Archie St. Hilaire

Daniel McFadin

Corey LaJoie: Go Fas Racing ride ‘probably the best Christmas gift I’ve ever had’

Leave a comment

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — In September 2010, Archie St. Hilaire delivered a clear message to Randy LaJoie after a K&N Pro Series East race at New Hampshire Motor Speedway.

“Your kid will never run in anything I own, ever, ever, ever,” the owner of Go Fas Racing declared.

St. Hilaire was caught up in the heat of the moment. The car he owned, the No. 38 driven by Alan Tardiff, had just been wrecked from the lead with two laps to go in the scheduled distance of the 125-lap race.

The culprit? An 18-year-old Corey LaJoie, the son of Randy, a two-time Xfinity Series champion who also owned his son’s K&N ride.

LaJoie had been on Tardiff’s inside entering Turn 3 when they made contact. LaJoie spun while Tardiff hit the wall.

LaJoie went on to finish 13th and in the last three years has made 57 Cup starts. The New Hampshire race was Tardiff’s last in a top NASCAR series.

Two weeks ago, just over eight years after the incident, LaJoie signed with Go Fas Racing to become the next full-time driver of its No. 32 Ford in the Cup Series.

When the signing was done, St. Hilaire told his new driver he had a call to make.

“I got to call your dad and tell him I lied to him a few years ago,” St. Hilaire recalled Thursday during the team’s announcement at the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

“That’s one thing I’ve learned in NASCAR, never say never. ‘Cause that’s a long time,” St. Hilaire said.

Thursday saw LaJoie, now 27, finally get to share “probably the best Christmas gift I’ve ever had.”

A week before he’s set to get married, LaJoie was announced as the next driver of the No. 32 Ford, a car previously driven by Matt DiBenedetto.

It’s the first time in LaJoie’s Cup career that he’s known in December that he’ll have a ride in February.

The new ride comes with other perks he’s never had in his last two years of Cup racing.

“A paycheck is good,” LaJoie said, referencing the 32 starts he made in 2017 with the now-defunct BK Racing.

“Engines that don’t blow up are good,” LaJoie said of his 23 starts in 2018 with TriStar Motorsports, where he had seven DNFs, five for expired engines.

But most importantly, LaJoie is set to be in the car for every points race for the first time. Not even his father can claim a full Cup season on his resume.

“Being in the car every week is going to be huge,” LaJoie said. “To work with the same group of guys, week in and week out where you can actually prepare, watch film, studying notes and then actually go from the first race of the year back for the second time is going to be huge. I think there’s nothing but positives here.”

That’s not an understatement for LaJoie.

Four years ago, he was a “development” driver (air quotes added by LaJoie) for Richard Petty Motorsports in the Xfinity Series.

“I was taking a different path. I just had to pay the bills,” LaJoie said. “They gave me a T-shirt and a backpack and paid me 40 grand a year and sat me on the couch for two years. They couldn’t find me any sponsorship. They put me in that (Biagi-DenBeste Racing) car. I tried to do too much. I didn’t realize the gap from a 15th-place car to a fifth-place car is as big as it is. Anytime up to that point in my career if we were 15th it was because I wasn’t driving it right or I wasn’t driving it hard enough.

“Knowing when to take a 15th-place car and finish 14th or 13th after a couple of guys wreck, I had to learn the hard way. I was lucky enough people saw the talent even when I was wrecking cars or putting myself in bad positions.”

LaJoie is also three years’ removed from being paid $500 to fly to the West Coast to be a crew chief on a K&N West team. He actually produced two wins in the series with David Mayhew, with one coming at Sonoma Raceway.

But Sundays were hard for the third-generation driver.

“There was times where Sunday nights where I was wondering what I was doing, if I should go back and start welding seats or go be a crew chief,” LaJoie said.

A path to the latter was provided at one point by one of the most successful crew chiefs in Cup history.

“Chad Knaus called me probably … four years ago now, wanting to stick me over and be a car chief (at JR Motorsports) working through that system,” LaJoie said. “I was like, ‘Man, I’m not ready to give up the driving thing yet.’ And it’s just worked out with different partners. I’ve surrounded myself with good people, and (it) ultimately gets me hooked up with Archie, and now we’re really going to make something happen here next year.”

And what happens after 2019 for an owner who wanted nothing to do with his new driver eight years ago?

St. Hilaire is taking it one year at a time.

“Everybody in our business we have a one-year deal, and I always say, ‘Let’s make sure we like each other,’ ” St. Hilaire said. “I do it in my regular businesses, because if it’s after one year and he doesn’t like me and I don’t like him or somebody doesn’t like anybody, I don’t want to drag anybody through a two- or three-year deal. Hopefully it’s many years, but at this point let’s try it and make sure we like it and move forward from there.”

