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Friday 5: The tale of two comments and one fine

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What’s the difference between these comments?

Denny Hamlin after the March 3, 2013, Phoenix race: “I don’t want to be the pessimist, but it did not race as good as our generation five cars. This is more like what the generation five was at the beginning. The teams hadn’t figured out how to get the aero balance right. Right now, you just run single-file and you cannot get around the guy in front of you. You would have placed me in 20th-place with 30 (laps) to go, I would have stayed there — I wouldn’t have moved up. It’s just one of those things where track position is everything.”

Kyle Busch after Monday’s race at Dover on the package for the cars: “It’s terrible. All I can do is bitch about it and fall on deaf ears and we’ll come back with the same thing in the fall.”

NASCAR fined Hamlin $25,000 for his comments.

NASCAR explained the reason for the fine by stating: “Denny Hamlin made some disparaging remarks about the on-track racing that had taken place that afternoon. While NASCAR gives its competitors ample leeway in voicing their opinions when it comes to a wide range of aspects about the sport, the sanctioning body will not tolerate publicly made comments by its drivers that denigrate the racing product.”

Six years later, NASCAR said this week that it would not fine Busch for his comments after the Dover race. Busch said this week that he was not surprised NASCAR decided against fining him for his comments because “I’m not sure I said anything wrong.”

But don’t try to dissect the comments. That’s not the place to look in examining why one driver was fined and another was not.

NASCAR’s reaction to Busch’s comments shows a calmer approach. That’s a difference between Jim France, who is now the sport’s CEO, and Brian France, who was the CEO when Hamlin was fined.

Brian France often used a simple example to explain his reasoning for fining drivers for comments, saying in November 2011: “If I own a restaurant and I say you know what, the food in my restaurant is not very good, we’re not going to accept it. It’s as simple as that.”

With that as a key component, NASCAR issued secret fines to Hamlin, Ryan Newman and Brad Keselowski for comments and actions.

When public pressure grew for NASCAR to do away with secret fines, Brian France said in January 2012 that the sanctioning body would still react to driver comments.

“If you challenge the integrity of the sport, we’re going to deal with that,” Brian France said then. “You know, we have to deal with that. And I think what’s really interesting is I can’t tell you how many owners or drivers come up to me and say thanks for doing that because some of these comments were irresponsible and unhelpful to growing the sport.”

If drivers can’t pass, they’re going to be frustrated. Some drivers noted how winner Martin Truex Jr. had the best car at Dover but it took him 240 laps to get to the front.

Truex took the lead for good with 53 laps to go. The same car that struggled in traffic — “It was definitely really hard to pass,” he said — then drove away from the field, winning by 9.5 seconds.

While the package has improved the racing at some tracks, it’s not perfect every place. The key is making changes for tracks where the package isn’t as effective.

With car owners facing additional costs with the Gen 7 car’s projected debut in 2021, they likely will be hesitant to be in favor of any expensive midseason changes. It’s 21 months until February 2021. With many details to be worked out with the new car, the question is what can NASCAR do to allow drivers to show more of their skill? If NASCAR can’t find a solution, how much longer will they allow drivers to speak up about the package?

2. Is time running out for NASCAR to go to Nashville in 2021?

In December, Formosa Productions, which promotes races at Fairgrounds Speedway in Nashville, Tennessee, and Bristol Motor Speedway reached an agreement to “explore bringing major NASCAR racing events” back to the .596-mile track.

Nearly six months later, work remains.

An issue is getting an agreement done with the city by next spring when NASCAR is expected to announce the 2021 schedules. NASCAR announced the 2020 Xfinity and Gander Truck Series schedules April 4, 2019. If NASCAR aims for a similar target date, that would leave 11 months to get a deal complete.

If more time was needed, NASCAR might be able to delay the 2021 Xfinity and Truck schedules. The 2019 schedules for both series were not released until June 13, 2018. Either way, time is ticking.

“Days, weeks and months go by quickly when you’re not really paying attention to it,” Marcus Smith, president and chief executive officer of Speedway Motorsports, said. “However, it’s very possible things can get put on the right track and move along very swiftly and that’s certainly our interest.”

He says conversations are ongoing.

I think the most important part is we’ve got a strong interest and it seems like in general there is a big interest in the people we’re talking with,” Smith said.

A few issues facing an effort to get on the 2021 schedule:

Nashville elections, including for mayor, are Aug. 12. There are multiple candidates for mayor and should a runoff election be needed, it would be held Sept. 12.

Smith notes that Fairgrounds Speedway “needs some TLC.” So far a financing plan has not been finalized.

Also, the Metro Board of Fair Commissioners raised issues in its April meeting about SMI’s involvement.

While the Tennessean had reported that SMI/Bristol Motor Speedway officials have met with Mayor David Briley and his administration, the Fair Board — which oversees the track — has not had any contact.

“I think there has sort of been a transparency problem here,” said fair board member Jason Bergeron at the April meeting. “It’s been eight months and we haven’t heard any details. … It’s a little frustrating. We have no concrete proposal and there’s been no real engagement with the community.”

He later said: “I think SMI needs to bring a real proposal to the table.”

