Chase Elliott wins in wild finish at Dover

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DOVER, Del. – Chase Elliott fended off Denny Hamlin on a restart in overtime, winning the Round of 12 opener Sunday at Dover International Speedway.

Joey Logano finished third, followed by Erik Jones and Kurt Busch.

Elliott took the lead by staying out of the pits during a late yellow and hung on for his second career victory through two late restarts on the 1-mile oval.

It was a redemptive win for the Hendrick Motorsports driver, who lost the lead to Kyle Busch with a lap remaining a year earlier at Dover.

“Definitely makes it sweeter for sure,” said Elliott, who also rebounded Sunday from an uncontrolled tire penalty on his No. 9 Chevrolet.

MORE: Race results

MORE: Points standings

A mostly tame race turned wild with three cautions in the final 60 laps as seemingly surefire bids for wins by Stewart-Haas Racing drivers faded, first for Kevin Harvick and then Aric Almirola.

Almirola’s lead evaporated with less than 10 laps remaining when teammate Clint Bowyer slammed the SAFER barrier after suffering a mechanical failure.

The resulting yellow jumbled the field as Elliott, Brad Keselowski and Martin Truex Jr. stayed out to take the top three spots, followed by Denny Hamlin and Alex Bowman on two tires.

Almirola was the first driver out of the pits on four tires in sixth. His No. 10 Ford slipped up off the second turn after the green, causing him to tap Keselowski into a multicar crash that also collected Truex and Bowman.

“We’ve had so many opportunities and been so close and had the car to win and been in position and I don’t know, it just seems to not come through,” said Almirola, who was a half-lap from winning the Daytona 500 and also nearly triumphed at Chicagoland and New Hampshire. “I don’t know. I’m frustrated and mad and angry.”

Seven of the 12 playoff drivers finished outside the top 10: Ryan Blaney (11th), Kyle Larson (12th), Almirola (13th), Keselowski (14th), Truex (15th), Bowman (28th) and Bowyer (35th).

Bowyer had been running in the top five for much of the race, including a stretch when all four Stewart-Haas cars occupied the top four spots.

“I guess we had another loose wheel, this sucks,” Bowyer said. “I’m so sick for Aric, that was his race to win.”

Seeking a clean sweep of 2018 at Dover (where he also won both stages and won in May), Harvick led a race-high 286 laps and was in control until a pit stop under green with 80 laps remaining. A valve stem on a left-side tire was knocked off, necessitating another pit stop under green to fix a flat.

Harvick returned to the track a lap down in 13th but caught a break when the first non-stage caution flag flew 20 laps later and put him back on the lead lap. He rebounded for sixth after narrowly missing the last pileup.

“We were just lucky there and wound up dodging and weaving and being in the right place,” Harvick told NBCSN’s Kelli Stavast. “I guess that makes up for the bad luck of losing the race with an absolute dominant car.”

The error by Harvick’s team came during a race in which all of the Big Three championship contenders made late mistakes. Kyle Busch and Truex also were hit with speeding penalties in the pits during the final 100 laps. Busch rallied for eighth.

Harvick’s dominance was evident early as only 14 cars remained on the lead lap after the first stage.

After falling out of the playoffs a week earlier because of a spin while gunning for a last-lap win at Charlotte Motor Speedway, Jimmie Johnson failed to take the green flag at the track where has a record number of victories.

The 11-time winner at Dover suffered a ball joint failure on the right front of his No. 48 Chevrolet on the pace laps and went to the garage for repairs. He returned on Lap 11 and finished 36th.

STAGE 1 WINNER: Harvick

STAGE 2 WINNER: Harvick

NOTABLE: The last two winners of the Round of 12 opener went on to capture the championship. Jimmie Johnson (2016) and Martin Truex Jr. (last year) each won at Charlotte Motor Speedway, which moved into the cutoff race of the Round of 16 this season.

QUOTE OF THE RACE: “After last fall, I was really making sure I didn’t make any contact, to be honest with you.” — Denny Hamlin on being outside of Chase Elliott for the final restart. Hamlin crashed Elliott while racing for the lead at Martinsville Speedway on an overtime restart in October 2017.

WHAT’S NEXT: 1000Bulbs.com 500 at Talladega Superspeedway, 2 p.m., Oct. 14 on NBC.

All-Star winners & losers

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WINNERS

Kyle LarsonHe joked that by running in the Monster Open he was in the B Main, but he won the final stage to advance to the All-Star Race and then went on to win the main event. He became only the fourth driver in All-Star history to win the event after transferring in from the preliminary race.

Bubba Wallace It was the night he needed. He’s referenced recently how tough things have been on him in his life. After losing the opening stage of the Monster Open, a “pissed off” Wallace won the next stage in a tight finish to advance to the All-Star Race and get a big hug from Ryan Blaney. Wallace went on to finish fifth in the All-Star Race and beamed afterward. “I honestly haven’t had this much fun in a long time,” Wallace said.

Fans — They saw spectacular finishes in the first two stages of the Monster Open, saw three-wide racing at times during the night, saw a different winner this season in Kyle Larson, and saw Clint Bowyer run to Ryan Newman’s car and start swinging at Newman, who remained in the car, in retaliation for contact that sent Bowyer into the wall on the cool-down lap. What more do you want?

LOSERS

Erik JonesThe best thing that can be said about his rough night was that it was a non-points race so his last-place finish didn’t hurt him in his bid to make the playoffs.

Kevin Harvick’s pit crew — Harvick was not happy with how his pit crew performed after his second-place finish. After winning the second stage, Harvick lost six spots on pit road and then had a loose wheel a few laps into the run. Said Harvick of his crew: “They just need to be ready to race. They’ve done it all year. You can’t just show up and have it be a disaster. They’ve been great all year. Tonight wasn’t great.”

