Darrell Waltrip

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Darrell Waltrip taking the checkered flag on his broadcasting career

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NASCAR Hall of Famer Darrell Waltrip is retiring as a broadcaster upon the conclusion of Fox Sports’ final Cup race in June, he announced Thursday.

“I could’ve waited until Charlotte or somewhere else down the road, but it’s been hanging over my head,” Waltrip told The Tennessean. “I just wanted to clear the air, let people know what my plans are and then other people can make plans accordingly. Like who’s going to take my place or is somebody going to take my place?”

Waltrip’s last race will be June 23 at Sonoma Raceway, the final race for Fox Sports before NBC Sports broadcasts the rest of the Cup season.

The 72-year-old Waltrip has been with Fox since it began broadcasting NASCAR races in 2001, making his debut in the 2001 Daytona 500 – the race his younger brother Michael won and the race Dale Earnhardt suffered fatal injuries.

Outspoken and passionate, Waltrip sought to reach out to NASCAR fans in his own way.

“Darrell has been the heart and soul of the Fox NASCAR booth since day one, so it’s incredibly bittersweet to know this is his final season,” said Fox Sports CEO & executive producer Eric Shanks. “DW’s unmatched charisma and passion helped Fox Sports build its fan base when we first arrived at Daytona in 2001, and he has been the cornerstone of our NASCAR coverage ever since.”

Waltrip told The Tennessean he considered retiring earlier.

“My dream had been that I was going to retire in 2017 because I love 17,” he told the newspaper. “Well ’17 came and I said, ‘Whoa, whoa, whoa, bad decision, no, no, no. I’m not quite ready for that.’

“A big wake-up call for me was when our first grandchild was born 14 months ago and I would come and go and it was just like when I’d watched my girls grow up. They grew up at the racetrack and they were grown and married before I hardly knew it.”

Waltrip also told the newspaper that the addition of Jeff Gordon also played a role in Waltrip’s decision to retire.

“Jeff Gordon coming along beside of me has just made me aware of what I know I know — that I’m old school,” Waltrip told The Tennessean. “I grew up in this sport in one era and Jeff grew up in a totally different era. When he talks to the drivers they talk a different language than I ever talked. When he relates to the drivers he relates to them in a different way than I do. And so it just became obvious to me it’s a young man’s sport. I’m not a young man anymore.”

What’s next for Waltrip, other than spending more time with family? He’s not sure.

“Every time I’ve made a change in my career or in my life I thought it was the worst thing that had ever happened to me,” Waltrip told the newspaper. “And then next thing you know it was actually the best thing that ever happened to me. So I’m optimistic about future.”

The three-time Cup champion was inducted into the third class of the NASCAR Hall of Fame in January 2012. His 84 career victories ties him with Bobby Allison for fourth on the all-time list. Waltrip was the recipient of the Bill France Award of Excellence in 2000 for his lifetime of achievements in the sport.

NASCAR President Steve Phelps praised Waltrip in a statement:

“For nearly five decades, few people have been as synonymous with NASCAR as Darrell Waltrip,” Phelps said. “A Hall of Famer on the track and in the booth, Waltrip brought quick wit, tireless passion and a wealth of stock car racing knowledge to millions of NASCAR fans on FOX for 19 seasons. We are grateful for Waltrip’s many contributions to the sport over the past 47 years, both as a champion driver and broadcaster. On behalf of everyone at NASCAR, we wish DW all the best in retirement.”

 

 

Kevin Harvick says he’s not planning to retire any time soon

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FORT WORTH, Texas — Kevin Harvick says he has contracts through the 2021 season and does not plan to quit racing before then.

There had been some questions about Harvick’s future with a report from the Sports Business Journal that Fox Sports analyst Darrell Waltrip may decide to retire after this season. Harvick has been used on numerous Fox Xfinity Series race broadcasts as an analyst.

Harvick, who is 43 years, old, was adamant he will keep racing.

“I’m not getting out of the race car,” he said Friday at Texas Motor Speedway. “I feel really comfortable with where I’m at … in the race car, where my home life is. I feel fairly confident that being a part of TV side of things is something I want to do in the future but it’s not going to happen in the next couple of years, I can tell you that.”

“We have a lot of things that are going really well, the race car is one of them. There’s no way that happens. I have contacts and things that are already in place that are through 2021.”

Harvick also said there’s no reason for him to exit the car. He’s coming off a season where he won a career-high eight Cup races. He’s finished in the top three in points in five of the past six years, including his championship season of 2014. Harvick, a future Hall of Famer, has 45 career Cup wins, which ranks 17th on the all-time victory list.

“The more you talk to people who retired and did things it’s always like, ‘Man, I wish I would have just stayed in the competitive situation I was in and not tried to do something different or quit too soon,’ “ Harvick said.

Harvick also hinted he could be racing for a while

“You hear a lot of talk about the schedule getting shorter,” Harvick said of future Cup schedules possibly being cut from the 36-race lineup now. “As you look at things, that makes life easier to manipulate. If things get shorter, I feel good in a race car and I just don’t understand why a lot of people think you should get out.

“There’s so much to do with being competitive in this sport, there’s so much to do with experience. If it’s going good, why wouldn’t you want to keep going? There’s too many things that I still enjoy about it.”

Jeff Gordon agrees to multi-year extension with Fox Sports

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Jeff Gordon has agreed to a multi-year extension to serve as a NASCAR analyst for Fox Sports, NBC Sports has confirmed.

Gordon, who will be inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame on Feb. 1, has served as an analyst for Fox since he retired from full-time racing after the 2016 season.

He has joined Mike Joy and Darrell Waltrip on Fox’s broadcast of Cup Series races.

Gordon will be joined at Fox this year by Jamie McMurray, who will serve as a studio analyst on NASCAR Race Day and NASCAR Race Hub.

