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Goodyear tire info for Charlotte

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NASCAR returns for its second consecutive weekend of racing at Charlotte Motor Speedway with Saturday afternoon’s Alsco 300 Xfinity race and Sunday night’s Coca-Cola 600, the longest race in NASCAR.

According to this week’s Goodyear media release, “Monster Energy NASCAR Cup teams will be running the same tire set-up for the Coca-Cola 600 that they ran during All-Star weekend at Charlotte. Based on the racing last weekend, tires will be a factor. First, All-Star teams that took four tires overcame the track position of those that did not. Second, with 12 race sets of tires for NASCAR’s longest race, the pit crews will play a big part in a team’s success, and those that master all those four-tire pit stops will help their car gain valuable spots on pit road.”

Added Greg Stucker, Goodyear director of racing, “The Coca-Cola 600 is the longest race on the schedule and it is held on one of the more temperature sensitive tracks upon which we compete, as the race starts in daylight and ends at night. We saw that fresh tires mattered last weekend during the All-Star race. Four tire pit stops should be the order of the day and teams have 12 sets of tires for the 400-lap race, so the team aspect of the sport will be on full display as the pit crews will be kept busy all night.”

According to the Goodyear media release, "Goodyear will debut a special “Honor and Remember” sidewall at Charlotte: Since 2010, for one weekend per NASCAR season, Goodyear has changed the branding on the sidewall of its racing tires in a show of support for the United States military and fallen heroes. This being the 10th year of that program, the official tire supplier to NASCAR’s top three series will work with a new organization and replace the standard “Eagle” with “Honor and Remember” for both the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup and NASCAR Xfinity Series races.

"Honor and Remember is a national organization based out of Virginia that has a mission to “perpetually recognize the sacrifice of America’s military fallen service members and their families,” according to its website. The organization recognizes fallen military personnel from all wars or conflicts, and with those from all branches of service. They do so primarily by dedicating the specially designed Honor and Remember flag, which is intended to fly continuously as a tangible and visible reminder to all Americans of the lives lost in defense of our national freedoms."

NOTES – Cup cars on same tire set-up as All-Star weekend: Teams in both the NASCAR Cup and Xfinity Series will run the same tire set-up at Charlotte this week . . . this is the same combination of left- and right-side tires that Cup teams ran during All-Star weekend last week . . . for the Cup cars, this is the same right-side tire code they ran in last year’s Coca-Cola 600 and the same left-side tire they have run the last three weeks – Dover, Kansas and All-Star . . . for the Xfinity cars, this is the same right-side tire they ran on the Charlotte oval in 2018, combined with their 2019 Dover left-side tire . . . compared to what was run at Charlotte last year, this left-side features a construction update to align it with what is run at other speedways . . . this tire set-up came out of a test on the 2019 rules package that was run at Charlotte last October . . . teams (drivers) participating in that test were Richard Childress Racing (Daniel Hemric), Joe Gibbs Racing (Erik Jones), Hendrick Motorsports (William Byron) and Stewart-Haas Racing (Aric Almirola) . . . as on all NASCAR ovals greater than one mile in length, teams are required to run inner liners in all four tire positions at Charlotte . . . air pressure in those inner liners should be 12-25 psi greater than that of the outer tire.

Here’s the tire info for this weekend’s races:

Tire: Goodyear “Honor and Remember” Speedway Radials for both Cup and Xfinity

Set limits: Cup: 3 sets for practice, 1 set for qualifying and 12 sets for the race; Xfinity: 7 sets for the event

Tire Codes: Left-side -- D-4868; Right-side – D-4736

Tire Circumference: Left-side -- 2,227 mm (87.68 in.); Right-side -- 2,251 mm (88.62 in.)

Minimum Recommended Inflation: Left Front -- 19 psi; Left Rear -- 19 psi; Right Front -- 52 psi; Right Rear -- 50 psi

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Goodyear tire info for All-Star Race weekend at Charlotte

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NASCAR’s All-Star Race weekend at Charlotte Motor Speedway will feature three races in two nights: Friday’s North Carolina Education Lottery 200 NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series race, as well as Saturday’s Monster Energy Open and the marquee event, the 35th NASCAR All-Star Race.

Greg Stucker, Goodyear director of racing, noted: “The All-Star race is always a big night for the sport of NASCAR. Not only do the short segments lead to a sense of urgency with teams deciding on different pit strategies, but this year we have the added excitement of testing out some new (aerodynamic) elements that we may very well see incorporated into the Cup cars in the future.