The agenda for the May 14 Fair Commission Board meeting includes a “presentation by Speedway Motorsports Inc.”

3. A new test

Cup teams return to a 1.5-mile speedway this weekend for the first time in more than a month.

Denny Hamlin won at Texas on March 31 in the most recent race at a 1.5-mile speedway. That race also saw Hendrick Motorsports lead 110 of 334 laps between Jimmie Johnson (60 laps led), Chase Elliott (35) and William Byron (15). Johnson finished fifth, Byron sixth and Elliott 13th.

Stewart-Haas Racing, which is winless this year after winning a series-high 12 races last year, placed all four of its cars in the top 10 at Texas: Clint Bowyer was second, Daniel Suarez placed third, Aric Almirola was seventh and Kevin Harvick finished eighth.

Almirola is excited to see where his team stands this weekend at Kansas Speedway.

“We’ve built new race cars going to Kansas,” Almirola said. “We built new race cars going to Texas, which I thought were in the game. We were competitive, we led some laps and challenged to lead the race at the end.

“We were in the right direction with our race cars and then we’ve taken another step in going to Kansas. Just continuing to evolve our mile-and-a-half program. Having a month off has really allowed us to kind of take as step back, go through lot of data, look at a lot of different things and build these race cars.”

4. Record streak

No, we’re not talking about Kyle Busch tying Morgan Shepherd for the most consecutive top-10 finishes in a row at 11, but what Ross Chastain has done this year.

Ross Chastain has competed in every Cup, Xfinity and Truck race this season. Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

Chastain has started every Cup, Xfinity and Gander Outdoors Truck Series race. That’s 27 consecutive races and it will grow this weekend with Chastain entered in both the Truck and Cup races at Kansas Speedway.

Chastain is one of three drivers to have started more than 16 consecutive races in Cup, Xfinity and Trucks to start the season. Chastain ranks No. 1 on the list.

Kyle Busch is next. Busch started the first 22 races in the 2008 season and started the first 20 races in the 2009 season. Rick Mast started the first 16 races in the 1989 season.

5. Looks familiar

In 2017, Martin Truex Jr. had two wins, three top-five finishes, seven top-10 finishes, led 536 laps and had an average finish of 10.5 after 11 races.

This year, Truex has scored two wins, four top-five finishes, seven top-10 finishes, led 343 laps and has an average finish of 10.3 after 11 races.

Truex went on to win the title in 2017. While it’s too early to forecast anything like that this year, his start in his first season at Joe Gibbs Racing should not go unnoticed, especially heading to Kansas. He has four consecutive top-five finishes there. He won both races there in 2017, finished runner-up in the May 2018 race and placed fifth in last year’s playoff race.

Nashville will be new home of NASCAR Cup Awards Ceremony

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After a 10-year run in Las Vegas, the NASCAR Cup Awards Ceremony is moving to the city nicknamed “Nash Vegas.”

NASCAR announced Wednesday that its 2019 postseason awards gala will be in Nashville, Tennessee. The show will be held Thursday, Dec. 5, at the Music City Center in downtown Nashville and televised on NBCSN.

“This year, we set a course to look at everything we do through a different lens, including how we celebrate the champions of our sport,” NASCAR President Steve Phelps told NASCAR.com. “Nashville’s energy, vibrant entertainment scene, and deep-rooted lineage in motorsports informed our decision and we believe our fans and industry will embrace the move to the Music City.”

The postseason awards had been held in Las Vegas since 2009. That followed a 28-year run in New York at the Waldorf-Astoria, host of the first awards ceremony for Cup in 1981.

NASCAR’s Xfinity and Gander Outdoors Truck Series awards ceremonies will remain in North Carolina at the Charlotte Convention Center. Those events will be held Friday, Nov. 22 (on the weekend between NASCAR’s season finale in Miami and Thanksgiving).

Other Champion’s Week events will be announced at a later date, but NASCAR is touting that “fans should expect to have more access than ever.”

Nashville already has been in the news with NASCAR over the past year as Speedway Motorsports Inc. has explored the concept of promoting a race at Fairgrounds Speedway, which played host to 42 Cup races from 1958-84.

“Nashville’s history with NASCAR is indisputable, and coupled with our event experience we are a perfect match for NASCAR Champions Week,” Butch Spyridon, president and CEO of Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp., said in a statement. “We look forward to welcoming NASCAR back home to Music City.”

NASCAR visits Tennesse twice annually for its race weekends at Bristol Motor Speedway.

“From the ‘Birthplace of Country Music’ in Bristol to the home of country music in Nashville, we join all Tennesseans in welcoming the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Awards Ceremony to the Volunteer State,” Bristol Motor Speedway Executive Vice President and General Manager Jerry Caldwell said in a release from the track. “Music City never misses a beat when hosting high-profile events, and every race fan will want to join in when the stars of NASCAR roar into town for this season-ending celebration.”

Bristol Motor Speedway in running to manage Nashville’s Fairgrounds Speedway

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Bristol Motor Speedway is among at least two groups under consideration to manage Fairgrounds Speedway in Nashville, track officials told NBC Sports on Wednesday evening.

