DGR-Crosley

DGR-Crosley

Former NHRA champ Tanner Gray full speed ahead on NASCAR career

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Adrenaline is adrenaline.

But how Tanner Gray experiences it has changed dramatically since he won the 2018 NHRA Pro Stock championship.

The 20-year-old traded in the adrenaline shots that came with seven-second runs at over 200 MPH for the more drawn out adrenaline rushes of NASCAR’s K&N Pro Series.

“You get different kinds of adrenaline rushes throughout the race, like the initial start you’re pretty amped up and ready to go,” Gray told NBC Sports. “The feeling on a restart is the same feeling you’re going to get lining up for a drag race.”

That’s what Gray experienced last Saturday when he claimed his first K&N Pro Series East win in an overtime finish at South Boston Speedway, a track he’d never visited before.

After earning his first career pole, the DGR-Crosley driver led 79 laps before a late caution set up a battle with Sam Mayer, the only other driver to lead more than one lap in the race.

The two drivers banged doors as they took the white flag with Gray grabbing the lead and then the win in just his fourth NASCAR start.

The win was a “relief” for Gray after his decision to change course in his career and return to racing on ovals after having previously competed in super late models.

“I think it definitely is a little bit of a relief to know when everything lines up we have the ability and have the talent and everything to do it,” Gray said. “It’s just a matter of doing it.”

A third generation drag racer, Gray’s last two years had been spent racing Pro Stocks, culminating in becoming the youngest NHRA champion in history. But the New Mexico native always had his sights set on NASCAR, believing it provided a better future for him.

“I was pretty dead set on doing this,” Gray said. “I told my dad (former Pro Stock driver Shane Gray) whether I won the championship or even won a race, I said ‘I think this will be it.'”

As a member of David Gilliland‘s DGR-Crosley team, Gray is now “100 percent” more busy than he ever was in the NHRA, splitting time between the K&N East and West and the ARCA Menards Series.

“This year I think I have close to 30-something races,” Gray said. “(Compared to) the NHRA schedule I raced in 24 races. When you go to the NHRA race you’re at the same place from Thursday to Monday … You fly in Thursday and you usually fly out Monday. But you’re at the same place.

“This week I go to Tuscon (for the K&N West race) and then fly straight from Tuscon to Toledo to test … I’m constantly moving around to different places, testing a lot more and everything else.”

Three days after his win, Gray experienced another first: he drove on a speedway for the first time in a Tuesday ARCA test at Charlotte Motor Speedway.

“Before that the biggest thing I had been on was a half-mile,” Gray said. “It definitely took a couple of runs just to get used to getting down in the corner and stuff. It didn’t feel really fast to me. … But I didn’t feel like it really took long to get used to everything. It’s going to take me a little bit to get to where I’m competitive.”

Despite the win in South Boston, Gray still feels very much like the rookie he is.

“I feel like I make new mistakes every race,” Gray said. “You’re just constantly learning. Last week at South Boston I had a really good race, ended up getting the brakes hot there towards the end and when you get brake heat, it creates tire heat and tire heat (causes) the tire to grow and it just gets tight. Even though I won, I still did some things wrong. Everything kind of lined up there for us to have that final restart and edge out Sam (Mayer). If it wasn’t for that final caution there, Sam probably would have won.”

Gray has blinders on now that he’s on his NASCAR path. Don’t expect to see him make any return visits to a drag strip. He considers that chapter of his life over.

Why ruin a good thing?

“It ended so well for me it’s almost not worth it to go back and go again,” Gray said. “My last race there I won the championship and won my last race the same weekend and ended with the best reaction time average. A bunch of different cool stuff. … If I’m not going to do it all the time then I really don’t feel the need to go back out there.”

 

Natalie Decker adds six Truck Series races to schedule

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Natalie Decker will race deeper into the Gander Outdoors Truck Series season with the addition of six races to her schedule, DGR-Crosley announced Tuesday.

The 21-year-old driver will compete in 17 races in the No. 54 Toyota with support from N29 Technologies.

Decker competed in the first three races of the year and earned a best finish of 13th at Las Vegas.

Her schedule includes all but four of the remaining races. Decker will not be in the truck at Eldora, Talladega, Michigan and Canada. The Truck race at Charlotte Motor Speedway will take the place of the ARCA race there.

Decker will still run the ARCA race at Talladega.

“I’m so excited to add more races with DGR-Crosley,” Decker said in a press release. “I’m very thankful for the opportunity to be with this team. David [Gilliland] does such a great job with putting the right people in the right positions, and I’m learning so much and enjoy working with Frank [Kerr, crew chief] and all my guys.

“I didn’t think that I would be racing this much this year in the Trucks, but I’m so excited that we are. I love competing in the Truck Series – it’s challenging but so fun. Looking forward to continuing to learn as much as possible and putting together solid finishes. This year is all about learning and getting experience.”

Ty Gibbs, grandson of Joe Gibbs, to make ARCA debut Saturday

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Ty Gibbs, the 16-year-old grandson of NASCAR team owner Joe Gibbs, will make his ARCA Series debut Saturday in the Pensacola 200 at Five Flags Speedway in Pensacola, Florida.

The younger Gibbs will split driving duties of the No. 18 Monster Energy/ORCA Coolers Toyota this season, competing in all of ARCA’s short track races, while 2017 ARCA Rookie of the Year Riley Herbst will wheel the car at superspeedway races.

