Kevin Harvick expects more suspensions for Rodney Childers; unrepentant about penalty

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A postrace penalty after his victory at Texas Motor Speedway cost Kevin Harvick his crew chief for the final two races of the 2018 season.

But the punishment won’t be a deterrent: Harvick fully expects he will be thrust into a situation without Rodney Childers again.

“It better not be the last time that he gets suspended because I just don’t think you are pushing it hard enough if you’re not,” Harvick said Tuesday night during his “Happy Hours” show on SiriusXM’s NASCAR channel. “That’s part of racing. Not something I’m going to apologize for at any point in my career just because of the fact I want my crew chief doing what he has to do to make my car go as fast as he can. Try to work within the rules and find the gray area you can and win some and lose some.”

Childers was benched for mounting an illegal spoiler on the No. 4 Ford at Texas, which was the eighth and final win of a career season for Harvick. The infraction was discovered during a midweek inspection at the R&D Center in Concord, North Carolina, and NASCAR stripped the championship benefits of the win.

The Stewart-Haas Racing driver dominated NASCAR’s Loop Data statistics, finishing first in driver rating, fastest laps, fastest on restarts, laps led and green-flag speed.

Harvick also ranked first with 1,990 laps led — the third time in five seasons with Childers that he has topped that category.

During a 2017 episode of the NASCAR on NBC Podcast, Childers said the team’s speed had led to many trips to the R&D Center for extra scrutiny in 2014-15.

Childers lamented the team choosing to back off in practice and qualifying in 2016 to avoid NASCAR attention.

But on Tuesday’s show, Harvick said the attention — and sometimes resulting penalties — were a good thing.

“It’s not going to be the last time my crew chief gets suspended,” Harvick said. “That’s just part of what we do, and if you’re going to be one of the good teams, you’re going to have to push the limits. You’re going to have to be on the verge of getting in trouble all the time.

“You have to push the envelope.”

Podcast: NASCAR president hears short tracks’ ‘fairly strong drumbeat’

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Not long after he was announced as NASCAR’s fifth president in September, Steve Phelps received some advice on Twitter about future changes to the sport’s schedule.

The Twitter user told Phelps, “Hey, let me help you out. More short tracks, more road courses.”

Phelps recounted the message to Nate Ryan on the latest NASCAR on NBC podcast.

“I think he gave me his address so I could send him a check,” Phelps said. “There was an expletive in there. It was all good.”

A significant portion of the episode was dedicated to potential changes to the NASCAR schedule in 2020.

Phelps, who has been with NASCAR since 2005 and came from the NFL, said “everything is on the table” from midweek races, more short tracks and moving the schedule forward on the calendar to end the season earlier.

Phelps said there’s “a fairly strong drumbeat” from NASCAR’s 25,000-member fan council for more short tracks, he added the “absolute truth” is that he has “no idea” what the schedule could morph into in two years (the 2019 Cup slate was announced in April).

“I think that there is a willingness among tracks and teams and NASCAR and our broadcast partners to look at things in a different way,” Phelps said. “I do think that the Roval opened up some eyes. I think much like what you saw around the first race at Eldora (Speedway in 2013), that first truck race on dirt … everybody was like ‘We have to have more, we have to have more dirt races.’

“I think you have to look at, ‘OK, what’s the specialness of it?’ I’m not suggesting there wouldn’t be another Roval, I’ll put that in quotes, moving forward. But I think there are changes to the schedule, there have been things that have been tossed around and around. Can you have a doubleheader weekend? Can you have a midweek race? Can you pull the schedule forward? Does it make sense to go to a street course or go to more short tracks?”

What about a doubleheader weekend with IndyCar, which will be televised exclusively by NBC Sports Group next season?

“I don’t know. Potential,” Phelps said. “I think that there’s synergy from the motorsports side from a broadcast standpoint. (NBC Sports Executive Producer) Sam Flood (said) he’s going to do a motorsports summit to try to look at some best practices and are there ways we can cross promote. I think it’s fantastic.”

During the podcast, Phelps also discusses:

— His roots as a childhood race fan in Vermont;

— How “geotargeting” fans works with increasing ticket sales;

— His approach to Twitter and how active he plans to be in his role

To listen to the NASCAR on NBC Podcast, click on the embed above, or you can download the episodes at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts.

Mike Wells set to direct final NASCAR race for NBC Sports

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For the last four Labor Day weekends, each visit to Darlington Raceway on “Throwback Weekend” has been a trip down memory lane for NASCAR.

Especially for the man who has helped oversee packaging and presenting some of the most indelible images in stock-car racing over the past four decades.

“During the (Southern 500) broadcasts, we play back historic races of Darlington, and I’m going, ‘Oh yup, I did that one, and yeah, I did that one,’” Mike Wells, who is in his 38th season of directing NASCAR races, said recently with a chuckle. “One of the most memorable races – and there’s a number of them – but Bill Elliott was the first one to get the Winston Million and I directed that one, and that was a pretty cool thing. There’s just so many different ones, quite frankly.”