“We can confirm that Bristol Motor Speedway (BMS) has submitted a proposal to manage the historic Fairgrounds Speedway and would be honored to serve as its promoter,” BMS executive vice president and general manager Jerry Caldwell said in a statement.

UPDATE: Bid to run track to go to current owner, Tennessean reports

The .596-mile track, which has a seating capacity of 15,000, was previously known as Nashville Speedway and Music City Motorplex.

The Speedway last held a NASCAR Cup race in 1984 (Geoffrey Bodine won), while its last Xfinity race was in 2000 (Randy Lajoie won), the same year of its last Truck race (Randy Tolsma won).

More recently, the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East last raced there in 2008, the same year as the NASCAR Southwest Series also raced there.

Caldwell continued: “Bruton Smith, executive chairman and Marcus Smith, chief executive officer (of BMS’s parent company, Speedway Motorsports Inc.), have a vision that the venue can again become a premier destination and they have a solid reputation of creating world-class facilities.

“If selected, the BMS team stands ready to work in collaboration with the city of Nashville to boost the fan experience, improve safety and produce iconic events at the Fairgrounds Speedway. We are confident that great success can be achieved for the racetrack while balancing the quality of life for its surrounding neighbors.”

According to a report in The Tennessean newspaper, BMS is one of at least two groups vying to manage the track, which is the second-oldest continually operating track in the U.S. The other group is headed by current facility manager Tony Formosa, who has operated the track since 2010.

The prospect of BMS caught the attention of several current and former NASCAR drivers on social media:

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Report: Fairgrounds Speedway promoter seeks to return NASCAR racing to Nashville

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The promoter of Fairgrounds Speedway in Nashville, Tennessee, is seeking a long-term agreement with the Metropolitan Board of Fair Commissioners to operate the .596-mile track in hopes of luring NASCAR regional and touring series events, according to The Tennessean.

The track once hosted NASCAR’s top series. The Cup series raced there from 1958-84. The Xfinity Series raced there in 1984, 1988-89 and 1995-2000. The Camping World Truck Series raced there from 1996-2000.

Among the track’s winners were Richard Petty, Darrell Waltrip, Dale Earnhardt and Geoff Bodine, who won the final Cup race there in July 1984.

Track promoter Tony Formosa stated in a column in April in The Tennessean that with a “five-year (agreement) or longer, we could restore this track to its glory days and again be an important economic driver to Nashville.” That would include seeking NASCAR-sanctioned races.

Monday’s story states that Formosa has had a contract to operate the facility since 2010 but it has been mostly year-to-year contracts.

The last NASCAR-sanctioned race at that track was a K&N Pro Series East race in 2008.

NASCAR issued a statement to the newspaper about the track.

“NASCAR has a long history in the Nashville area and our fans there are as passionate as any place we race,” the organization said in its statement. “NASCAR races are in demand, and we’re pleased with our current lineup of racetracks. Many of the discussions related to racing in Nashville have centered around the popular regional and touring series events.”

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Grandson of Richard Petty making ARCA debut this weekend in Nashville

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Thad Moffitt, the 16-year-old grandson of Richard Petty, will make his ARCA Racing Series debut this weekend, Richard Petty Motorsports announced Tuesday.

Moffitt, the oldest son of Brian and Rebecca Moffitt, will debut in the ARCA Music City 200 at Fairgrounds Speedway in Nashville, Tennessee. He will drive the No. 46 car for Empire Racing Group, a Richard Petty Motorsports development team, with primary sponsorship from Transportation Impact.

Moffitt is coming off a 2016 in which he won the championship in the Southeast Limited Late Model Series.

He won his first race in the series last August.

“I love racing, being at the track and just learning and trying to get better each race,” Moffitt said in a press release. “The ERG team has been great, and I’ve had a lot of fun with them in the late model. They have a good ARCA program, and I really wanted to make my debut in this series. A lot of great drivers have raced in ARCA, and Uncle Kyle (Petty) and (cousin) Adam (Petty) have both won in this series. It makes me really want to follow in their footsteps. But, this is a learning process, too. I’m excited and ready, but I have a lot to learn.”

Moffitt will work with crew chief Mike Cheek, who supervised the driver in a test at Nashville.

“Thad has a lot of passion to follow in the footsteps of his family,” Cheek said in the press release. “He has won a championship in a limited late model and in just a few races in a NASCAR Late Model, he has shown his talents. He did well during the ARCA test, and no matter the result, this will be great experience at a young age.”

The Music City 200 will also include the North-South Shootout with the Southern Super Series and the ARCA CRA Super Series combo race.

“There’s a big feel difference, especially coming off the corner,” Moffitt said comparing the ARCA car to what he drove last year. “The ARCA cars have so much more horsepower. I was spinning my tires bad, but I learned to feed it gas as I go … then I picked up speed.

“Nashville’s an amazing track. I learned that it’s got multiple grooves. You could enter low and let it push up and bring it back down coming off. But once the tires got to 75 laps or so, you could pretty much run the second groove all the way around. I love the banking in that track … the way it sucks you into the corner.”

The ARCA Music City 200 will be broadcast at 9 p.m. ET Saturday on MAV TV

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