Photo by Matt Sullivan/Getty Images

Jeffrey Earnhardt to run 13 races with Gaunt Brothers Racing

1 Comment

Gaunt Brothers Racing announced Friday that Jeffrey Earnhardt will drive the No. 96 Xtreme Concepts car in 13 of the remaining Cup races.

Earnhardt is in the car this weekend at Michigan. The only race he won’t be in the car will be next weekend at Bristol. Jesse Little is scheduled to drive the car there before Earnhardt takes over for the rest of the season.

Earnhardt has made eight Cup starts this season. His best finish is 11th at Daytona in July.

“I am excited to be partnered with Xtreme Concepts, Nine Line Apparel, iK9 and everyone who has come on board to make this possible,” Jeffrey Earnhardt said in a statement. “We had a solid run at Pocono Raceway with the Gaunt Brothers Racing team, and I am looking forward to growing the relationship with the team and bringing home some good finishes this year.”

Preliminary entry lists for NASCAR at Michigan, Mid-Ohio

Photo by Matt Sullivan/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Cup and Camping World Truck Series teams are at Michigan International Speedway. The Xfinity Series is at the Mid-Ohio  Sports Car Course. Here are the preliminary entry lists for each series:

Cup – Consumers Energy 400 (2:30 p.m. ET Sunday on NBCSN)

Forty cars are on the entry list for the Michigan Cup race. Garrett Smithley is listed in the No. 7 car for Premium Motorsports. Blake Jones is listed in the No. 23 car for BK Racing. BJ McLeod is listed in the No. 51 for Rick Ware Racing. Timmy Hill is in the No. 66 for MBM. Corey LaJoie is in the No. 72 for TriStar Motorsports. Jeffrey Earnhardt is in the No. 96 for Gaunt Brothers Racing. Gray Gaulding is listed in the No. 99 for StarCom Racing.

Click here for Cup entry list

Xfinity – Rock N Roll Tequila 170 (2:30 p.m. ET Saturday on NBCSN)

Forty cars are entered for the event at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course. Katherine Legge will make her NASCAR debut, driving the No. 15 for JD Motorsports. Brendan Gaughan will drive the No. 3 for Richard Childress Racing. Spencer Gallagher is back in the No. 23 for GMS Racing.

Click here for Xfinity entry list

Truck – Corrigan Oil 200 (1 p.m. ET Saturday on FS1)

Thirty-four trucks are entered for the event at Michigan International Speedway.

Click here for Truck entry list

Gaunt Brothers Racing expanding its schedule

Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images
1 Comment

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. — Car owner Marty Gaunt said that his team, Gaunt Brothers Racing, will run the remaining Cup races this season.

The team debuted in the 2017 Daytona 500. The team returned to run this year’s Daytona 500 and a few races. They later added the remaining restrictor-plate races, then the road courses and so on.

The team, which does not have a charter, announced last weekend at Pocono that Xtreme Concepts would sponsor the No. 96 car in 14 of the last 16 races.

Parker Kligerman is driving the car this weekend at Watkins Glen International. Gaunt said that Jeffrey Earnhardt will drive the car next weekend at Michigan. Jesse Little will drive the car at Bristol in two weeks. Gaunt said the team hopes to announce in about a week who will drive the remaining races.

Gaunt said that as their schedule expanded, the team went to Toyota Racing Development with their revised plans.

“They’re very supportive of it and they help us out a great deal with technical support,” Gaunt said. “That enabled us to go forward with the program.”

Gaunt, who used to own the engine company Triad Racing Technology before it closed, took the engine inventory and has Joe Gibbs Racing preparing those engines this season. The team has a fleet of eight cars.

Gaunt said that the team would like to run the entire season next year, pending sponsorship.

The team’s best finish this season is 13th at Daytona in July with D.J. Kennington.

Ryan: Plate race insanity needs more common sense driving

4 Comments

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – Before delving into an analysis of something inherently irrational, let’s revisit some timeless wisdom from an Australian sage named Marcos Ambrose.

“This is crazy racing. We can legitimize it all we want, but it’s insanity on four wheels.”

It might be the finest encapsulation to date of restrictor-plate racing — and the sheer madness has only gotten worse since Ambrose’s brutal honesty after the April 26, 2009 race at Talladega Superspeedway that ended with a car in the catchfence and seven injured fans.

