Darius Rucker

Long: A day unlike any other in NASCAR

Leave a comment

Drivers walked alone to their cars Sunday at Darlington Raceway. No team members with them. No family around them. No fans anywhere.

New procedures in an era of the coronavirus.

Drivers carried their helmet, water bottle and other supplies. They headed to their cars amid questions about NASCAR’s first race in 10 weeks, making it the first major U.S. professional sport to return during these times.

Would masks and social distancing be effective? What if someone showed symptoms? What if it was a driver?

“Up until probably about two or three hours before the race, I was ready for something to go wrong,” Brad Keselowski said in a zoom call with media after finishing 13th in a race won by Kevin Harvick.

“What’s it going to be? Is someone going to be sick? Or is there going to be somebody boycotting outside the racetrack? But nobody did. Nothing bad happened. They pulled this thing off. It feels little bit like a Christmas miracle.”

Consider it Christmas all alone.

The track was empty except for about 900 essential personnel that included drivers, team members, series officials, safety personnel, TV personnel, media and others.

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR executive vice president and chief racing development officer, said everyone who went through the health screening passed and “our doctor at the check‑in … was 100% confident we were in a good place to go racing.”

NASCAR Chairman and CEO Jim France was at the track but stayed out of the infield. Instead, he got on the track’s p.a. system before the race to thank the teams for their efforts to bring racing back.

Joey Logano carries his equipment to his car before Sunday’s Cup race at Darlington Raceway. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Many were excited to be at the track again. Joey Logano said he was the first driver to arrive Sunday. After he passed his health screening, he went to his motorhome to isolate for a few hours before going to the car. When he unpacked his uniform — which normally would have been on the team’s hauler but is now the driver’s responsibility to limit contact with team members — Logano realized he had packed two left shoes.

Thankfully there was an extra pair in the hauler, but I thought that was funny,” he said.

After a few hours alone, the waiting finally ended and drivers emerged from their motorhomes or vehicles.

“About 10 minutes before we are supposed to be (by the cars), all of a sudden you see drivers popping out of their motorhomes carrying their helmets and walking to the grid,” Logano said. “That was funny. I have never seen anything like it.”

No one has.

Or heard anything like they did Sunday.

“Just very subdued, very quiet,” Denny Hamlin said. “That’s the biggest thing I noticed, it was just how quiet everything was.”

Erik Jones said it felt as if they were at a test.

“Then you get on pit road, and it feels more like a race,” he said, noting the pit crews in their stalls and cars on the grid. “You are just missing the fans. Unique, different. It was weird standing there for the anthem and it’s playing over the loudspeakers and then you hop in and go.”

After Darius Rucker sang the National Anthem, which was videotaped, a montage of healthcare workers came on TV screens and over the p.a system to give the command to start engines for the first time in 71 days.

“Man, that is a good sign,” Jimmie Johnson said to his team on the radio after he cranked his engine.

But the jitters remained for many.

No one knew what to expect when the green flag waved to begin the race. With no practice and no qualifying, drivers were making their first lap at speed on Lap 1. Seven of the 40 drivers competing Sunday had never run a lap at speed in a Cup car at Darlington.

“The feelings, the nerves, the anxiety, the excitement, knowing we were in uncharted territory,” Kurt Busch said about the start.

But nearly as soon as the green came out, the yellow flag waved. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. made contact with another car and crashed into the SAFER barrier on the inside wall along the backstretch. His race was over before completing a lap.

Drivers had a chance to catch their breath and then do it again.

Then, it became about racing. The lack of fans was noticeable in the background of TV shots. The color of the cars contrasted with the gray of many of the track’s empty seats.

As the race progressed, the focus remained on the track. Johnson wrecked on the final lap of Stage 1. Harvick and Alex Bowman showed they had the two best cars.

Bowman battled Harvick for two laps after a late restart but Harvick pulled away and went on to score his 50th career victory, tying him with NASCAR Hall of Famers Junior Johnson and Ned Jarrett on the all-time wins list.

A milestone victory, a first win this season, a fifth consecutive top-10 finish. All things to celebrate. Harvick screamed on the radio in celebration and did doughnuts at the start/finish line and then climbed to his car to silence.

