With careers likely ending Matt Kenseth, Jamie McMurray are all smiles

Adrian Parker
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While Joey Logano celebrated his first Cup Series title Sunday at Homestead-Miami Speedway, two friends posed for a picture on pit road.

Matt Kenseth and Jamie McMurray were all smiles.

Roush Fenway Racing’s Kenseth had just finished sixth in his 665th and likely last Cup start.

Chip Ganassi Racing’s McMurray placed 18th in possibly his last start as a full-time driver.

Kenseth, who returned to Roush this season for 15 starts in the No. 6 Ford after losing his ride at Joe Gibbs Racing, hasn’t announced any plans for 2019 season.

The 2003 Cup champion told NBC Sports in September he wasn’t looking for a ride, but that he was “looking forward to still being a part” of Roush, which he raced for in Cup from 1999 – 2012 before moving to JGR.

“I think it’s cool to end it there” Kenseth said. “You never know what’s going to pop up. Maybe something will pop up where you need to run a few races and there’s some opportunities.”

Should his career be over, Kenseth provided a nice bookend to it. As a 26-year-old in 1998, Kenseth made his Cup debut at Dover International Speedway, driving in place of Bill Elliott in his No. 94 McDonald’s Ford. Elliott missed that race to attend his father’s funeral.

Kenseth started that race 19th and placed sixth.

McMurray is still deciding on what’s in store for him next year.

The seven-time Cup winner has an offer from Chip Ganassi to compete in the Daytona 500 in a third car before transitioning into a management role for the team he competed for from 2002-05 and ’10-18.

The 2010 Daytona 500 and Brickyard 400 winner said over the weekend there’s “a lot of other things that I’m going through trying to figure out that I can’t say, but I hope I can soon.”

But the 42-year-old said he is at peace with the likely end of his NASCAR career after talking with former teammates such as Casey Mears, Greg Biffle and Kenseth.

“I’ve talked to a lot of drivers that have recently went through it, and everyone’s story is exactly the same,” McMurray said. “And so if I feel the way that they do, I’m looking forward to three to four races into next year.”

Should McMurray’s career end with the Daytona 500, he would exit the cockpit after 583 Cup starts.

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