Scan All: “It’s crazy what you guys’ll do for a million bucks”

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“It’s crazy what you guys’ll do for a million bucks,” crew chief Todd Gordon told his driver after Joey Logano narrowly missed a multicar accident In the All-Star Race.

“You just wait. You’ll see a lot more of that,” Logano replied.

Here are some other highlights:

  • “Beside the 4, I think we’ve got the best car; it’s driving pretty good.” – Kyle Busch
  • “We’re tore up. Lost the hood.” – Brad Keselowski
  • “I just want to thank my teammate Clint Bowyer for putting us in that position.” – Kurt Busch
  • “He’s the last one to do that because he mirror drives everybody.” – Kyle Larson, after contact from Logano sent him spinning.
  • “That 22’s probably going to be our next caution. I think he’s gonna cut a tire, personally.” – Chase Elliott
  • “A million dollars baby. Hell yeah!” – Kevin Harvick

For more, watch the above video.

Ryan: The All-Star Race was good but hold your horsepower on using those restrictor plates again

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CONCORD, N.C. – It took 2 minutes for Kyle Busch to climb from his battered No. 18 Toyota and walk roughly a hundred feet to the side door of his team hauler.

The entirety of the trip (with some prompting) was spent pondering what he just witnessed in Saturday night’s All-Star Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway.

“I’ll have to see it, I guess, to look at it to see if it’s a good show, but (I’m) not a fan,” Busch told NBCSports.com.

Why not?

“When the fastest guy gets out front, he’s supposed to be able to have an opportunity to be fast,” Busch said. “Now when you get the fastest guy out front, he backs up to the rest of the field. So everybody’s always on top of one another, and when you get back in the pack, you can’t pass anybody.

“It’s a restrictor-plate race.”

But with one important caveat: Unlike a plate race, passing the leader (aside from on restarts) seemed extremely difficult Saturday night.

“I was out front, and yeah, those guys couldn’t get by me,” said Busch, who was one of three drivers to lead at least 15 consecutive laps during the 93-lap event. “And I couldn’t pass whoever was in front of me when I finished third in the first stage. So I don’t know that it’s greater.”

Was it greater?

That has been the crux of the fever-pitched debates occurring within the NASCAR industry since the checkered flag fell on one of the more memorable All-Star Races in recent history and (not coincidentally) the Charlotte debut of restrictor plates and aero ducts.

At a 1.5-mile superspeedway whose ultra grippy pavement (despite 12 years of age) produces high speeds without much tire wear, the brand of racing was eye-popping and distinctive. Breakaways by the leader were nonexistent. Dicing for positions within the pack was incessant.

But were things much different at the front?

Harvick took the lead from Kyle Larson on the second-to-last restart and led the final 11 laps. Aside from the last restart, Harvick’s No. 4 Ford hardly was challenged despite virtually the entire top 10 running within just over a second of first.

It was the 10th time in the past 15 All-Star Races that there hasn’t been a lead change in the final 10 laps.

And this was applicable beyond Harvick’s untouchable car, which has been in victory lane for three consecutive race weekends and is the odds-on favorite again Sunday night in the Coca-Cola 600. Busch led for 19 consecutive laps (nearly the entire second stage), and Martin Truex Jr. paced 15 straight circuits in the middle of the third stage.

Virtually all of the passing occurred within a few laps of a restart. When the leader got out front, he wasn’t going to be caught unless there was a mistake – which doesn’t happen often with drivers the caliber of Harvick, Larson and Truex.

That’s why the 0.7-second lead Harvick built toward the end of the first 30-lap segment felt as if it were 7 seconds. The artifice of this rules package is that it can keep the cars more clumped together, but passing the leader remains as challenging as before (perhaps even more so).

Though Larson admitted (reluctantly) to liking the rules package, the Chip Ganassi Racing driver also tempered his praise.

“I don’t love it,” Kyle Larson told NBCSports.com. “I don’t love it. I thought the racing was definitely more exciting than it typically is here at Charlotte. I’d hate for them to get carried away with it and make us run it at every intermediate (track). I still don’t think the runs were quite as big as what we were all hoping for, the pocket of air or the slingshot or whatever you want to call it. We all could stay fairly close together and run off the back bumpers a little bit easier. I feel that made the racing a little bit better.