“The weirdest part of the day for me was getting out of the car and not hearing anybody cheering,” Harvick said.

After his TV interview, he drove to Victory Lane for a muted celebration.

“There were two photographers there, no team guys,” Harvick said. “I was able to kind of get my team guys a nice little elbow bump there as I left Victory Lane, tell them great job. Those guys didn’t get a chance to take a picture with their car. Just a lot of sacrifices that go into it.

“But in the end, in the big picture of things, being able to do what we did today, and that’s race, is what everybody wants to do.”

 and on Facebook

Sunday’s Cup race at Darlington: Start time, lineup and more

Leave a comment

Racing is back!

After a 10-week break because of the COVID-19 pandemic, NASCAR returns with the Real Heroes 400 at Darlington Raceway.

There will be no fans. Teams will be limited to essential personnel and must adhere to NASCAR’s guidelines, which includes wearing a mask.

But racing is back today.

Here’s all the info for today’s race.

(All times are Eastern)

START: Healthcare workers across the country will give the command to start engines at 3:42. The green flag is scheduled to wave at 3:53 p.m.

PRERACE: Garage access health screening begins at 7:30 a.m. (teams are assigned specific times). Engine prime and final adjustments at 1:30 p.m. Driver/crew chief meeting is at 2 p.m. and can be seen on NASCAR.com. Drivers report to their cars at 3:20 p.m. The invocation will be given at 3:35 p.m. by Rev. Sam Turbeville from McLeod Regional Medical Center. The National Anthem will be performed at 3:36 p.m. by three-time Grammy winner Darius Rucker.

DISTANCE: The race is 293 laps (400 miles) around the 1.366-mile oval.

PACE LAPS: At the direction of race control, drivers will have the opportunity to run one pace lap down pit road before the green flag for a pit road speed check. If you stop in your box for any reason, pull over or slow down, you will start at the rear of the field.

STAGES: Stage 1 ends on Lap 90. Stage 2 ends on Lap 185.

COMPETITION CAUTION: Lap 30. The field will be frozen at the caution. When pit road is open, only the top 20 cars will be allowed to pit. Each car that pits must beat the pace car off pit road to retain its position. On the next lap, the other 20 cars will pit. Each car that pits must beat the pace car off pit road to retain its position. Then, the top 20 cars will be allowed to pit a second time. On the next lap, the other 20 cars will be allowed to pit again. After the second cycle for each team is completed, the lineup will be set and the race will resume.

TV/RADIO: Fox will televise the race. Coverage begins at 3. Motor Racing Network’s coverage will begin at 2:30 p.m. and can also be heard at mrn.com. SiriusXM NASCAR Radio will carry MRN’s broadcast.

FORECAST: The wunderground.com forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies with a high of 85 degrees and 15% chance of rain at the race’s start.

LAST RACE: Joey Logano won at Phoenix on March 8 in the last Cup race before the season was suspended by the COVID-19 pandemic. It was Logano’s second win in the season’s first four races. Kevin Harvick was second. Kyle Busch placed third.

LAST RACE AT DARLINGTON: Erik Jones won last September’s Southern 500. Kyle Larson was second. Kyle Busch placed third.

LINEUP (set by owner points and random draw): Darlington Cup starting lineup

TO THE REAR: Kyle Busch (car failed pre-race inspection twice)

PRERACE READING:

Nate Ryan: NASCAR return another sign of Darlington’s resilience, renaissance

Ryan Newman: “I feel like a complete walking miracle”

No time to wait: “We’re just going all in” on Lap 1 at Darlington 

NASCAR’s break from racing familiar to Kyle Busch

NASCAR’s Steve Phelps: “I don’t foresee any further shutdown for us”

Friday 5: Will iRacing grudges carry over to track?

Matt Kenseth not expecting “any kind of special treatment” at Darlington

Storylines: What will NASCAR’s top free agents do?

Storylines: New Procedures for drivers, teams in return to racing

Storylines: What’s changed in NASCAR Cup Series

Storylines: Where Cup series left off