The All-Star weekend is a great chance to try some of these things and get a real world look at how they perform on the track in race conditions. We will run the same tire set-up for both weeks of Charlotte, so the next two weeks will provide good data points for what is working. All that with the backdrop of $1 million to the race winner will make for an exciting night of racing.”

NOTES: Cup: while teams in both the NASCAR Cup and Gander Outdoors Truck Series will run the same right-side tire code at Charlotte this weekend, each series will run its own left-side code. For the Cup cars, this is the same right-side tire code they ran at Charlotte in 2018. This is the left-side tire the Cup cars ran at both Dover and Kansas over the past two weeks. Compared to what was run at Charlotte last year, it features a construction update to what is run at other speedways. This tire set-up came out of a test on the 2019 rules package that was run at Charlotte last October. Teams (drivers) participating in that test were Richard Childress Racing (Daniel Hemric), Joe Gibbs Racing (Erik Jones), Hendrick Motorsports (William Byron) and Stewart-Haas Racing (Aric Almirola).

Trucks: While teams in both the Gander Outdoors Truck Series and Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series will run the same right-side tire code at Charlotte this weekend, each series will run its own left-side code . . . for Truck teams, these are two tire codes they have not run at Charlotte in the past . . . compared to Charlotte 2018, this left-side tire features a construction update, while this right-side tire aligns the Trucks with the Cup cars and features a compound change for more grip.

Both series: As on all NASCAR ovals greater than one mile in length, teams are required to run inner liners in all four tire positions at Charlotte. Air pressure in those inner liners should be 12-25 psi greater than that of the outer tire.

Here’s the Goodyear tire info for all three races this weekend, the Gander Outdoors Truck Series race, the Monster Energy Open and the NASCAR All-Star Race:

Tire: Goodyear Eagle Speedway Radials

Set limits: Open: 3 sets for practice and qualifying and 3 sets for the Open (2 race sets plus qualifying set); All-Star race: 5 sets for practice and qualifying and 4 sets for the race; (Open teams that transfer are allowed 4 sets for the All-Star race). Trucks: 6 sets for the event.

Tire Codes: Cup: Left-side -- D-4868; Right-side – D-4736. Trucks: Left-side -- D-4880; Right-side – D-4736.

Tire Circumference: Cup: Left-side -- 2,227 mm (87.68 in.); Right-side -- 2,251 mm (88.62 in.). Trucks: Left-side -- 2,227 mm (87.68 in.); Right-side -- 2,251 mm (88.62 in.).

Minimum Recommended Inflation: Cup: Left Front -- 19 psi; Left Rear -- 19 psi; Right Front -- 52 psi; Right Rear -- 50 psi. Trucks: Left Front -- 21 psi; Left Rear -- 19 psi; Right Front -- 52 psi; Right Rear -- 50 psi.

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Goodyear tire info for Kansas Speedway

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NASCAR makes its first visit of the season to Kansas Speedway this weekend for a pair of races that will be under the lights: Friday night’s Truck Series race and Saturday night’s Cup event.

According to a Goodyear media release: “The track surface at Kansas Speedway has quietly weathered over the past several years, evidenced by the fact that in both of their races in 2018, Monster Energy NASCAR Cup teams experienced two seconds of tire fall-off over the course of a full fuel run. Having said that, the 2019 aerodynamic package with higher downforce has resulted in slightly less tire fall off this season, as the cars slide less in the corners. Still, four-tire stops should be the norm in the race, making the pit crews a critical part of a team’s success.

Added Greg Stucker, Goodyear’s director of racing: “The right-side tire we are running at Kansas is the same one the Cup cars ran at Las Vegas and Texas earlier this season, and it is formulated to wear more. After its repave in 2012, the track surface at Kansas has finally felt the effects of the weather and has started to age and generate more fall off. We expect this tire combination to rubber-in the track from bottom to top, creating multiple racing grooves along the way.”

NOTES: While teams in both the NASCAR Cup and Gander Outdoors Truck Series will run the same right-side tire code at Kansas this weekend, each series will run its own left-side code. For the Cup cars, this is the same left-side tire code they ran at Dover last weekend, while this right-side tire code was run at both Las Vegas and Texas earlier this season, compared to what was run at Kansas last year. Both of these tires feature construction updates that bring them into line with what is run at other tracks, while this right-side moves teams to a single tread tire vs. a multi-zone tread.

Trucks: This is the first time teams have run this left-side tire code. Compared to what the Trucks ran at Kansas in 2018, this left-side code features a construction update to align with other speedways and a compound change to give the Trucks more grip. Trucks ran this right-side tire code at Texas in March. It features a construction update and moves the trucks from a multi-zone tread to a single tread tire vs. Kansas 2018.