“Still, once a fast car gets out to the lead, it’s pretty hard to pass if they do a good job maintaining lanes. So, yeah, I don’t know if we can take this package and give it more horsepower, but I think they could tweak on it and make it even better for (Charlotte).”

There were some track executives who were ready to sign up for running the aero package everywhere starting this weekend. That’s understandable given that there’s been a decade-long push within NASCAR to enhance side-by-side action, which definitely was delivered by this combination in its first race.

But some perspective would be wise.

When a low-downforce rules package made its July 11, 2015 debut at Kentucky Speedway, it was a smashing success – and in conditions similar to Saturday night. In both cases, teams had no real-world testing and little chance to prepare beyond simulations and wind tunnels. The efficacy of the lower downforce package in producing nonstop lead changes and passes faded as teams grew acclimated.

Was Saturday something to build on? Of course.

Something to implement immediately at every 1.5-mile oval? Of course not.

The All-Star Race provided the kernel of a concept that could work at other superspeedways in the future, provided there is some tweaking (specifically, at the front of the pack) and probably some major buy-in from teams.

But it isn’t some magic elixir that can be applied like a fresh coat of traction compound to any track seeking a jolt.


There is danger in listening too much to what drivers want, but this package has an element of socialized racing that could have stars rethinking their careers if it becomes widespread.

Though there is some skill in plate racing, and Saturday night didn’t remove all ability from the equation, mastering the modulation of 800 horsepower with limited downforce is what separates the wheat from the chaff in NASCAR’s premier series.

As Kyle Busch said in April and reiterated this past weekend at Charlotte, racing with underpowered cars in deliberately orchestrated clusters isn’t what attracted him to the Cup Series.

“It’s not necessarily what I signed up for to be a race car driver to bring the whole field closer together and have it dictated by some type of a plate race,” Busch said Friday a day before the All-Star Race. “But if that’s what we’re going to have going forward, then I guess I either need to think about how to get really good at it or getting out of it so we’ll see what happens.”

That isn’t some idle threat. Busch’s lack of affection for plate racing is widely known (and also doesn’t make him unique among his peers). NASCAR offers him the best way to make a living racing on a national stage, but “passion” is a primary motivator for being willing to make a daring pass in a corner at 200-plus mph.

If that passion is diminished by what he perceives as a de-emphasis on his all-world skillset, it would be natural for him to look elsewhere.


Now that teams’ armies of engineers have on-track data to crunch, how would the new package look the next time on track?

Maybe a lot like seven years ago at Talladega Superspeedway and Daytona International Speedway if Team Penske’s hunch is correct. Before realizing it wouldn’t be possible because of handling and speed, Brad Keselowski and Joey Logano planned to tandem-draft Saturday night. Keselowski hinted it still could be possible in the future.

If it were to happen, that would present another dilemma for NASCAR, which legislated tandem drafting out of existence because fans were so vehemently opposed to the strategy.


What tracks should be considered next for the package?

The July 14 race at Kentucky Speedway seems the most obvious choice. It’s owned by Speedway Motorsports Inc., whose president and CEO, Marcus Smith, spearheaded the All-Star Race package. Smith told NBCSports.com’s Dustin Long that Kentucky has worked as an R&D-style race weekend in the past (e.g., the low-downforce package in ’15, the Tire Dragon machine in ’16, various traction compound usages).

Other tracks that might be good candidates: Kansas Speedway, Pocono Raceway, Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Texas Motor Speedway might be trickier since its reconfiguration and repave last year. Kyle Larson said Saturday that the package should be avoided at Chicagoland Speedway. The best way to judge probably would be a detailed debrief between NASCAR, drivers and teams about what was learned Saturday night.

But one absolute non-starter?

Homestead-Miami Speedway. Based on the past four championship finales, there hopefully is a consensus there is nothing “wrong” with that 1.5-mile track.


As of late Monday morning, there apparently weren’t any major overtures by NASCAR or Smith to key members of the Team Owners Council or Race Team Alliance about using the package again.

The charter agreement stipulates that team owners have some say in competition overhauls during the season because they bear the costs that can stretch well into the seven-figure range for the development and retrofitting of their race cars.

The wave of fan enthusiasm from Saturday night likely will make it extremely difficult for owners to parry the momentum of using the rules package again this season, even if it’s a budget-buster for some.

If there is room for compromising, here’s one potential bargain to strike: Tracks that want the rules package this season should agree to direct some of their event revenue to the teams to help defray the costs of the package.


