David Starr

Entry lists for Dover races

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Dover International Speedway will be packed with racing this weekend, holding one Truck race, two Xfinity races and two Cup races.

In Cup, only three races remain in the regular season before the 16-driver playoff field is set.

Here are the preliminary entry lists for Dover 

Cup – Drydene 311 (4 p.m. ET Saturday on NBCSN)

Cup – Drydene 311 (4 p.m. ET Sunday on NBCSN)

Forty cars are entered for both races this weekend.

Josh Bilicki is entered in the No. 53 car of Rick Ware Racing for either race. The 40 drivers listed for Saturday’s race also are listed for Sunday’s race.

Click here for Saturday Cup race entry list 

Click here for Sunday Cup race entry list

 

Xfinity – Drydene 200 (12:30 p.m. ET Saturday on NBCSN)

Xfinity – Drydene 200 (1 p.m. ET Saturday on NBCSN)

Thirty-six cars are entered for both races.

Daniel Hemric will drive the No. 8 for JR Motorsports on Saturday. Jeb Burton will drive the car in Sunday’s race. There are no other driver changes in the entry lists for Dover from Saturday to Sunday.

David Starr is listed for both races in the No. 07 car for SS Green Light Racing.

Click here for Saturday Xfinity race entry list

Click here for Sunday Xfinity race entry list

 

Truck – KDI Office Technology 200 (5 ET Friday on FS1)

Thirty-five trucks are entered for this race.

Click here for Truck entry list

‘Snowball effect’ led Bob Leavine to sell Cup team

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Seeing the “snowball effect” of a lack of sponsorship, cost for additional cars next year and the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on the economy, car owner Bob Leavine said Tuesday that it was clear that he needed to sell Leavine Family Racing.

The team announced Tuesday that it has been sold. The buyer has not been revealed.

Leavine said Tuesday that the team had 11 races available for sponsorship on rookie Christopher Bell‘s car before the coronavirus pandemic suspended the sport in March for 10 weeks. The team’s biggest sponsor, Leavine noted, was his construction company, which also has been impacted by the economic downturn brought on by the virus.

“We haven’t really sold anything and probably won’t sell anything going forward this year,” Leavine said Tuesday of sponsorship.

Leavine also cited a business model that he has been critical of, including the charter system.

Leavine Family Racing was not granted a charter but merged with Circle Sport Racing, which had a charter, for the 2016 season. The partnership ended after that season. Leavine Family Racing bought Tommy Baldwin Racing’s charter in Nov. 2016.

We definitely did not get out of our charter what we put into our charter,” said Leavine, who has not publicly revealed what was paid for the charter. “So, from our standpoint, it is very difficult to say that it was a great investment. It just allowed us to run full time for the five years after we bought it. That’s the best thing I can say for the charter system.”

Leavine Family Racing made its NASCAR debut in 2011. Christopher Bell joined the team prior to this season. (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

Another challenge was NASCAR’s move to push back the debut of the Next Gen car from 2021 to 2022. Leavine Family Racing has an affiliation with Joe Gibbs Racing this season for chassis and support but Leavine said the plan was not to continue that next year.

“We had a whole lot of things banking on the Next Gen coming in,” Leavine said. “Our deal with JGR, our affiliation required us to do certain things. We were looking forward to being a standalone team with one or two cars. So, the pandemic, and sponsorship and how it affected (his construction business), our major sponsor, and then having to come back and buy all the cars again for next year, because we had planned on not needing cars next year.

“It was a snowball effect on multiple things. We saw no way out. We could not afford the affiliation, and what we did this year, next year. That’s what we banked on. Okay, we will do this one year, run good, get our charter value up, and we had a plan. That plan came tumbling down with the pandemic. Then you take a bad business model; it doesn’t work for us.”

Leavine said he lobbied NASCAR and owners in the spring for particular changes, which he did not reveal. When those ideas were rejected, Leavine said he was “very disappointed in what came out of that meeting. I knew that was probably going to be the straw that broke our back. I had to start looking for how best do we protect our team. How best do we keep people employed. A lot of things went into that decision.”

Leavine Family Racing has competed in NASCAR since 2011, making its debut with David Starr at Texas Motor Speedway on April 9. The organization didn’t run a full schedule until 2016 with Michael McDowell and Ty Dillon splitting the ride. Others who have driven for the team include Kasey Kahne, Regan SmithMatt DiBenedetto and Bell.

I really gave it all I had for the 10 years and the last five primarily when we went full-time, and I committed, and I thought we could make a difference and be a good team,” Leavine said. “A responsible and respected team in NASCAR. To walk away and not have completed that, I’ve never had to do that before and give up on anything. But I could not let it destroy our business – a 41-year old business – in Texas during these times, so you have to protect something and that’s a profitable organization.”

Leavine Family Racing announces it has been sold

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Leavine Family Racing owner Bob Leavine announced Tuesday the sale of the Cup team.

He did not state a buyer in his statement. Leavine said in a statement that the team will continue to compete through the rest of the year.

MORE: Bob Leavine reflects on team’s rise from start-and-park car

In his statement, Leavine said:

“It’s with great sadness today that I announce the sale of the Leavine Family Racing team, assets and charter. Since 2011, Sharon and our entire family have enjoyed being a part of the NASCAR community with Matt DiLiberto joining the family as a co-owner in 2016. We will say goodbye at the conclusion of the 2020 NASCAR Cup Series season.