Sunday’s Cup race at Talladega Superspeedway on NBC will mark the last chance for the 21-time Emmy Award winner to leave his stamp on creating NASCAR memories as he closes a run that began in 1981 at Rockingham Speedway.

Wells said he has lost precise count of how many hundreds of races he has directed since then, but he estimates snapping his fingers – his signature method of calling for a camera change – several hundred thousand times in production trucks at racetracks around the country.

That distinct rhythm will move to another racing circuit next year as NBC Sports takes over full coverage of the IndyCar Series, and Wells directs the Indianapolis 500 and other select races.

“Mike’s contributions to NBC Sports and NASCAR during the past 37 seasons have been immeasurable,” said Sam Flood, executive producer for NBC Sports. “His legacy as an Emmy Award-winning director and innovator in the sport is second only to his reputation as a tremendous teammate, leader and mentor to so many who have had the privilege of working with him.

“While it’s bittersweet for this to be Mike’s final NASCAR race for us, we can’t think of a better person to direct NBC’s inaugural Indy 500 in 2019.”

Fittingly, Talladega has been the site for much of Wells’ most memorable race direction in NASCAR.

He was selecting the camera angles for the May 4, 1986 race that began with a fan stealing the pace car. Wells was in the production truck a year later at Talladega when rookie Davey Allison scored his first Cup victory and was congratulated in victory lane by his father, Bobby, whose car had flown into the frontstretch catchfence earlier in the race and caused nearly a 3-hour delay (NASCAR instituted restrictor plates the following season).

Wells also was at Talladega to frame the Oct. 15, 2000 dash by Dale Earnhardt from 18th to first in the final five laps of the last victory of his career.

The Nov. 15, 1992 season finale at Atlanta Motor Speedway – which marked Alan Kulwicki winning the championship in the final race of Richard Petty and the debut of Jeff Gordon – also was directed by Wells.

“Again, it was just really special to be a part of that whole thing,” said Wells, who also takes pride in directing the first Daytona 500 win, Brickyard 400 victory and championship for Jimmie Johnson during the ’06 season. He also worked Johnson’s seventh championship in the Nov. 20, 2016 season finale at Homestead Miami Speedway.

Wells said it’s tough to pick a favorite track, but he can recall many of their special moments, such as Tony Stewart’s July 2, 2005 win at Daytona International Speedway.

“He climbed up in the flagstand, and we had a camera there, and the fireworks were going off behind him,” Wells said. “My job is to capture the moments, and that was a moment.”

Raised in Milwaukee (where his house was a few miles from a speedway, and he could hear the cars on weekends), Wells’ introduction to race direction came at Eldora Speedway in 1980 when he spent time with track founder Earl Baltes during a camera survey.

“That’s kind of how I really got interested in racing, and a year later, I’m doing NASCAR,” said Wells, who was hired by NASCAR Hall of Famer Ken Squier to direct his first race. “It was pretty cool.”

Technology has changed markedly in the interim with Wells chuckling as he recalls team members once helping carry the cables on handheld cameras used to cover pit stops (they are now wireless).

Back then, just the cable for a camera was four times the size, and quite frankly, you were limited by the length of the cable or you started losing picture,” Wells said. “So now you can go an indefinite amount of miles because of the fiber. That’s probably one of the biggest technical achievements. Certainly the in-car cameras and the robocams and the BatCams, those kind of things, really are huge. It was tough getting in and out of the pit area with them tied to a cable.”

In the past two seasons, Wells also has been pleased by the positive impact on race production by the addition of stages “because you’re guaranteed restarts and now you actually get less green-flag commercials because those commercials are built in during the caution. So the fan at home actually gets to see more green-flag racing than they would have in the past.”

While he largely is responsible for what fans see as a race director, Wells constantly credits his co-workers for the quality of the broadcasts that typically involve a crew of more than 100 people.

He recently was touched when a former longtime camera operator on his crew drove from Phoenix to Las Vegas last month just to visit for an evening with Wells before he directed his last playoff opener.

“You just can’t beat that,” Wells said. “It’s such a close-knit family anyway. I keep saying we’re like a traveling gypsy show, and we are. You just feel so proud that someone would take the time to do that.”

You can hear Wells recount his career during a 2016 episode of the NASCAR on NBC Podcast by listening below or via Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify or Google Play.

Podcast: Justin Allgaier’s health scare and ‘best thing I’ve ever done’

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DOVER, Del. – After a career season, Justin Allgaier is facing potential elimination today at Dover International Speedway just three races into the Xfinity Series playoffs.

The JR Motorsports driver undoubtedly would be supremely disappointed by such a stunning turn of events, but he also has already experienced adversity that would help put that in perspective.