Who is on Alex Bowman’s bad side? Apparently, those who haven’t shown him much respect in his first season with Hendrick Motorsports.

The No. 88 Chevrolet driver made that clear after crashing Saturday night because he refused to lift off the accelerator when challenged by another driver (whom he didn’t name).

“I probably should have lifted because it hurt me more than the guy that ran us like that,” he said. “I’m just frustrated. I feel like these guys have taken advantage of me quite a bit this year, and I’m over lifting for guys. I’m not going to go out of my way to slow myself down to help somebody else out. They would race me the same way I’m just kind of over it.”

Striking the balance between showing deference and being assertive always is difficult for a young driver in a top-tier ride. It might be harder for Bowman because he also is trying to shed the impressions (many likely unfair) that might have been formed by veterans when the 24-year-old drove for a backmarker team in Cup from 2014-15.


Though his pole position was the weekend’s feel-good story, Matt Kenseth didn’t lead a lap Saturday and was a nonfactor after his No. 6 Ford dropped from the top 10 on the eighth lap.

Roush Fenway Racing teammate Ricky Stenhouse Jr. (11th) didn’t fare much better after starting second. “The car drove about the same with this package as it did with the other package and everybody else was just a lot faster,” Stenhouse said. “It was a bummer we couldn’t take that front row start and do something with it. We were kind of a moving roadblock out there.”

While Roush likely didn’t spend as much money and time developing its cars for Saturday’s package as Joe Gibbs Racing or Stewart-Haas Racing probably did, the results are indicative of how much work the team still has to become competitive.

All-Star Race buzz still has many in NASCAR talking

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The rules package and racing in Saturday night’s Monster Energy All-Star Race and Monster Open has many in the sport debating what to do next.

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR chief racing development officer, said Monday on “The Morning Drive” that series officials will meet Wednesday with industry officials to discuss the race and “see where we go from here.”

The Xfinity Series will run a similar package this season at Pocono (June 2), Michigan (June 9) and Indianapolis (Sept. 8) after running it only at Indy last year.

MORE: Transcript of NASCAR’s comments after the All-Star Race

While O’Donnell noted Saturday night that he would “never say never” to running what was used in the All-Star race again later this year in Cup, he said the focus was on 2019 for the package.

Marcus Smith, chief executive officer of Speedway Motorsports Inc., said he would be for running the package in Cup at Kentucky (July 14). Kentucky is the last 1.5-mile track on the schedule before the playoffs begin in September.

“Certainly that track has been a place where R&D for the rest of the sport has happened, and we’d be happy to have it again there,” Smith told NBC Sports about Kentucky. “Any mile-and-a-half track, whether it’s ours or not. My interest is in making the whole sport fantastic, and I think we’ve got great opportunities for that.’’

Car owner Joe Gibbs said after the All-Star Race that more evaluation is needed with the package.

“I think there’s a lot to talk about,” Gibbs told NBC Sports after the race. “I’m sure we’ll make a good decision. Everybody is going to work together. I think (the race) will be something that everybody evaluates and thinks about. I think there’s a lot to it that going forward in the future would be very different. Cars will have a chance to be in the wind tunnel and do all the things that we do with them.”

Todd Gordon, crew chief for Joey Logano, cautioned Monday on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio about a rush to use the package at other tracks immediately.

“You saw the race and as a team member you feel like, wow, there’s something there, but I think we’ve got to be smart about how we roll forward,” he said. “Sometimes that’s going to take more time than I think what our fan base is going to understand, but we’ve got to smart about how we look at this and what we can do with it. I think there’s potential there. If we just implement what we just did, I don’t know if we’re getting all the potential out of it.”

There also was quite a discussion on social media from several in the sport, from spotters and crew chiefs and more, about the racing and what to do next. Here’s what some were saying on Twitter.

 

 

 

 

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Transcript: What NASCAR said about the All-Star Race

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After Kevin Harvick’s victory in the Monster Energy All-Star Race on Saturday night, the focus turned to what NASCAR will do next with the rules package that was used in the race and created closer competition.

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR chief racing development officer, met with the media after the race and talked about the event, what NASCAR saw and what’s next. Here’s what he said:

STEVE O’DONNELL:  From an eye test, we were certainly pleased with what we saw.  I think you’ll hear drivers say directionally there’s some things we can look at.  We agree.  But would certainly say we’ve got to take time to digest what we saw, look at a lot of facts, see where we go from here.

