Xfinity races next year before a compromise of seven was set.

“Just let them race,’’ Harvick said. “Who cares? Why not just let them race. I don’t understand it. That’s what we do. We race cars, we race trucks, we race late models. That’s what we did all our life, we raced. I don’t know why all of a sudden it’s become a problem.’’

Harvick did say that he’s fine with Cup drivers being kept out of the playoffs in both series and the Dash 4 Cash races but they should not be kept out of any other races.

Harvick admits he’s biased toward team ownership because of his history. Harvick and wife DeLana owned Kevin Harvick Inc., which ran in NASCAR from 2002-11. The organization won Camping World Truck Series titles in 2007 and ’09 with Ron Hornaday Jr. and won the owner’s title in 2011. They sold the team after the 2011 season.

Harvick has said previously that allowing Cup drivers in the Xfinity and Truck Series gives young drivers in those series added experience of running against such competitors. He’s also expressed concerns about sponsorship since some sponsors want to be aligned with Cup drivers in those series.

Harvick said Tuesday on “Happy Hours” that Ryan Preece, who won this past weekend at Iowa Speedway for Joe Gibbs Racing, would not have had a chance to drive that car had it not been for JGR using Cup drivers.

“Let me tell you this, Ryan Preece‘s car wouldn’t even been in existence if Denny Hamlin and Erik Jones didn’t have the sponsorship … for that 20 car to be on the race track,” Harvick said on his show.

“I agree with the opportunity (for young drivers) but sometimes you have to balance that opportunity with trying to run a business,’’ Harvick said Tuesday night. “When you’re cutting Kyle’s feet and Brad’s feet out from underneath them when they can’t do what they want to do, then it becomes hard for the teams to do what they need to do.

“I think what you’re going to see happen, when you run out of those options, those Xfinity sponsors are going to start plugging holes on the Cup side and they’re still going to get the Cup driver that they want … because they’re going to put their money on the Cup car.’’

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Kevin Harvick: Most 500-mile races should be shorter

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Kevin Harvick “100 percent” believes 500-mile races like last Sunday’s at Texas Motor Speedway and other non-“crown jewel” races should be shorter.

The Stewart-Haas Racing driver made the comments Tuesday night on his SiriusXM NASCAR Radio show, “Happy Hours.”

Harvick thinks race distances should be adjusted to fit the current landscape of NASCAR racing and fan attention spans.

There are eight 500-mile races on the schedule.

“I think the 500-mile race is a long time,” Harvick said. “I think with the stage racing and the things that we have going now and the attention spans of what people want to watch, I think that there should be the Coke 600, the Daytona 500, the Southern 500, the crown jewel events should have those distances, and I think everything else should be shorter.”

Sunday’s race in Texas was 334 laps and finished in three hours, 24 minutes and 18 seconds. It was the fourth Cup race through the first seven of the year to last longer than three hours and 20 minutes.

Last years’ spring Texas race was 3 hours, 37 minutes and 16 seconds. In 2015, it was three hours, 33 minutes and 57 seconds.

Five of the first seven races this year have been longer time wise than last year, that includes the Daytona 500 (three hours, 29 minutes and 31 seconds) and the 500-mile Atlanta race (three hours, 33 minutes and eight seconds).

Some tracks have shortened races in the last few years. In 2012, Pocono Raceway shortened both its races from 500 to 400 miles. In 2010, Auto Club Speedway did the same and Dover International Speedway went to 400-mile races back in 1997.

Phoenix Raceway briefly extended is spring race from 500 to 600 kilometers in 2010 before reverting to its original length the next year.

But the idea of Texas Motor Speedway shortening its two 500-mile races might be a pipe dream, at least as long as general manager and president Eddie Gossage has a say in the matter.

“I can tell you that the fans do not want shorter races,” Gossage told ESPN in 2015. “Period. End of story.

“The only people that want shorter races are the people that run the races — the teams. I guess I’d like to get work less and still get paid the same.”

In that same ESPN article two years ago Gossage said he hadn’t heard any talk about shortening races, especially from fans. But he had heard of discussions about “format and things like halftimes and quarters.

“… I don’t know how serious anybody is about that.”

Turns out, very.

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