Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series

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How Jordan Anderson discovered his race hauler is a ‘time capsule’

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If not for the COVID-19 pandemic that’s brought NASCAR and much of the country to a stop, it might have taken Jordan Anderson a while to discover his race team’s hauler was a “time capsule.”

When you’re not expecting to race until at least May, there’s not too much you can do around your race shop.

What you can do is clean your hauler, which would be a “bottom of the totem pole” chore for his Truck Series team in more normal times.

That’s what Anderson was doing today when he learned that the hauler his team has used since 2019 once pulled into the Cup Series garage … 18 years ago.

“Underneath the seat cushions it had ‘Hooters Racing / No. 11’ on it. …. handwritten in sharpie,” Anderson told NBC Sports.

The No. 11 and Hooters were a combo associated with Cup Series driver Brett Bodine from 2002-03 when Bodine owned his own team.

As for the inscribed cushion?

“Somebody pointed this out on Twitter that’s a common thing that Featherlite did when they manufactured these haulers,” Anderson said. “All the seats were made in a common area and the way they marked what hauler they were going in was somebody would just take a sharpie on the bottom board of the cushions and write what hauler it was going in.”

There were more relics from the early 2000s found underneath the hauler’s drawers.

“We found a couple of … setup sheets and stuff like that that had Brett Bodine, the 11 logo on it,” Anderson said. “Then we found one note that I think had practice times from like Phoenix in 2002 in there.”

Anderson, who finished second in the season-opening race at Daytona for his first career top five, purchased the hauler from Premium Motorsports at the end of the 2018 season. Before Premium, it was owned by Stewart Friesen when he began competing in the Truck Series in 2017. Before that, it hauled Tommy Baldwin Racing’s No. 7 Cup car driven by Alex Bowman in 2015.

Using equipment that’s survived through multiple racing generations is not a new experience for Anderson’s self-owned team.

“Honestly, it’s been my entire career,” said Jordan, who currently owns chassis once used by GMS Racing. “With us being a smaller team, we don’t actually manufacturer the chassis. We may do body work, things like that. Most chassis and parts that we buy come from smaller teams and there’s a lot of people that are here in Mooresville that sell used parts.”

Jordan said he has brake calipers that are engraved with “KHI,” the initials for Kevin Harvick Inc., the Truck and Xfinity Series team Harvick operated that closed in 2011.

“It’s pretty crazy to go back and find some of the parts and pieces that we got that have been recycled from bigger teams,” Anderson said. “The fact that stuff gets recycled and reused is how teams like myself stay alive. Because for us to go out and buy all brand new stuff, you’d run out of money pretty quickly.”

As for his hauler, Anderson views its journey through the auto racing community as having come “full circle.”

“That hauler started its life with Brett Bodine, but he owned his team back then and now (it’s) with me owning our team in the Truck Series,” Anderson said. “Most stuff in racing has got a pretty long story. You don’t often get too fortunate to find stuff like what we found today to be able to trace it all the way back.”

Amid iRacing spotlight, Timmy Hill ‘can’t stop’ working on real race team

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Exactly one year ago today, Timmy Hill debuted his own Gander RV & Outdoors Truck Series team at Martinsville Speedway.

After competing in NASCAR at a national level since the day after he turned 18 in 2011, the Maryland native sought a little more “certainty” and  “exposure” for a career that’s been defined by racing underfunded equipment.

“Being a NASCAR owner was never a big dream of mine to do,” Hill told NBC Sports on Monday. “I just wanted to be a driver, I want to be the man who drives the cars. But this sport, there’s no certainty, at least for me and my career, there hasn’t been. I’ve been fortunate enough to where I’ve driven for other family teams.”

Added Hill: “This is a better way to control your own destiny by just doing it yourself.”

One year after his No. 56 Chevrolet finished 21st at Martinsville, Hill’s getting the most exposure of his career following a race.

But nobody could have predicted it would come as a result of a nationally televised iRacing event.

On Monday, the 27-year-old driver was scheduled for seven interviews with at least three more awaiting on Tuesday. All because he finished third in Sunday’s NASCAR Pro Invitational iRacing Series exhibition race, essentially the only brand new sporting event in the last week amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Held on a digital Homestead-Miami Speedway, Hill, who has been competing on iRacing for just over a decade, took on NASCAR All-Stars Denny Hamlin, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Jimmie Johnson and others.