THE MODERATOR:  We’ll open it right up for questions.

Q.  You obviously said there is some tinkering that needs to be done.  What kind of things are you looking at?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I think it’s really premature.  We just got off the racetrack.  It’s even going through the stats.  We haven’t had a chance to look through a lot.

I can throw one out.  We had zero lead changes at the loops last year.  I think we had 38.  That’s more than the last four years.  Pretty good data when you look at that.

You also look at being able to approach the leader, what are some of those challenges we may want to look at.  Certainly from first to tenth throughout the night, much closer.  At the end of the day the best teams and the best drivers are going to go out there and win.  We also saw that tonight.

Q.  Where do you go from here?  What would be the timeline if you wanted to integrate any of these concepts into the 2019 package?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Good question.  I think one of the things in getting to tonight and talking to the industry was we knew going in that we had a lot of data through what Eric did and a lot of CFT data.  Especially with the OEMs, a lot of things to work on.  Didn’t want to push too much with what we do because we didn’t know what we would see on track.

I would say now, directionally you do like some of the things you see, now you’ve got to get together with the industry, debrief like we always do with the race teams, the drivers, certainly listen to the tracks and the fans, then the OEMs, talk about how do we continue to look at this and look at it in a smart way, look at it in an efficient way.

Can’t really put a timetable on it other than we know we have some meetings set up that we’re contingent upon what we saw tonight.  Those will take place, then we’ll try to put a timeline together to look towards 2019.

Q.  For fans who watched tonight’s race and liked it maybe better than a normal mile and a half, would want to know why this can’t be implemented sooner, what would you tell them?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Well, I probably would wait to see that, first of all.  We just got done with the race.

I answered that with Bob.  We have a process in place.  Talk to the industry about what we wanted to do to see if even directionally this was right.  You don’t want to assume that what you put on track is going to be a home run.  We certainly hoped it would be, but there’s certainly some things that you look at that you could tweak if you went this route.

For us, we’ve got to take the time, be smart about this, really look at it, see where we can go from here.  But I think it’s fair to say that this is something we absolutely want to look at.

Q.  Talked to Martin Truex Jr., he said it was very racy.  He liked it, had some ideas obviously.  For you up in the box, you could see it like the rest of the fans, were y’all high-fiving, thinking we’re moving in the right direction here?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  That’s a good question.  I think no, we’re not high-fiving because we got to control ourselves up in the booth.  I think you judge it by the fans.  I think you look down the last 10 laps, everybody is standing up.  Marcus has a suite next to us.  I can say that last year’s All-Star Race was fairly silent.  Don’t know if everybody stood or everybody was even still there, but it was packed.  We heard screaming in the suite next to us.

People were enthused.  I think the one thing, you saw Kevin Harvick go out there and win, and he certainly dominated this year, but you didn’t know who was going to win that race in turn three.  You saw drivers out there competing.  You saw three lead changes in one lap at the end of the third stage.

A lot of drama built in.  For us in race control, I think you look at it and you certainly saw things every lap that you wanted to watch a number of spots on the racetrack.

Q.  Joey Logano mentioned earlier that this is naturally more exciting with everything that’s on the line and no points.  How do you kind of adjust how you view the excitement in this race compared to what you would see if you incorporated this package in an actual points race?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I think if you asked Joey Sunday night at the Coke 600 if he’s going to race just as hard, he is.  We have the best race drivers in the world that are going to go out there and go after it every lap.

This race package, it’s important for people to know, we saw a lot of things even coming into this about this being a superspeedway package.  That’s not the intent.  The intent for us was to really look at taking the best of our short tracks, taking the best of the superspeedways, trying to find that balance where you could bring the cars closer together.  You were not going to see, we didn’t expect to see, pack racing.  We expected the best cars would still win, but we thought they would be running close together.  We saw that tonight.  That was the goal of this.  The goal will be to continue to look at how we can continue to dial that in.

Q.  I understand what you’re saying about lead changes at the loops.  Harvick led the final 10.  It seemed like once the leader got up front, he was harder to catch.  Would that be something you would look to address?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Yeah, no, we’d absolutely look to address that.  You always want to see that.  I think Kyle Busch won the All-Star Race last year by 1.1, 1.2 seconds.  Tenth place was 1.5.  There’s a big difference there.  I think you knew on Lap 7 that Kyle Busch had won the All-Star Race.  I think we all knew that last year.

