NASCAR America: Daniel Suarez’s success in All-Star Race provides 600 confidence

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The rules package used in last week’s All-Star Race did not provide technical assistance to any of the teams since it will not be implemented for this week’s Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway, but Daniel Suarez gained more from his second-place finish in it than perhaps anyone else, according to the NASCAR America analysts on Tuesday.

Racing at NASCAR’s top level takes confidence that can only be earned with success.

“I don’t think a lot applies from a technical standpoint, but I think that momentum is important,” Jeff Burton said. “Daniel Suarez got moved up to the Cup series probably a year before they really wanted him to with Carl Edwards’ departure.

“He still is playing catch up a little bit. And that’s OK. He’s a young driver, he has time to catch up, but at some point you’ve got to have some success. … I think for Daniel, this race was exceptionally important because it reminded him he can drive a race car. Reminded him what it feels like to battle for the win.”

Suarez finished 11th in last year’s Coke 600 and finished sixth in the fall Bank of America 500.

“Daniel’s going to get a lot from the All-Star Race going into the 600,” Landon Cassill said. “Maybe because of his experience and because he’s a sophomore driver, he might get more out of it than Kyle Busch or Kevin Harvick. Getting those reps in and restarting next to Kevin Harvick … racing side-by-side with those guys. More so than just the confidence. There are actual things that Daniel learned on Saturday night that is going to help him for the Coke 600.

For more, watch the above video.

Scan All: “It’s crazy what you guys’ll do for a million bucks”

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“It’s crazy what you guys’ll do for a million bucks,” crew chief Todd Gordon told his driver after Joey Logano narrowly missed a multicar accident In the All-Star Race.

“You just wait. You’ll see a lot more of that,” Logano replied.

Here are some other highlights:

  • “Beside the 4, I think we’ve got the best car; it’s driving pretty good.” – Kyle Busch
  • “We’re tore up. Lost the hood.” – Brad Keselowski
  • “I just want to thank my teammate Clint Bowyer for putting us in that position.” – Kurt Busch
  • “He’s the last one to do that because he mirror drives everybody.” – Kyle Larson, after contact from Logano sent him spinning.
  • “That 22’s probably going to be our next caution. I think he’s gonna cut a tire, personally.” – Chase Elliott
  • “A million dollars baby. Hell yeah!” – Kevin Harvick

For more, watch the above video.

NASCAR America: Jeff Burton says ‘NASCAR took a big swing with new aero package’

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In a poll during Monday’s NASCAR America segment, fans overwhelmingly supported the new aero package used in the All-Star Race. Analyst Jeff Burton was one of those who voted yes to the question of whether it should be used again this year.

And yet, Burton also was cautious about this being the final version NASCAR employs.

“There’s going to have to be a way where maybe you can put more power in the cars and still give them the ability to draft,” Burton said.

“This was a big swing. Maybe something in the middle makes the most sense. The mile-and-half races, quite frankly they’ve got to be a little better than they have been. And this is the beginning of doing that.”

NASCAR is made up of many stakeholders, and the drivers’ opinions are weighed alongside the fans.

“You could tell (the drivers) were kind of surprised they liked it,” Burton continued.

“You could hear them hesitantly saying, ‘Yeah, I kind of liked it,’ but they were afraid to admit it because it wasn’t what they really want to do.”

Burton said the reason for the hesitation was that the restrictor plate and aero ducts altered the input the drivers have on their race cars.

“There’s going to have to be common ground where maybe you can put more power back in the cars and still give them the ability to draft,” Burton said. “Now that’s going to be hard to do. … How can we do that and make the car go faster? That’s the next question. If we can find a way to put some speed back into the cars and give the guy in second an advantage somewhere, that’s the positive you can take from this race and keep building that book.

“The end goal being create racing that’s fun to watch but doesn’t mess with the tradition and all the things that NASCAR has always been. There’s a way to do it if the effort continues.”

For more on Burton’s take, watch the video above.

NASCAR America: 2018 All-Star Race is a fundamental change for NASCAR

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The 2018 All-Star Race represented a fundamental change in NASCAR’s approach to racing and it is going to take some time to decide its implications.

Opinions were mixed when NASCAR first announced a rules package for this year’s All-Star Race similar to the one used last year in the Xfinity Series at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. After seeing it in action with the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series cars, refinement is needed, but the direction is good, according the NASCAR America analyst Jeff Burton.

“This is a fundamental change in what racing has always been about and how you drive a race car,” Burton said Monday. “It is a major change. We heard some of the drivers talk about it: ‘Good’, ‘Bad’. I think the majority of the fan interaction was really good. But I don’t think it’s as easy as saying this is what we need to do all the time.”