Now compounded by stage racing, playoff berth implications and the Peltzman Effect (the Cup Series has never seemed safer, and thus drivers naturally are inclined to be riskier than ever), this might be the most aggressive era in the 30-year history of plate racing.

The exorbitant costs of overtime hours in fabrication shop tell that story, as do the box score incident reports (“2,3,4,9,10,11,12,13,14,17,19,21,22,41,42,43,48,88,95,72,78,1,7,15,32,34 accident turn 3”) that read like a drunken night of bingo

There were six major wrecks involving an aggregate 70 cars in two races at Daytona International Speedway this season, and all happened within roughly 10 yards of the lead.

That’s unacceptable, even by the often untenable circumstances mandated by plate racing.

Spare us the righteous indignation about the “proper” methods of blocking. It stirs echoes of what Ambrose told us about the logic of applying behavioral norms to lunacy.

Just drive better, guys.

Or maybe smarter.

This isn’t aimed solely at Ricky Stenhouse Jr., who took the brunt of the criticism for another less than stellar display of driving Saturday night. The wrecks were a replay of several ill-conceived moves made at the Daytona 500, and not all of them involved Stenhouse.

He was the first to note that he couldn’t take umbrage at William Byron for a block that started the chain reaction in Saturday night’s first crash because the Roush Fenway Racing driver had done the same thing in February.

In both Daytona races this year, there often seemed a rush to go … nowhere. Though some of the moves were driven by midrace points being at stake, there still were a disproportionate number of contenders eliminated by crashes within the first two stages.

Wrecks are part and parcel to plate racing, which is built around large packs running inches apart, but the pileups historically have started because of bobbles deep within the long trains of cars.

Now they often begin at the front because of an overarching belief that plate races can won only by dictating the action from the point.

“To win these races, you really need to be the leader,” Stenhouse said after leading a race-high 51 laps. “To win the stages and really kind of control the field. I felt like when I was in the front, I could really kind of control the field and make them do what I wanted to do. That’s why everybody was so aggressive trying to get to the front.”

The absurd conventions of plate racing often make drivers take bizarre actions, such as slamming into each other in the corners at 200 mph. NBCSN analyst Kyle Petty once referred to that bump drafting era of the mid-2000 as Cup drivers’ “meth habit”, and the single-minded, hell-bent desire to stay up front constantly in 2018 seems just as addicting.

There’s a fine line between “managing” lanes of traffic and blocking them, yes.

There also is a fine line between reasoning and rationalization.

It seems in the rush to lead every lap if possible, what’s been lost is that drivers have options, even if they are less than perfect.

Instead of throwing a late block on a car closing at more than 200 mph, you can choose to stay in your lane and swallow the loss of positions.

Instead of staying in the accelerator when a car darts in front, you can choose to lift off and pull out of line.

Of course, there are the consequences of losing several spots, but it doesn’t guarantee that you will lose the race. Yes, it’s harder to claw back to the front with the current horsepower/spoiler package (a handling combination endorsed by drivers, by the way), but it isn’t impossible.

Race winner Erik Jones rallied from a lap down from crash damage (and also fell backward after missing his stall on the first pit stop). Runner-up Martin Truex Jr. lost the draft midway through Daytona and yet was in the lead for the final restart.

They earned the rewards available after many of their peers took unnecessary and early risks that did little but damage their series’ reputation for showcasing elite talent.

“NASCAR is built on beating and banging, but I think what you’d like to see is aggressive moves that don’t result in the incidents we saw,” NASCAR chief racing development officer and senior vice president Steve O’Donnell said. “Certainly we like the aggressiveness of drivers going for wins, that’s what the sport is founded on, but you hope you can avoid some of the contact we saw Saturday.

There are conflicted feelings about the results of the Coke Zero Sugar 400, which produced the best postrace interview of the season in first-time winner Jones and also a litany of underdog finishers. The final two laps were just as scintillating even with 80% of the field essentially eliminated from contention.

But it isn’t a good look for NASCAR’s alleged 40 greatest drivers to turn their vehicles into battering rams with all of the precision and skill of a group of fourth-graders in bumper cars.