It was different this year.  But still certainly something when you look at this package, very similar to Indy last year, when you looked at the ability for someone to get up to the leader, then that stall, that is something we want to look at.

I’d go back also to looking at our guys with Eric and the crew.  This was a package really meant for the Indianapolises of the world, Michigans.  We wanted to try this at Charlotte to see what we could learn.  I think that’s part of what we would look at for sure.

Q.  Is it fair to say this package could be used again this season?  Is that in play?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I would never say never, but our intent is we’ve talked coming into this, was to try this here, then really take a deep dive into how do we make this the best package possible for 2019 if we liked what we saw.  Again, it’s still very early.  You all watched the race, we just watched the race as well, so we have to digest a lot of information and see where we go from there.

Q.  I think it’s fair to say bringing this to a mile and a half track compared to Indianapolis, being so flat, this package would behave differently.  Did it behave how you anticipated it coming in here or were there some things you may have been surprised by tonight?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Again, still fairly early.  I asked Eric in our really quick five-minute debrief, I think you’d say yes.  One of the things we looked at even prior to coming here was the wheel force data from the car.  Eric went out and looked at that.  It was almost an exact match for us coming in.  We felt like we were on the right track.  We felt like we’d see what we saw tonight.

I think the question mark was, can you potentially draft, if you got behind the leader, what would happen, could somebody really get away.  We saw a mix of that tonight.  I think it was stage two or maybe even in the open where a bunch of cars got loose but were able to get back up and close to the front.

A lot of things to look at throughout the field.  Could you move from back to front?  What could you do when you were out front?  So we’ll look at all those.  Each track has different characteristics, for sure.  I’d applaud the team for getting us here and really seeing I think the results we hoped we would see on track.

Q.  I saw the Truck race earlier this year in Vegas.  Did that spark some ideas about bringing that pack or closer racing to this track?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  That’s a great question.  I think if you look back to where we were 2013, 2014, we were more of a high downforce package, had a lot of discussions in the garage area about the racing, what we could do.  We chose to go all really low downforce at that point.  That mixture produced some good racing, but some challenges as well.

When we looked at that, one of the things was the speeds at which the cars were going.  If you look at Charlotte, Atlanta, higher speeds usually make it tougher to pass.  There’s usually one groove.

I think the angle we all looked at, certainly at least what I hear from our fan base is, I love the Trucks, Trucks are great.  I don’t really hear anybody talk about the speeds of the Trucks.  They say it’s great racing.  That was the goal tonight, too, is to put on a great race, but also be able to showcase the best drivers.  I think it did accomplish that still early.

But Kevin Harvick winning for us is by no means a negative.  It’s the best team right now.  He went out there and proved it.

Q.  If there is a big buzz off of this race and people did leave excited about what they saw and you want them to come back next week for the Coca-Cola 600 but they’re not going to see the same thing, does that hamstring NASCAR and the track?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I think it’s a fair question, but I’d also say that we’re proud of the race product that we have on track each and every week.  We always look to improve it.  One of the ways that you improve it and you do it in a smart way is to work collectively with the industry to make sure that you have all your bases covered.

The last thing for us to do would be to roll something out with a number of unanswered questions.  That would be the case if we did that.  We’ve got a lot of work to do.  We’ve got a lot of work to do on the garage area to make sure we’re on the right track.  We feel we are.  I want to make sure the OEMs are comfortable with where we’re going, the direction, so we continue to have that fair playing field across the board.

I would say certainly the direction that we saw tonight is one we would like to pursue, but you need to have continuing conversations.  Again, go back and really analyze everything that we saw.  It’s a one hour eye test for us.  We haven’t gotten into all the data as of yet.

Q.  When you woke up this morning, what was your mixture of excitement and nervousness for today, the significance of what you were trying to do today?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  A lot of prayers this morning probably.

You know, a lot of anticipation for the race because I knew how much work went into it, especially from our team.  So was certainly cautiously optimistic, but you never know, all kinds of things to look at.

Really just wanted to see it play out.  Knew that either way we would have a direction from this.  We would know that this is something we want to continue to pursue or we would also know that we collectively tried something and it’s not a direction we want to go.

I think all in all, was excited beginning of the race, honestly was excited throughout the race.  I thought every lap had something to watch out there on the track.