Bob Leavine. (Photo by Getty Images)

“This decision has not been made lightly. Family has always been a part of the team’s name and this is how we view every member of our race team — as our family. There is no good time to make this announcement, but doing it earlier allows our people to explore employment opportunities, for next season, to provide for their families. There will be opportunities with the new owners which was important to our decision.

“This year has been challenging for not only our race team, but our industry, our country and the entire world. The pandemic has impacted our economy and unfortunately that’s just not something we are able to overcome in order to continue racing beyond this season.

“Leavine Family Racing will continue to compete through the end of 2020, and we want to leave on a positive note – contending for top-finishes with Christopher Bell, Toyota, TRD, and all of our partners. Thank you to everyone for your support through this journey. Thank you to our partners and fans and most of all, thank you to everyone who has been part of the Leavine Family Racing family over the last decade.”

Leavine said the chassis and equipment that came from its alliance with Joe Gibbs Racing will return to JGR at the end of the season and are not part of the sale.

Leavine Family Racing has competed in NASCAR since 2011, making its debut with David Starr at Texas Motor Speedway on April 9. The organization didn’t run a full schedule until 2016 with Michael McDowell and Ty Dillon splitting the ride. Others who have driven for the team include Kasey Kahne, Regan Smith, Matt DiBenedetto and Bell.

Leavine Family Racing is winless in 240 Cup starts. Its best finish is second with DiBenedetto at last fall’s Bristol night race.

Toyota Racing issues a statement from Paul Doleshal, group manager for motorsports, Toyota Motor North America:

“We want to thank Bob and Sharon Leavine, Matt DiLiberto, Jeremy Lange and everyone at Leavine Family Racing (LFR) for a successful partnership. We entered this 2020 racing season with high hopes for LFR and the team has not disappointed. While the season may not have started out as everyone wanted, after returning from the shutdown due to COVID-19, LFR rebounded with some very strong on-track performances. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the world and more closely, the entire NASCAR family in so many ways and for LFR, that has forced the sale of the race team. We’re certainly disappointed and saddened by the news, but most importantly, we want to wish Bob, Sharon, Matt, Jeremy and everyone impacted the best of luck in their future endeavors.”

Austin Cindric celebrates third consecutive Xfinity win

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Kyle Busch‘s 98th career win in the Xfinity Series lasted less than an hour before his No. 54 Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota was disqualified following Saturday’s race at Texas Motor Speedway.

Busch was DQ’d after his car failed height regulations during post-race inspection. He and Joe Gibbs Racing have until Noon ET on Monday to file an appeal, according to Xfinity Series director Wayne Auton.

Busch finishes last in the 37-car field and Austin Cindric is declared the winner. That makes it three straight wins for Cindric, who won both ends of the Xfinity doubleheader last weekend at Kentucky Speedway.

MORE: Updated Xfinity results, standings from Texas

“It’s great to get our Mustang into victory lane, no matter how it happens,” Cindric said. “It was a great points day. … I want to win on the track and felt like we had a shot to do that today but maybe didn’t execute as well as we should have and that’s what kept us out. But fast cars and being in position, that’s what counts.”

Cindric becomes the ninth different driver to win three or more consecutive races in the Xfinity Series. All three have come this season, with his two other career wins coming last season, both on road courses.

“I have more wins now on ovals than road courses, so I’ll take it,” Cindric said with a chuckle. “It’s great to be able to capitalize on fast race cars. I said it last week and I’ll say it again today. We’ve just got to keep building on that.”

Chase Briscoe finished runner-up followed by Justin Allgaier, Harrison Burton and Michael Annett.

STAGE 1 WINNER: Justin Allgaier (sixth stage win of season)

STAGE 2 WINNER: Justin Allgaier (seventh stage win of season)

WHO HAD A GOOD RACE: Chase Briscoe’s runner-up finish marked his fifth consecutive top-five finish. He has two wins, two runner-up finishes and a fourth-place result in that time. … Although he remains winless this season, Allgaier won both stages of the race, giving him seven stage wins thus far this season.

WHO HAD A BAD RACE: Riley Herbst’s day ended early after he appeared to be tapped from behind by Noah Gragson on Lap 5 and slammed into the outside wall. Gragson denied over his team radio that he made contact. Herbst finished 36th in the 37-car field.

NOTABLE: Temperatures in cars were as high as 145 degrees at the end of Stage 1. “I wouldn’t say it was unbearable by any means,” Chase Briscoe said. “I’m hoping it’s even hotter than this next week at Kansas.”

WHAT’S NEXT: July 25, Kansas Lottery 250 at Kansas Speedway, 5 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

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Entry list for Wednesday’s Cup race at Martinsville

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History will be made Wednesday night when the NASCAR Cup Series holds its first night race at Martinsville Speedway.

The race is scheduled for 7 p.m. ET on FS1.

There are 40 cars entered.

Reed Sorenson is entered in Tommy Baldwin Racing’s No. 7 Chevrolet.

JJ Yeley is entered in Rick Ware Racing’s No. 27 Ford.

David Starr is in the Rick Ware Racing’s No. 53 Chevrolet.

Garrett Smithley is listed for Spire Motorsports’ No. 77 Chevrolet.

This race was won last year by Brad Keselowski over Chase Elliott and Kyle Busch.

Martin Truex Jr. won the playoff race over William Byron and Keselowski.

Click here for Cup entry list