Both series: As on all NASCAR ovals greater than one mile in length, teams are required to run inner liners in all four tire positions at Kansas. Air pressure in those inner liners should be 12-25 psi greater than that of the outer tire.

Here’s the tire info for this weekend’s races:

Tire: Goodyear Eagle Speedway Radials.

Set limits: Cup – 3 sets for practice, 1 set for qualifying and 9 sets for the race (8 race sets plus 1 set transferred from qualifying or practice). Trucks – 6 sets for the event.

Tire Codes: Cup – Left-side -- D-4868; Right-side – D-4796. Trucks – Left-side – D-4880; Right-side – D-4796

Tire Circumference: Cup – Left-side -- 2,227 mm (87.68 in.); Right-side -- 2,251 mm (88.62 in.). Trucks – Left-side -- 2,227 mm (87.68 in.); Right-side -- 2,252 mm (88.66 in.).

Minimum Recommended Inflation: Cup – Left Front -- 22 psi; Left Rear -- 22 psi; Right Front -- 52 psi; Right Rear -- 50 psi. Trucks – Left Front -- 24 psi; Left Rear -- 22 psi; Right Front -- 52 psi; Right Rear -- 50 psi.

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Goodyear tire info for Talladega Superspeedway

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NASCAR makes its first visit of the season to Talladega Superspeedway this weekend, and with it will come a new left side tire in both Cup and Xfinity. Right side tires remain the same from those used in both Cup races and the sole Xfinity race last season at Talladega.

The new tire set-up was recommended for Talladega after a tire test at Daytona on Feb. 18-19 with Alex Bowman, Kyle Larson and Daniel Hemric. As on all NASCAR ovals greater than 1 mile in length, teams are required to run inner liners in all four tires at Talladega. Air pressure in those inner liners should be between 12 and 25 psi greater than that of the outer tire.

Since its repave in 2010, Talladega has used a different tire than at Daytona.

According to a Goodyear media release, “Talladega exhibits some wear characteristics, though teams are still able to employ some tire strategy – two-tire and fuel-only stops – that leads to chances to trade fresh rubber for track position. Because it is possible to pit at Talladega and not lose a lap to the race leaders, that opens up strategy plays for teams outside the top 10 to short pit and gain track position when the rest of the field pits at the end of a stage.”

Added Greg Stucker, Goodyear’s director of racing, While we actually see some tire wear at Talladega, it still leaves room for some team and pit strategy. When to pit, with whom and how many tires to take all come into the equation for teams to consider this weekend. And adding in a rules package that Cup teams will be running for the first time, should make for some interesting racing.”

Here’s the tire info for this weekend’s races:

Tire: Goodyear Eagle Superspeedway Radials.

Set limits: Cup: 2 sets for practice, 1 set for qualifying and 7 sets for the race (6 race sets plus 1 set transferred from qualifying or practice). Xfinity: 4 sets for the event.

Tire Codes: Cup: Left-side — D-4886; Right-side – D-4752. Xfinity: Left-side — D-4596; Right-side – D-4752.

Tire Circumference: Cup: Left-side — 2,236 mm (88.03 in.); Right-side — 2,249 mm (88.54 in.) Xfinity: Left-side — 2,233 mm (87.91 in.); Right-side — 2,249 mm (88.54 in.).

Minimum Recommended Inflation: Cup: Left Front — 29 psi; Left Rear – 29 psi; Right Front — 50 psi; Right Rear — 48 psi. Xfinity: Left Front — 29 psi; Left Rear – 29 psi; Right Front — 50 psi; Right Rear — 48 psi.

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Tony Stewart on Cup qualifying, team ownership and sprint car racing

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RICHMOND, Va. — Tony Stewart is many things from being a three-time Cup champion to a team owner, NASCAR Hall of Fame nominee and a sprint car driver, but for all the things Stewart has done and can do in a car he’s known as much for something else.

His honesty and bluntness. 

When Stewart talks about the issues with Cup qualifying, he’s frank in saying of NASCAR: “They make one bad decision and then they compound it by having to make three more bad decisions to try to make up for the first bad decision they made.”

While he’s been a critic of NASCAR, Stewart also isn’t afraid to applaud series officials but admits what NASCAR does things right it often gets overlooked.

“You make one bad decision and it takes 10 good decision to overcome that one,” he said.

Stewart discussed a variety of topics this weekend at Richmond Raceway. Here’s what he said:

Q: You’ve been outspoken about young drivers with money coming into the sport, but hasn’t that always been the case in racing? Haven’t some people missed moving up because they didn’t have the look or the money?