Q.  How many packages do you feel you can have in the sense of if you want to go this route, how many races would you want to use it, or are you looking for something you feel like you can use on short tracks, intermediate tracks, everything but Daytona and Talladega?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Great question.  I think that’s one of the things when we analyze this.  We did a lot of work over the offseason, Bill, Gene, crew, with the engine builders, to look at how could we be more efficient with the engines.  This was not part of that.  When you look at this race, one of the challenges was are we going to create an entirely new engine package.  That is not the intent at all.

If we were to pursue this route, that’s one of the things we’d want to look at, is how do you keep potentially a restricted engine package, then just one other, not go to three different engine packages.  Very similar to the rules for the racecars, what they look like.  You want to be as efficient as you can, but also put on the best racing possible.  That’s something we’ve got to look at and make sure we can limit the number of packages, but certainly make it so that it’s the best racing possible for the race fans.

Q.  When you have these conversations in the future about this race package, what is going to be in terms of how should it put it?  The conversations that will be had in terms of what could work for a Charlotte and Michigan, then thinking what could be something similar that may work for Richmond or Bristol or Martinsville, or even one of the road courses?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I would say it’s fairly simple when you think about all that.  I think the team owners, the tracks and everyone would say the same thing.  If Marcus Smith’s phone is ringing, I got to get to that race, I haven’t been in a while, that’s a good sign.  If NBC and FOX are calling saying that business is good, ratings are good, that’s a good sign.  If you’re seeing more sponsorship inquiries to the race teams, that’s a good sign.  That all comes from race fans speaking up.

If this is something the fans liked, hopefully we’ll hear that.  We’d continue in that direction.  But that’s ultimately how you dial in.  If it’s 36 different packages or if it’s three, you want to end up on the right one.

We believe we can keep it simple with the number of race packages we put together.  We want to be as efficient as possible.  Ultimately it’s about the fans and putting on the best race we can.

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Daniel Suarez powers from Monster Open stage win to All-Star runner-up finish

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CONCORD, North Carolina — Entering the first turn of the overtime finish of Saturday night’s All-Star Race, Daniel Suarez thought he had a chance.

Then the gut feeling he had before the green flag waved proved accurate.

“I knew that two Fords together are dangerous,” Suarez said after finishing second in the race.

Suarez, who had raced his way into the main event by winning Stage 2 in the 50 lap Monster Energy Open, began the overtime restart in second in the inside lane.

Behind him was Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Denny Hamlin.

But in the outside lane was leader Kevin Harvick and fellow Ford driver Joey Logano.

“I was trying to somehow on the radio, obviously that didn’t work, to keep them away from each other,” Suarez said. “Kevin did a good job. I think in the previous restart, he went on the bottom, then he went up top. I think he did the right decision, trying to find the right guy behind him to push him to the lead.

“Denny, like I say, he did a very good job. For whatever reason, we just disconnected. He couldn’t keep moving forward.”

When Hamlin’s push failed and Logano’s succeeded, Harvick pulled ahead of Suarez’s No. 19 Toyota as the field charged down the backstretch.

In a two-lap shootout, no one had a chance.

Until then Suarez thought he “had the car capable to win the race.”

The 26-year-old driver was competing in his second All-Star Race. For the second consecutive year Suarez won a stage in the Open to make the field. He led a race-high 18 laps in addition to his stage win.

Suarez didn’t think the 50 extra laps in the Open offered him any advantage over his competitors in the main event when it came to figuring out how to master the special rules package, which included restrictor plates, a taller spoiler and larger splitter.

“What I learned is that the top came in actually faster and quicker than what I was expecting,” Suarez said. “I’m sure that these guys, they find out at exactly the same time (as) me. Maybe even sooner, because they were watching everyone, and I was just watching a few cars.

“I don’t feel like I had any advantage. For sure I was able to adjust my car a little bit for that. But other than that, I feel like we were in the same boat.”

Suarez never led a lap, but he came within a corner of winning the third stage before he was passed by Harvick.

Of the three drivers who advanced to the All-Star Race from the Open via a stage win, Suarez was the only one who finished in the top five.

“I feel like we did everything that we could,” Suarez said. “If I would have to do it again, I’m not sure what I would do different. The car was driving well, maybe a little bit tight at times, but I was loose as well. I don’t know. I feel like just different circumstances maybe could give us the victory. Just didn’t work out.”