And then make those same mistakes time and again at the world’s most famous racetrack in hopes of a better outcome.

It sounds like another way to define insanity, actually.


Another contributing factor to the craziness of plate races? The rule outlawing advancing position by running beneath the yellow line, which restricts the amount of real estate with an imaginary boundary that drivers treat like a wall to help pin the competition.

The rule was created to stem the preponderance of multicar crashes that resulted from drivers racing on the apron and often off Turn 2 onto the backstretch.

But it receives much more attention when it determines race winners as it did Friday after Justin Haley dipped below the line to take a checkered flag that was awarded to Kyle Larson.

O’Donnell said drivers were informally polled about the yellow line rule last year, and the feedback was unanimous in wanting to keep it.

“Chaos would ensue” without it, O’Donnell said. “You never want to have to make that call (that decides a win), but that’s the rule.”

There almost certainly will be further discussion of the yellow line between NASCAR and drivers in the wake of the Daytona call (Ryan Newman, who has long challenged the validity of a racetrack with an out-of-bounds line, raised questions about in Saturday’s drivers meeting about the legality of Haley’s pass), but expect things to remain status quo.

The rule can’t be enforced arbitrarily, allowing last-lap passes that heretofore weren’t legal would undermine the integrity of a race.


It appears the rules for the cars also will remain static when NASCAR returns to Talladega Superspeedway in three months after a lackluster visit to the 2.66-mile oval in the spring.

NASCAR increased the width of the spoiler by a few inches on both sides at Daytona and also returned horsepower to where it had been in Speedweeks.

O’Donnell said driver feedback was positive about the impact on being able to maneuver, which should bode well after drivability had been a major problem at Talladega.


Saturday night was a major reminder that plate driving is the biggest weakness in Truex’s game, but the defending series champion almost seemed relieved despite letting the win slip away on the final restart.

“All in all, I think for us it was a good night, and did all the things we needed to do,” he said. “I’ve just got to work on my mirror driving skills. I’m not real good at it. And just happy to get through here alive and finish.  I joked all week that I hadn’t finished this race in eight or ten years, and that’s not ‑‑ I mean, it’s kind of funny but it’s not really.  It’s true and sad.”

Actually, it had been only four years since Truex had finished on the lead lap of a July race at Daytona, but the results probably run together in his 0-for-54 streak in plate races.

He has joked before that he needs to be “more of a jerk” to win at Daytona and Talladega. But if the Kryptonite in your stock-car skillset is being unable to guess how to drive like the annoying masses who refuse to merge and hog the left lane of every highway in America … well, we can think of worse deficiencies.


An overlooked nugget from Saturday night: Was that the last time we’ll see an Earnhardt race at Daytona?

After seven Cup starts this season, Jeffrey Earnhardt has no races scheduled after his 11th Saturday. He hung around for an extended selfie session he held in the pits with friends and sponsors. “We might have abused our pass limit, but thankfully we got NASCAR to allow us to bring all these guys out here,” he joked.

It could be remembered as apropos goodbye as a salute to a family legacy that became synonymous with the 2.5-mile oval in triumph and tragedy.

Jesse Little set for Cup debut at Kentucky with Premium Motorsports

Getty Images
1 Comment

Jesse Little, son of former Cup driver Chad Little, will make his Cup Series debut Saturday at Kentucky Speedway (7:30 p.m. ET on NBCSN), driving Premium Motorsports’ No. 7 Chevrolet.

Little, 21, has 18 starts in the Camping World Truck Series since 2015. His best result is sixth earlier this season at Iowa Speedway.

“I’m very humbled by this opportunity to make my Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series debut this weekend at Kentucky,” Little said in a press release. “There’s no expectations for Saturday night’s race other than to take the green flag and see the checkered flag. I would like to thank (owner) Jay Robinson for giving me the opportunity to gain valuable experience behind the wheel.”

Little will be the sixth driver to pilot the No. 7 this season, joining Danica Patrick, Reed Sorenson, J.J. Yeley, DJ Kennington and Jeffrey Earnhardt. Earnhardt delivered the team its best result last weekend at Daytona, finishing 11th.

Chad Little made 217 Cup starts between 1986 and 2002. He is NASCAR’s managing director for technical inspection and officiating.