Tony Stewart: I didn’t have the right look. I still don’t have the right look. I never had paid a dime. … That whole Generational Next thing, you look at the criteria for that, is that how we really want to set our fields? Is that how we want to do this? I think they’ve got to relook at how they do it. I honestly think that’s part of why we’re losing so many people. I heard people (Thursday night) at the dirt races, say ‘I like coming here because there’s not as many rules.’ That’s literally what people were saying. It was that simple to them. It’s hard to argue with that.

I understand why we have the rules we have. The fans are saying there are too many rules. If they can’t follow along, how are they going to follow along?

Q: Too many rules. Is that the issue with Cup qualifying?

Stewart: You already line the cars up on pit road in an organized manner. You have a maximum speed. Have a minimum speed (on pit road). Once that car pulls out of its spot, it has to keep going, plain and simple. You can go anywhere in that speed range you want but once you take off, you’ve got to keep going. How much more simple is it than that?

All NASCAR has to do at that point is look at the screen to make sure you’re not going too fast or too slow. They’re already doing the too fast part, so how hard is it to just add the too slow part? If you go too slow, your lap is not allowed. If you go too fast, your lap is not allowed. It’s pretty damn simple I think. But they keep adding things that make them have to make judgment calls. Why do you constantly keep putting yourself in position to have to make a ball-and-strike call? Put it in the drivers’ and crew chiefs’ and spotters’ hands, not your hands.

Quit making it about it you. Make them have to make the decision. They make one bad decision and then they compound it by having to make three more bad decisions to try to make up for the first bad decision they made.

They just … somebody needs to just grab them by the collar and say, ‘Stop, take a breath and sit down and start over and think about this and rework it.’ Their head is 6 inches forward of their feet and they can’t get their feet to keep catching up to what their heads are doing all the time.”

Q: Is NASCAR doing anything well?

Stewart: There’s a ton of things they’re doing well. It’s like a negative comment takes 10 positive comments to overcome one negative comment. You make one bad decision and it takes 10 good decision to overcome that one. There’s a ton of things they’re doing right. There’s a ton of things they’re working on for the future that they’re also doing things right. There’s so much low-hanging fruit that they could fix.

Q: Such as?

Stewart: There’s a whole list. I’m not going to get through the list. I’ve got to make sure I get my cars through tech.

Q: Car owners talk about containing costs but if I’m a car owner and I have to decide between a driver with money and one maybe more talented but doesn’t have the money, I’ll likely take the one with money.

Stewart: That’s my whole point. That’s the direction our sport is going. That’s screwed up. If that’s where we’re going, we’re in bad shape.

Q: Do you feel like things are being done to help owners contain costs?

Stewart: There’s a lot of things that they’re working on to try to do that. It’s a constant battle, you’re constantly battling technology. Technology is the biggest root of the problem, but you can’t stop technology. You look at these cars, they’ve kept the simple basic car, the basics of the car hasn’t changed for how many years. Things that have changed are safety improvements, which are definitely justified and appreciated. It’s not a linear progression with technology, … it’s virtually impossible for NASCAR and Goodyear and everybody involved, it’s hard for them to get in front of it because you don’t know what’s coming next. … It’s hard to get your arms around all of it. They do a really good job of trying to contain it, trying to get in front of it, but it’s a hard process.

Q: How do you feel Stewart-Haas Racing is doing this year?

Stewart: We’ve been solid. There’s just a couple of things missing that we need to be where we want to be. To come out with a new car this year and be this close out of the box, I feel like we’re pretty happy about that. Obviously, we set our standards pretty high on what we expect. We’re obviously thrashing at the shop to find what is going to make these cars happy and it’s just no different than what happened last year with those guys. We’re working on it. Like I say, it’s a constant evolution. What you did last year isn’t good enough, you’ve got to push it forward and keep fighting. New trick of the week.

Q: How is your sprint car racing going?

Stewart: Better actually. We should have run fourth (Thursday) not sixth. Had a motor problem at the end and got paying attention to the oil pressure gauge, which was on zero instead of watching where I was going. We’re running a lot better. Before last weekend, we had a 4.0 average I think for the 15 races we had run. I’m not sure with a 13th and a sixth how that changes it, but we’re running a lot better and it’s because we’re racing a lot.

You’re running all the time and that’s the only way you’re going to get better with these guys. I’ve actually ran more than a lot of the guys out there. That’s the only way you’re going to get better is running as many shows as they run. They’re good teams and they’re on their game already, so if you’re going to catch up, physically you’re going to have to run that many races to catch up.