The package tightened the field and provided action throughout the field.

Burton described some of the race action: “We see Martin Truex Jr. with the lead. Kyle Busch with people behind him turns left and is going to be able to clear him right here. And that’s what I want to see. I want to see that kind of racing. And, by the way, the racing behind the lead is fascinating. What are you doing to put yourself in a position to have a chance to get to the lead?”

For more, watch the above video.

Winning becoming same old, same old for Kevin Harvick

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Winning is never mundane for a Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series driver, but it’s starting to look that way for Kevin Harvick.

After winning Saturday night’s All-Star Race, Harvick walked into the media center at Charlotte Motor Speedway notably subdued, which prompted a question regarding his seeming lack of enthusiasm.

“I got a 4-month old baby at home,” he said. “I showed up this morning. I held my little girl at, I don’t know, 7:30, 8 a.m. I drove to the race track. I practiced. I went back, watched my son’s baseball game. I drove back for the drivers meeting. I had four appearances. I sat and laid on the couch for an hour, watched the race. Then I came back out and did driver intros, ran the race.

“If your ass wouldn’t be tired by now, I don’t know who you are. But I’m beat. I felt like I gave it a full effort today. If I’m subdued, I’m sorry. I’m really happy that we won the race. I’m really excited for my team and organization and sponsors and everybody. But I’m tired. Got to remember, I’m old. When I leave here, I’m going to go home, I drink too many more of these Busch beers, I might be asleep in the car.”

Before he hauled his tired butt into the media center, Harvick did something no one thought possible in 2018. He drove away from the field in the All-Star Race with a new rules package that was supposed to keep that from happening.

In a race marked by a substantial amount of passing throughout the field, Harvick took the lead from Ricky Stenhouse Jr. on Lap 6 and built a sizable lead in the first of four stages.

After losing positions during the pit stop at the end of the first stage, Harvick had to fight his way through traffic and did not regain the lead until near the end of the third stage.

“Hey, everything’s going our way,” Harvick said. “We have really fast cars. Everybody is executing. The pit crew didn’t have a great first stop with the tire getting hung in the fender, but they rebounded with a great pit stop on the next stop and gained a spot or two there. That’s what you want out of an experienced team, whether it’s the pit crew, the crew chief, the driver. When something goes wrong, you got to be able to overcome it, refocus, move forward.”

It was Harvick’s sixth win of the year, and although it was a non-points event, it marks the second time this season that he has won three consecutive races – putting another stamp on his claim to be the most dominant driver on a weekly basis.

The trick to success is not to allow winning to become mundane – no matter how it looks to the competition or the fans.

“It’s racing like you’re losing,” Harvick said after winning his second career All-Star Race. “If you can trick yourself into doing that every week, not get too high during the highs, really feel like you need to keep pushing to make things better, that’s really the mindset that everybody has right now.”

It might be easy to dismiss his current string of success in the belief that Harvick, crew chief Rodney Childers and the No. 4 team have found something through the first 12 races of 2018 that everyone else is missing. And while that may be partially true in terms of his success in points paying races, that element was missing from his All-Star victory.

The commonality between Harvick’s win Saturday night and the five points victories so far this year is the dedication and experience of the team – something that predates 2018.

“I don’t feel like that’s really a different position than we’ve been in four out of the five last years,” Harvick said. “Last year was obviously a building year for us. I think that’s the one thing that is the great part about this team, is we’ve been in a position to obviously win the championship in 2014. ’15 had a great year, won a bunch of races. We’ve been in position to have been successful before. I think that the experience of the team and the organization and all the racers that come into that shop day after day kind of sets the tone of the expectations, but also having been in a lot of these situations before with each other.

“I’m proud of them all. That to me is more important than the money and everything that comes with it because everybody puts so much time with it. There’s nothing better than seeing them all high-five in Victory Lane.”

Two weeks after taking home one of NASCAR’s most distinctive trophies – a concrete Miles the Monster holding a diecast replica of the No. 4 car for is AAA 400 win – Harvick was excited to give his son Keelan another piece of art for his playroom.

“Man, I like the trophy, to tell you the truth. I’ll take the money, for sure. All the kids think it’s Lightning McQueen’s Piston Cup. I’m sure that’s (what) mine will think about it when he wakes up and sees it in the morning.”

Harvick’s son was impressed, but he is beginning to reassess his priorities. After waking up the morning after Kevin’s $1 million win, Keelan said “cool trophy where’s the money?”