Milestones Cup drivers could reach in 2019

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NASCAR Cup drivers have many milestones ahead of them in 2019.

Here is a look at some that could be reached this season:

Wins

Jimmie Johnson has 83 victories and is tied with Cale Yarborough for sixth on the all-time list. His next victory will tie him with Darrell Waltrip and Bobby Allison in fourth. Johnson was winless in 2018, the first time he ran a full Cup season without a victory.

Since winning in his rookie season of 2005, Kyle Busch has never failed to find Victory Lane in the Cup series – a streak of 14 seasons. He’s also had great success in the Xfinity and Truck series. Busch is six total wins away from achieving 200 victories across NASCAR’s top three divisions. Busch has 51 Cup wins, 92 Xfinity wins and 51 Truck wins.

Kevin Harvick is five wins away from joining the exclusive 50-win club that has 13 members. Johnson and Busch are the only active drivers with more than 50 Cup wins.

Hendrick Motorsports looks to extend its streak of consecutive seasons with a Cup win to 34 this year.

Last year Erik Jones and Chase Elliott won, marking three consecutive seasons in which drivers scored career-first victories. That was the longest streak since 2005-2007. The last time at least four consecutive seasons highlighted first-time winners was from 1994-2003.

Top 5s

Jimmie Johnson is seven top fives away from tying Lee Petty for 10th on the all time list with 231.

Kevin Harvick is nine away from achieving 200 top fives.

Top 10s

With four top 10s, Clint Bowyer will become the 37th driver to crack the 200 mark.

Kurt Busch is 20 away from achieving 300 top 10s, which will make him the 21st driver to do so.

Jimmie Johnson has the most top 10s among active drivers with 352 (11th on the all-time list). With nine top 10s he will tie Terry Labonte in 10th.

Kevin Harvick (336) could become the active driver with the most top 10s if he earns 16 more than Johnson.

Poles

Since winning his first pole in the spring Bristol race of 2010, Joey Logano has earned at least one per year. In 2019, he looks to extend his streak to 10 consecutive seasons. Last year, he earned only one pole at Kansas in the fall.

Chase Elliott has won at least one pole in his first three full-time seasons at the Cup level, but he has never earned more than two in a year.

Career Starts

Kurt Busch has 648 starts, which places him currently 23rd on the list. If he makes all the races in 2019 he will pass Dale Earnhardt Sr. and move to 18th on the list.

Kevin Harvick (646), Ryan Newman (620) and Jimmie Johnson (615) also have more than 600 starts.

Jimmie Johnson and Ryan Newman each have 612 consecutive starts to start the season, which ties them for ninth on the list. If they make nine more consecutive starts they will catch Mark Martin. With 16 more consecutive starts, they will catch Jeff Burton. If both Johnson and Newman make all of the races in 2019, they will end the season tied for sixth with Dale Earnhardt Sr. (648).

Assuming the following drivers make all of the races, this is when they should reach their respective milestones:

500th

Kyle Busch: Feb. 24th at Atlanta
Martin Truex Jr.: Aug. 11 at Michigan
Denny Hamlin: Oct. 6 at Dover
Clint Bowyer: Oct. 13 at Talladega

300th

Michael McDowell: June 9 at Michigan
Aric Almirola: July 21 at New Hampshire

200th

Austin Dillon: March 31 at Texas
Kyle Larson: June 30 at Chicagoland

100th

Ty Dillon: April 28 at Talladega
Erik Jones: Sept. 1 at Darlington
Daniel Suarez: Sept. 21 at Richmond

Coffee with Kyle: Richard Petty and Dale Inman went separate ways

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With the end of the 2018 season, Jimmie Johnson and Chad Knaus have parted ways. Johnson has a new crew chief in Kevin Meendering; Knaus has a new driver in William Byron.

The latest edition of “Coffee with Kyle” takes a look at another legendary pairing that split up: Richard Petty and his cousin Dale Inman.

Petty and Inman both believe Knaus has a better chance at winning another championship than Johnson. They came to that conclusion based on experience.

Petty and Inman combined for 166 wins and seven championships before they split up.

“(Going our separate ways) was probably one of the best things that ever happened to both of us,” Petty said. “Because once we got away from each other we realized how we depended on each other.”

Separating might have been good for them personally, but Petty’s performance was never the same. He went on to win just two more races.

Petty’s 199th win came at Dover in May 1984.

“Dover was a big win,” Petty said. “It had been a while since we won. But then everything was ‘the next race, the next race, the next race’ before we went to Daytona. Everybody was expecting the 200 anytime. We was too. But it couldn’t have been any better than for us to win the 200th race July the 4th in front of the President of the United States (Ronald Reagan).

“If you wrote a script, nobody would have bought it.”

Part 1: Richard Petty: Racing ‘took us to the real world’
Part 2: The story behind debut of Plymouth’s NASCAR Superbird

Inman was hired by Rod Osterlund in 1980 and crewed the car for Dale Earnhardt and later Joe Ruttman without another win. 

“Then we got Tim Richmond and what a natural he was,” Inman said. “Didn’t know nothing about a race car. … Even Earnhardt respected him a lot, because he came in and raced Earnhardt.”

In 1982 Richmond won twice at Riverside. Those were the first wins for Inman after leaving Petty Enterprises.

Inman scored another championship with Terry Labonte in 1984. They won on consistency with only two wins but top fives in 17 of 30 races that year.

Regarding a short-lived pairing with Earnhardt, Inman said: “He couldn’t control himself. Darrell Waltrip intimidated him so bad it was unreal. The bad thing on my resume was I never won a race with Earnhardt.”

The episode can be found on the NBC Sports YouTube page.

Click here to watch the “Coffee with Kyle” episode with Tony Stewart.