While some of the more well known drivers participated via expensive and fancy iRacing “rigs,” Hill’s setup reflected how he’s competed against powerhouse teams in the real world.

He sat at a desk he estimates he bought for $75 on Black Friday one year, the same desk he does his team’s business at. and uses a steering wheel he bought 12 years ago for $300.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. races Timmy Hill (66) during the eNASCAR iRacing Pro Invitational Series on a virtual Homestead-Miami Speedway. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

The 100-lap race started sloppy with multiple wrecks before it calmed down for a long green-flag run at the end, which saw Hamlin win over Earnhardt, Hill, Chase Briscoe and Garrett Smithley.

“I think some of these guys took for granted how much work and effort you still have put in to be competitive,” Hill said. “I could tell you just from watching (practice) what these guys would do … Bobby Labonte, I saw he ran several hundred laps of practice just in one day. Denny and different ones, they took it seriously and I really appreciate that, because I think the guys who did take it seriously, it really showed and they put on a good race.

“The guys who didn’t take it seriously, took it for granted and thought it would be easy. I think they were kind of surprised and shocked and taken off guard … You could see the different levels of experience in yesterday’s race … I think going forward to next weekend’s race, I think these guys will probably be practicing quite a bit more.”

This wasn’t the first time this year Hill has finished in the top five of a major racing event.

In February, Hill placed third in the Xfinity Series season-opener at Daytona, earning his second top five across 317 NASCAR national series starts.

“I think it’s (Daytona) probably my favorite weekend I’ve ever had in racing,” said Hill, who also qualified for his first Daytona 500. But even with the “big hype” around that weekend, Hill said “I’ve gotten more media requests, interview requests from (Sunday’s) race than for anything else I’ve ever done.

“It’s very new. With everything that’s new, everybody would love to know more about it.”

The invitational series will continue this weekend on a digital Texas Motor Speedway, but on Monday Hill was hard at work prepping his Truck Series team for a return to the real track.

Hill, who lives in High Point, North Carolina, drove roughly 60 miles to Mooresville to get parts for his trucks, which he hopes he’ll get to run in 10 races this season while the truck is fielded full-time.

Due in part to the COVID-19 pandemic, Hill’s gotten the exposure he was seeking in creating the team, but like the rest of the sport, there’s not much certainty about what comes next.

With him is his lone employee, crew chief Greg Ely.

“We can’t stop,” Hill said. “Between him and I, everything that you see that comes to the race track … it’s just done between he and I. I don’t think most people realize that. I’m very hands on … Even though we’re not racing we’re preparing for what could be a very busy summer depending on how things shake out. When that gets here it’s going to be very busy for us, it’s going to be very tough to do.

“So we’re trying to get as far ahead as possible. We basically have two mile-and-a-half trucks done, ready to go. Got one short track truck that’s done and ready to go. I don’t know what our next race is going to be, what style of race track, we haven’t heard yet. We don’t have time to figure that out once the season gets here, we have to be prepared as possible now to be able to be ready to go.”

NASCAR weekend schedule at Atlanta

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With the three-race West Coast swing now in its rearview mirror, NASCAR moves on to another three-race swing with a trio of consecutive races on 1.5-mile tracks, starting with this weekend’s slate of races at Atlanta Motor Speedway.

All three national series will be in action at the Hampton, Georgia track, with the Truck and Xfinity Series racing Saturday, followed by the Cup race Sunday.

For Friday, wunderground.com forecasts a high of 68 degrees and a 48% chance of rain.

Saturday’s forecast calls for cloudy skies with a high of 72 degrees and a 14% chance of rain.

On Sunday, the forecast calls for a high of 71 degrees and 36% chance of rain at the time scheduled for the green flag to wave.