For LaJoie, it will be his first full-time ride in NASCAR since 2012 in the K&N East.

“I need to be careful,” he said. “I might make a career of this thing before long.”

 and on Facebook

Corey LaJoie to drive for Go Fas Racing

Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images
1 Comment

Corey LaJoie will race full time in 2019 for Go Fas Racing in the No. 32 Ford, the team announced on Thursday at the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

“I’ve always respected Archie (St. Hilaire), Mason (St. Hilaire) and everyone at Go Fas Racing because they are constantly building their race team better every year,” LaJoie said in a release. “I’m glad to be part of that continued growth for 2019 and look forward to getting on track and being in a position to show more of my potential.

“The most success in my career has been behind the wheel of a Ford from the ARCA and K&N series so I’m ready to jump into that mean looking Ford Mustang this season. Also, some of my best results in the Cup series have been with (crew chief) Randy (Cox) on the box. There couldn’t be a better guy to lead our team!”

LaJoie has 57 previous starts in Cup competition with a career-best 11th at Daytona in the 2017 Coke Zero 400 while driving for BK Racing.

LaJoie has six wins in the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East and three in the ARCA Series.

Last year, Go Fas Racing earned one top 10 – also in the Coke Zero 400. Matt DiBenedetto finished seventh in that event.

“Every year we feel like our program takes a step forward and securing Corey should help us continue to move that direction,” Go Fas Racing general manager Mason St. Hilaire said in a release. “We’ve learned and grown a lot in our time in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series, and I believe our results reflect that growth.

“We’re very excited about the potential our team has this year. Every year we’ve been able to improve our program in different areas, and we fully believe that this coming season will be no different. Corey is a driver we’ve kept our eyes on for several years, and he’s impressed and delivered when given the opportunity. We think he’s a great fit for our program and can’t wait to get this season under way.”

Go Fas Racing is using a charter from the No. 33 Circle Sport team.

St. Hilaire said the team still has 10 races of sponsorship to fill.

Go Fas Racing has also partnered with Team Penske to use one of its pit crews.

Follow Dan Beaver on Twitter

 

 

Go Fas Racing secures charter by partnering with Circle Sport Racing

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Go Fas Racing has secured a charter for Matt DiBenedetto’s No. 32 Ford by partnering with Circle Sport Racing.

The move comes after Go Fas Racing’s owner Archie St. Hilaire entered into a partnership with the Wood Brothers that allowed the Wood Brothers to retain the charter they leased last year from Go Fas Racing.

That move left Go Fas Racing without a charter. That matter was resolved with the partnership with Circle Sport Racing car owner Joe Falk, who recently split with TMG.

“This deal pretty much fills our plate for the 2018 season,” St. Hilaire said in a statement from the team. “We decided that the best long-term strategy for GFR’s original charter was to strike a deal with our good friends at Wood Brothers Racing, which left us seeking a charter for our own No. 32 car. I think this partnership with Joe Falk is mutually beneficial for both Joe and ourselves going into the future. Joe has been in the business for a long time and will add a wealth of knowledge to our programs in 2018 and beyond.”

Said Falk in a statement: “We have been talking about doing this for over a year and it was a big decision to switch to Ford, but we believe it will pay off. This is a performance business and we have not had the team to get good finishes. We are also working on running the No. 33 car in select events with young drivers such as Joey Gase to help get them prepared for a full Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series season going forward.”

CHARTERS THAT HAVE CHANGED TEAMS FOR 2018

— Furniture Row Racing #77 charter sold to JTG Daugherty for No. 37 car

— Roush Fenway Racing #16 charter sold to Team Penske for No. 12 car

— Richard Petty Motorsports #43 charter leased to Rick Ware Racing for No. 51 car

— Wood Brothers Racing forms long-term partnership with Go Fas Racing owner Archie St. Hilaire that grants Wood Brothers full operating control of the No. 32 team’s charter it leased last year.

— Go Fas Racing forms partnership with Circle Sport Racing owner Joe Falk for his charter for the No. 32 team.

 and on Facebook

Wood Brothers playoff run could be worth $1 million to another Cup team

Getty Images
2 Comments

JOLIET, Illinois — Car owner Archie St. Hilaire is nine weeks away from what could be a $1 million payout after winning the equivalent of the NASCAR lottery.

When Ryan Blaney won at Pocono in June to make the playoffs, it wasn’t just the Wood Brothers who celebrated. Although Matt DiBenedetto finished 32nd for St. Hilaire’s team that day, St. Hilaire says he was “hooting and hollering’’ when Blaney held off Kevin Harvick to win.