During a trip to Spain for a sponsor event at the Formula One race in Barcelona, Allgaier lost nearly 20 pounds in a few days, falling so ill he wondered if he’d be well enough to fly home.

Doctors recommended a colonoscopy, a test usually done on men older than 50. Allgaier, 32, was fortunate it turned up negative for cancer but also glad that it eliminated lingering doubts.

“Getting a colonoscopy at 32 years old is really weird,” he said on the most recent episode of the NASCAR on NBC Podcast. “You walk in and almost feel out of place. I’m going to tell you right now it’s the best thing I’ve ever done. Because it took every bit of question out of my mind.

“And I tell people all the time, between family and friends, I’ve had a lot of people that have had different types of cancers, different types of diseases, things that have ultimately been life-threatening. We see Sherry Pollex every weekend and what she promotes and has gone through, but I don’t think people sometimes … they’ll talk about something whenever it doesn’t affect them. But when it affects you, you’re always a lot of times like I’m not saying a word. I’m just going to keep to myself and do my thing, it’ll go away eventually. Nothing’s wrong. I’ve lost too many people in my life to worry about how weird it’s going to be or what it looks like from the outside.”

“My thing has been if I can go and get a test, and I can get an answer, why wouldn’t you? It was weird. I felt a little out of place, but it was the best thing I’ve ever done.”

Allgaier, who is 11 points ahead of the current cutoff after winning the regular-season championship with five victories, said he hasn’t had any lingering effects since returning from Spain, and that doctors have ruled out “anything that I have to be worried about.

“There’s still some question marks, but ultimately we’ve checked off 98% of the stuff that is big-item stuff that could have been a lot worse than what it is, so I’m feeling pretty good about where I am at the moment,” he said.

During the podcast, Allgaier also discusses:

–The special helmet designed for the playoffs by his 5-year-old daughter;

–The influence of his grandfather, a D-Day veteran;

–Being miserable during his two-season stint in the Cup Series.

To listen to the NASCAR on NBC Podcast, click on the embed above, or you can download the episodes at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts.

 

Podcast: Mario Andretti and the rare car he requested for the Roval

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CONCORD, N.C. – What would it take to put a racing legend behind the wheel on Charlotte Motor Speedway’s new road course?

For Mario Andretti, it was fulfilling a simple request: A high-performance car with a highly limited production run.

Fortunately, Speedway Motorsports Inc. CEO Marcus Smith’s family is in the business of selling cars as well as racing them, so procuring a 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder Hybrid was easier than it might have been for many.

“My brother happened to have one,” Smith said on this week’s episode of the NASCAR on NBC Podcast. “Listen, that is crazy. I haven’t driven that car. I’m afraid to drive that car. It’s a $1 million car. They only made 918 of them.

“I said, ‘I’m not driving but I’ll check.’ My brothers both said, ‘Yeah, let’s do it. Mario!’ ”

Andretti, a veteran of famous road courses around the world as a 1978 Formula One champion (as well as a winner of the Indianapolis 500 and Daytona 500, the only driver to capture all three), toured the Roval in a March 2017 session. According to the track, Andretti reached a top speed at 177 mph in the 887-horsepower car.

“My brother David rode along with Mario which was extremely brave and crazy at the same time,” Smith said. “David made the mistake of asking Mario not to push too hard, which he did the opposite. This is just a super car. Before he drove it, Mario said, ‘I’ll drive it and give you feedback. If I like it, I’ll tell everybody else. If I don’t, I won’t tell anybody but you.’”

The track earned a seal of approval from Andretti, who told Smith the course was much better than he’d anticipated (“he was really surprised by the elevation changes and the camber in the turns”) and also offered two pieces of advice:

–An enhanced infield camping area because “that’s what all the great road courses in Europe have. An area where all the fans are right in the middle, and it makes it a lot more fun,” Smith said Andretti told him. The track has added pedestrian walkover bridges to provide more vantage points on the 17-turn, 2.28-mile layout.

–A chicane on the backstretch to reduce speeds. That was added after Cup drivers confirmed Andretti’s suggestion in other test sessions last year. “Mario said, ‘You’re going too fast,’” Smith said. “I said, ‘You sound like a driver!’ He said, ‘No, you need that chicane.’ That was in my mind.

“And we came back from testing and they said if we don’t have a chicane, we’ll make the tires so hard that it won’t be good on the infield road course, which may not be the best choice. We added the chicane, which works out fine, allows more competitive passing and you get another passing point on the track.”

During the podcast, Smith also discusses:

–The origins of moving the fall race at Charlotte Motor Speedway’s 1.5-mile oval to a road course;

–his reactions to Cup drivers feeling daunted by the layout;

–why he believes road courses are the new short tracks.

To listen to the NASCAR on NBC Podcast, click on the embed above, or you can download the episodes at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Play or wherever you get your podcasts.