Here’s the full weekend schedule with TV and radio info:

(All times are Eastern)

Friday, March 13

11 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. – Truck garage open

11:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. – Xfinity garage open

12:30 – 9 p.m. – Cup garage open

1:35 – 2:25 p.m. – Truck practice (no TV)

2:35 – 3:25 p.m. – Xfinity practice (FS1)

3:35 – 4:25 p.m. – Cup practice (FS1)

4:32 – 4:57 p.m. – Final Truck practice (FS1)

5:02 – 5:27 p.m. – Final Xfinity practice (FS1)

5:35 – 6:25 p.m. – Final Cup practice (FS1)

Saturday, March 14

7:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. – Cup garage open

7:30 a.m. – Xfinity garage open

8:30 a.m. – Truck garage open

10:05 a.m. – Truck qualifying impound (single vehicle/one lap all positions) (FS1)

11:05 a.m. – Xfinity qualifying impound (single vehicle/one lap all positions) (FS1)

12 p.m. – Truck driver/crew chief meeting

12:05 p.m. – Cup qualifying impound (single vehicle/one lap all positions) (FS1, Performance Racing Network)

12:45 p.m. – Xfinity driver/crew chief meeting

1 p.m. – Truck driver introductions

1:30 p.m. – Truck race (Stages 30/60/130 laps = 200.02 miles) (FS1, Motor Racing Network, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio)

3:30 p.m. – Xfinity driver introductions

4 p.m. – Xfinity race (Stages 40/80/163 laps = 251.02 miles) (FS1, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio)

Sunday, March 15

10 a.m. – Cup garage open

12 p.m. – Cup driver/crew chief meeting

1:20 p.m. – Cup driver introductions

2 p.m. – Cup race (Stages 105/210/325 laps = 500.5 miles) (Fox, PRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio)

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Preliminary entry lists for NASCAR at Atlanta

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After three weekends on the West Coast, NASCAR returns to the Southeast this weekend to race at Atlanta Motor Speedway.

All three national series will be in action, with the Gander RV & Outdoors Series racing for the first time since Las Vegas.

Here are the preliminary entry lists for all three series.

Cup – Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (2 p.m. ET Sunday on Fox)

Thirty-eight cars are entered in the race.

Ross Chastain is entered in his fourth race in Roush Fenway Racing’s No. 6 Ford as Ryan Newman continues to recover from a head injury.

Brad Keselowski won this race last year over Martin Truex Jr. and Kurt Busch.

Click here for the entry list.

Xfinity – EchoPark 250 (4 p.m. ET Saturday on FS1)

Thirty-six cars are entered for the race.

Myatt Snider is entered in Richard Childress Racing’s No. 21 Chevrolet.

Jeffrey Earnhardt is entered in JD Motorsports’ No. 15 Chevrolet for his first start of the year.

Christopher Bell won this race last year over Cole Custer and Justin Allgaier.

Click here for the entry list.

Trucks – Vet Tix Camping World 200 (1:30 p.m. ET Saturday on FS1)

It’s officially bounty week in Truck Series.

Among the 38 trucks entered into the event (only 32 will qualify for it) are three full-time Cup Series drivers who will attempt to earn the $100,000 bounty placed against Kyle Busch by Kevin Harvick and Marcus Lemonis, the CEO of the series sponsor.

The trio of bounty hunters include:

Chase Elliott, who is entered in GMS Racing’s No. 24 Chevrolet.

John Hunter Nemechek, entered in NEMCO Motorsports’ No. 8 Chevrolet

Brennan Poole, entered in On Point Motorsports’ No. 29 Toyota.

If any of the drivers are able to finish ahead of Busch in the race, he will claim the bounty. If none of them do, Kyle Larson and Erik Jones will get a shot a Busch and the $100,000 next weekend at Homestead-Miami Speedway.

Also entered in the race is Ryan Truex in Niece Motorsports’ No. 40 Chevrolet.

Busch won this race last year over Johnny Sauter and Grant Enfinger.

Click here for the entry list.

Chandler Smith set for eight Truck Series races with Kyle Busch Motorsports

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Chandler Smith will run an eight-race schedule in the Truck Series this year for Kyle Busch Motorsports, the team announced Tuesday.

Smith, 17, will begin his schedule in the No. 51 Toyota with the first two races in the Triple Truck Challenge, at Richmond Raceway (April 18) and Dover International Speedway (May 1).

Smith’s remaining schedule is Michigan International Speedway (Aug. 8) and then five of the seven playoff races: World Wide Technology Raceway at Gateway (Aug. 21), Bristol Motor Speedway (Sept. 17), Las Vegas Motor Speedway (Sept. 25), Talladega Superspeedway (Oct. 3) and Phoenix Raceway (Nov. 6).

Smith made four starts for KBM last year, finishing in the top 10 in each one and earning three top fives.