Bump & Run: Who will finish with more career Cup wins? Kyle or Jimmie?

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Kyle Busch has 52 Cup wins. Jimmie Johnson has 83 Cup wins. Busch is a decade younger than Johnson. Who will finish their career with more Cup wins?

Dustin Long: Kyle Busch is a generational talent and still has many Cup wins ahead of him. It’s easy to look at what he’s done since 2015 and project that type of pace (23 wins in the last 137 races for a 16.8 percent winning percentage), but I think Jimmie Johnson has multiple wins left before his career ends and Johnson finishes ahead.

Daniel McFadin: If I were to base my answer just on how Busch has performed in the first four races following a season where he won eight times, I’d say him. Johnson is running on limited time and he hasn’t won since 2017. Busch looks like he can only be slowed by penalties and mechanical failures. Johnson looks like he needs some help just to finish in the top 10, which he was able to do in Phoenix.

Jerry Bonkowski: One thing that has been overlooked about Busch is that he has earned more than half (28) of his 52 Cup wins since 2013. He’s definitely getting better as he gets older and it would not be a reach to say he’s in the prime of his career. I think he’s motivated to reach 100 Cup wins. He’d have to average five wins per season for each of the next 10 years to do so by the time he’s 44. Unless he decides to retire, I think he can overtake Johnson – or will continue racing until he does so.

Nate Ryan: Kyle Busch will finish with more than Johnson and very possibly more than David Pearson’s 105.

In the last six Cup races, dating back to November’s playoff race at ISM Raceway, Team Penske and Joe Gibbs Racing each have won three times. Which organization is the best?

Dustin Long: Joe Gibbs Racing. JGR has two wins and three runner-up finishes to Team Penske’s two wins and one runner-up finish this season.

Daniel McFadin: I’ll give it to Penske because they’ve shown to be more consistent with their three cars than Joe Gibbs with four. For JGR, Busch has been the only car that’s been a consistent threat up front in all four races. If not for a cut tire and a pit penalty, we could be talking about him having three wins. Truex has shown closing speed and Hamlin resurfaced in Phoenix after a two-race disappearance. Penske has shown they can be fast anywhere.

Jerry Bonkowski: They’re both on the same level in my opinion. If I had to pick one, I’d give the edge to Team Penske because Joey Logano won the championship last season, and JGR hasn’t won a title since 2015 (Kyle Busch). I think there’s a lot of similarity between JGR and Team Penske, and as such, they feed off each other both on and off the race track.

Nate Ryan: It’s close to a virtual tie, but because of Joey Logano’s 2018 championship and the recent three-week run of two victories and a pole position, I’ll give the nod to Team Penske.

Kyle Busch won Sunday, Martin Truex Jr. has two runner-up finishes in the past three races, and Denny Hamlin won the Daytona 500. Who has been Joe Gibbs Racing’s best Cup driver this season?

Dustin Long: Kyle Busch with his win and two runner-up finishes tops Martin Truex Jr., who has no wins and two runner-up results this year.

Daniel McFadin: Busch. He’s the only Cup driver to finish in the top 10 in every race and he leads the series with three tops fives. Pretty simple.

Jerry Bonkowski: I’d give the edge to Busch, who has a win, three top-five finishes and has not finished lower than sixth. Plus he’s been no lower than fourth in the points (he’s No. 1 this week after the Phoenix win).

Nate Ryan: This is also a very tough call, but in addition to his win Sunday, Busch has the second at Daytona and a third at Las Vegas (where he probably could have won without a penalty).

Restarts are as wild as ever, but yet there haven’t been any multicar accidents listed in the past three box scores since the Daytona 500. Are restarts somehow wilder than ever but drivers also better than ever at keeping their cars beneath them?

Dustin Long: The added downforce has helped drivers when cars got out of shape. What might have turned into a crash before is now a nice save.

Daniel McFadin: I think drivers are able to control their cars to a remarkable degree, but I also think the increased levels of downforce make the cars less likely to spin out of control. We’ve seen plenty of cars make contact in the last three races without anything bad happen. Most of the incidents Sunday came from parts and tire failures.

Jerry Bonkowski: While restarts may look as wild as ever, drivers are being more cautious to not make over-the-top moves, in my opinion. They saw how much Daytona and all the wrecks impacted them and put so many teams off on the wrong foot to start the season, as a result. They realize how important stage points and good finishes are and may look like they’re driving as wild as ever, but I believe they’re being more selective in picking their spots to be aggressive and when not to be.

Nate Ryan: This might be heresy, but I think restarts have been wild since the introduction of double file nearly 10 years ago. The only difference is that this year’s lower horsepower has allowed cars to run three and four abreast to a slightly greater degree and duration. It is surprising that multicar crashes have yet to be more prevalent, though.