We’re obviously excited to get to Five Flags and get my season started,” Ty Gibbs said. “But we’re equally excited to get to all of the tracks we’re going to race at this season. They’re all different and every one of them has their own challenges. Mark (McFarland, crew chief) has told me a lot about all of them.”

McFarland has stepped back from his duties as co-owner of MDM Motorsports to focus on serving as Gibbs’ crew chief. MDM Motorsports announced at the end of last season that it was withdrawing after two years on the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series circuit and that it would scale back its NASCAR K&N Pro Series East and ARCA programs to just two cars in 2019.

“It’s a lot less stress this year than last year, for sure,” McFarland said. “I am back to having fun. I enjoy being a crew chief. Once I transitioned from driving to being a crew chief, I really came to enjoy working with these young drivers. It’s fun to see these guys figure things out in two or three races that might have taken me a couple years to learn.”

When he takes the green flag Saturday, Gibbs — who also competes in the K&N East Series for DGR-Crosley Racing (a team owned by NASCAR driver David Gilliland) — will be seeking his second win of the racing season. He won a late model race at Myrtle Beach (South Carolina) Speedway on February 2, with his grandfather in attendance.

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Ryan Reed to drive for David Gilliland’s truck team in Las Vegas

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Ryan Reed will return to NASCAR competition next week, driving the No. 17 Toyota Tundra for DGR-Crosley in the Strat 200 NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series race on March 1 at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, the team announced Wednesday.

DGR-Crosley’s primary team owner is NASCAR driver David Gilliland. Reed’s truck will be sponsored by Dexcom, Inc., a leader in diabetes care and management. Reed has Type 1 diabetes.

It will be only the second Truck race of Reed’s career, and it will be at the same location, LVMS. Directing him atop the pit box will be veteran crew chief Kevin “Bono” Manion.

“I’m thankful to everyone who has played a part in getting me back behind the wheel of a racecar,” Reed said in a team press release. “I was in Daytona over the weekend and it was really disappointing to be there and not be racing.

“I’m thankful for Dexcom, David (Gilliland) and DGR-Crosley for giving me the opportunity to race again. The next part of my career is all about being competitive and being in equipment I know I can win in.”

Reed spent the previous five-plus seasons racing in the Xfinity Series for Roush Fenway Racing, making 171 starts and capturing two wins at Daytona, seven top fives and 26 top-10 finishes.

“Ryan has a lot of experience behind the wheel,” Gilliland said in the press release. “We are thrilled to welcome him to our program at DGR-Crosley. Not only will he be an asset to our program and provide key feedback as we continue to grow and improve, but it’ll also be an advantage to our younger drivers (Natalie Decker and Anthony Alfredo) to have someone with his experience as their teammate.

“We’re looking forward to getting Ryan and Bono paired up in Vegas. I think it’s going to be a really strong pairing.”

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Appeals panel upholds stiff penalties vs. David Gilliland, Ty Gibbs

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The National Motorsports Appeals Panel on Wednesday reaffirmed penalties against defending NASCAR K&N Pro Series East championship DGR Crosley team owner David Gilliland and driver Ty Gibbs.

However, the panel rescinded a penalty against car chief Chad Walters.

All three were originally assessed a P6 level penalty — the most severe in the K&N Series — for holding a private test on Jan. 14 at New Smyrna Speedway in Florida. While the team claimed the test was allowed because they were running an ARCA engine in the No. 17 K&N East team car, the appeals panel affirmed Gilliland and Gibbs violated NASCAR rules.

A NASCAR spokesperson told NBC Sports on the day the penalties were issued (Jan. 31) that the team used a NASCAR-approved spec engine in the test, not an ARCA engine. The use of the engine violated the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East Series testing policy, which specifically prohibits testing at a sanctioned track on the 2019 K&N Pro Series East schedule.

MORE: David Gilliland, Ty Gibbs given heavy penalties for violating preseason testing rules

The penalties assessed came from the following sections in the 2019 NASCAR Rule Book: Sections 12-5.3.7 and 12-5.3.7.1.5:

* Gilliland was fined $5,000; assessed with the loss of 100 NASCAR K&N Pro Series East Championship car owner points for the 2019 NKNPSE season; was suspended from the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East until the completion of the third NASCAR K&N Pro Series East event; and placed on NASCAR probation through December 31, 2019.

Per the appeals panel on Wednesday, all of the original penalties against Gilliland remain in place.

* Gibbs, the 16-year-old grandson of NASCAR Cup team owner Joe Gibbs, was fined $5,000; assessed with the loss of 100 NASCAR K&N Pro Series East Championship driver points for the 2019 NKNPSE season; was suspended from the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East until the completion of the third NASCAR K&N Pro Series East event; and placed on NASCAR probation through December 31, 2019.

Per the appeals panel on Wednesday, all of the original penalties against Gibbs remain in place.

Gibbs replaced Tyler Ankrum, who led DGR Crosley to the K&N East championship last season..

* Walters was originally fined $5,000 and suspended from the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East indefinitely.

Per the appeals panel on Wednesday, the penalties against Walters were rescinded.

The three members of the appeals panel are Dixon Johnston, Bill Mullis and Dale Pinilis.

Gilliland and Gibbs have the right to further appeal Wednesday’s decision to the National Motorsports Final Appeals Officer in accordance with Section 15 of the NASCAR Rule Book.

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