A victory for the Wood Brothers also was a victory for St. Hilaire’s team.

Go Fas Racing benefits because it leased its charter to the Wood Brothers before the season — something teams can do once in a five-year period.

The decision to lease the charter before this season was easy for St. Hilaire. Any team that finishes in the bottom three among charter teams for three consecutive years can lose its charter to NASCAR. Last year, Go Fas Racing finished in the bottom three among charter teams.

“I think NASCAR is pretty serious of the bottom three and you’re out,’’ St. Hilaire told NBC Sports at Chicagoland Speedway. “The marketability of one being in the bottom three two years in a row probably decreases. The first year, you’re the negotiator and the second year, they’re the negotiator and you’re trying to bail out to not be in the bottom three.’’

When St. Hilaire partnered with the Wood Brothers, he admits he thought about the extra money he could receive if the Wood Brothers made the playoffs.

Charters fund Cup teams in four different ways. There’s money for entering each event, race purse, points fund and historical performance.

St. Hilaire says his team received less than $100,000 last year from the historical category. He says that total could be close to $1 million based on how well Blaney does in the playoffs. Blaney is 10th after the first of three races in the opening round. The top 12 advance to the second round.

“I’m rooting for them,’’ St. Hilaire said of Blaney and the Wood Brothers.

For a team with about a budget of about $5.5 million, adding $1 million could increase the budget by nearly 20 percent.

“That’s all funds that we’ll use to race in the future and make us a better team,’’ said St. Hilaire, whose team ranks 33rd in the owner standings heading into Sunday’s race at New Hampshire Motor Speedway (2 p.m. ET on NBCSN).

The better Blaney does in the playoffs, the more valuable the charter becomes.

St. Hilaire, though, must decide what to do with the charter when it is returned after this season. He could keep it and take the money. Or he could sell the charter since it is worth more with the increase in the historical category.

There are a few teams that could be candidates for charters. The Wood Brothers won’t have one for next season after returning their charter to Go Fas Racing. Also, Team Penske will expand to a third car for Blaney and could use a charter. Already, JTG Daugherty has purchased a charter for the No. 37 of Chris Buescher for next season after leasing a charter from Roush Fenway Racing this year.

Should St. Hilaire sell his charter, he’ll lease one like he did this season. After leasing his charter to the Wood Brothers, St Hilaire leased a charter from Richard Petty Motorsports.

There could be many other options for St. Hilarie to lease charters next year.

“I just don’t see that being too hard to find,’’ St. Hilaire said. “We’re talking to about four people. They’re available.’’

He also said he would consider acquiring two charters to run a second team provided a driver can bring funding to the team.

Whatever St. Hilaire does with the charter, he knows what he wants to do with the expected extra money.

“We don’t even have an engineering package,’’ St. Hilaire said. “We’re checking old-fashioned tire temps, spring rates. Matt does a great job. (Crew chief Gene Nead) does a great job. That would be our next step, to get engineering help.’’

 and on Facebook

Matt DiBenedetto to return to Go Fas Racing in 2018

Photo by Brian Lawdermilk/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Matt DiBenedetto and crew chief Gene Nead have each agreed to a contract extension that will keep them at Go Fas Racing through next season, the team announced Saturday morning.

Both DiBenedetto and Nead joined the team before this season after working the previous two seasons together at BK Racing.

“I couldn’t be happier to sign this deal with Go Fas and the St. Hilaire family,” DiBenedetto said in a statement from the team. “Being involved in this family operation has been so much fun and we get a lot of pride out of improving their program together. Everything that they said they were going to do to our program, they did. It’s great to work with people who say they want to improve and do just that.
“Working with Gene for another season, and especially over the offseason, will allow us to rebuild some of our cars, get ahead on the 2018 season, and really make the most out of our team. Gene is one of the most intelligent guys in the garage area and is respected industry-wide. He knows how to make our cars faster with just about any budget. We already have great partners on board, and hopefully we can continue to add even more to show just how good we really can be.”
DiBenedetto, who is in his third season in Cup, is 31st in the points. He finished a season-best eighth at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. He placed ninth in the Daytona 500.

“I’m really happy to have Matt and Gene back next season,” car owner Archie St. Hilaire said in a statement. “We have improved overall by seven spots from last year, and we’re looking forward to picking up a couple more spots before the end of this season. Hopefully we’ll be working our way into the top 25 in 2018 with more help from existing and new sponsorship. All of the guys at Go Fas have worked their butts off this year at the shop and on the road and it’s really showing. We appreciate all the hard work they’ve put in this year.”

 and on Facebook