Fabricators — The All-Star Race promotes beating and banging and there was a good bit of it Saturday. There were five incidents in the 150 laps of racing on the night for incidents, involving nine different cars. Many others also were beat up. Of course, imagine if they held an All-Star Race on a short track.

Being in Open was key for 4 drivers who transferred into All-Star Race

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Saturday night showed the significance of how competing in the Monster Energy Open can pay big dividends in the NASCAR All-Star Race.

All four drivers who transferred from the Open – stage winners William Byron, Bubba Wallace and race winner Kyle Larson, along with fan vote winner Alex Bowman – showed their mettle by finishing in the top 10 of the All-Star Race, led by Larson, who took the checkered flag.

“I always think if there’s one positive to being in the B Main (the Open), it’s that you get that extra track time,” Larson said. “I feel like in the first few laps, those guys that are in the B main can be really aggressive because they know the limits of the race car and stuff.

“So you can see the four of us or whatever kind of be really aggressive and get to the mid-pack pretty quickly. And then everybody kind of figures it out after that. But there’s a slight advantage for the first 10, 15 laps, I think, of being in that race.”

It was the second time that Larson has won the Open – he also took the checkered flag in 2016 – and transferred into the All-Star Race.

Added Larson’s crew chief, Chad Johnston: I felt like when you run the Open, you kind of have an advantage — especially with the first 30-lap run of being on track, knowing what to expect, being able to adjust on your car. Where the guys that are in the All-Star Race don’t have that. So it’s a good time to take advantage of that information and being able to gain some of the track position back pretty quickly.”

Perhaps the most emotional moment of the Open came afterward when Stage 2 winner Wallace cried in joy of putting himself and the No. 43 Richard Petty Motorsports Chevrolet into the main event.

“It’s been hard, been really hard,” Wallace said of his season to date. “I was trying to hold them (tears) back and telling yourself you can’t do it anymore is tough. To give up and whatnot.

“I gave up the first Stage win and I didn’t say anything on the radio. But my parents and everyone that has always helped me always said, when I am pissed off I drive better. So, I did everything I could. I told myself to quit, and don’t even try again for the second Stage.

“My mental game is really shot right now, but damn it feels good to win something. I have failed at a lot of things in life recently, but I am working to make those things better.”

Wallace would go on to finish fifth in his first career appearance in the All-Star Race.

“I had tons of fun tonight,” Wallace said. “I honestly haven’t had this much fun in a long time. It’s been a struggle, but it was a big night for us. When you don’t have anything on the line, I guess it means something different.

“The first thing my mom said to me after the Open was ‘You know who that was? That was God. He’s not giving up on you yet’. I’ve realized that. As many dark moments that I’ve had and telling myself to give up, it’s been really tough. It’s been tough to keep coming in and keep going. Tonight just shows that I’ll be back next week.”

As for Hendrick Motorsports teammates Byron, who won the first stage of the Open, and fan vote winner Bowman, the preliminary race helped in finishing eighth and ninth, respectively, in the All-Star Race.

“It was just amazing, it feels awesome to be in the All-Star Race,” Byron said of his first appearance in the event. “I’ve been coming to this race since I was about five or six years old. It’s really exciting to be a part of it. It was huge, we needed this. We’ve had some really good qualifying efforts this year; we just needed to finish it off with something positive and this was definitely positive for us. I’m excited for it.”

Said Bowman: “You want to race your way in, and we did that last year and had a car very capable of doing that this year. Restarts didn’t go our way, and it is what it is.”

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All-Star Race leaves Bubba Wallace with a big smile

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CONCORD, N.C. — It was a smile that wasn’t forced, a smile that didn’t deflect, and a smile that was not laced with hidden meanings.

This was genuine, perhaps a little forgotten, but oh so nice.

“I honestly haven’t had this much fun in a long time,” Wallace said after a night that saw him win a stage in the Monster Open to advance to the All-Star race and then finish fifth in that event.

It has been a long time since Wallace could feel so good. He noted last week that he had been depressed about things in his life. Results on the track also had not been inspiring.

Asked earlier this season at Auto Club Speedway what his team was lacking, Wallace said: “Money. It’s where we’re lacking. We need money to make more speed.”

He has not finished better than 17th in a points race this season. He has one top-10 results in his last 41 points races. That runner-up finish for the Richard Petty Motorsports driver in the 2018 Daytona 500 – and the tearful hug with his mother – seems so long ago. 

All of that can make it hard to smile.

That’s why Saturday meant so much to Wallace. He won (the second stage in the Monster Open), earning a hug from Ryan Blaney in the garage. Wallace then finished close enough to the front in the All-Star Race that he could see the leaders.

Yet, this night started with the same cruelty that has struck him so often on the track. Wallace was in the lead on the final lap of the opening stage of the Monster Open but William Byron nipped Wallace by inches at the line.

Wallace yelled an adult word repeatedly on the radio to express his frustration.

“Ever since I was a kid, they said I drive better when I’m pissed off,” Wallace said. “I was pissed off. I was really off after that. I let that one go. I thought that was it. Then the caution came out (in the second stage) and the same scenario.”

Another overtime finish.

“I’m not giving it up this time,” Wallace said. “So you’ve got to do what you’ve got do.”

This time Wallace raced Daniel Suarez on the last lap of the stage for the win. They made contact. Suarez spun and Wallace won to earn a spot in his first All-Star Race.

Wallace ran toward the back of the 19-car field in the first two stages. He moved into the top 10 in the third stage, finishing sixth.

He started outside the top 10 in the final 15-lap stage but was ninth in a couple of laps. Wallace moved up as others pitted with 12 laps to go and climbed up to fourth after a restart. Joey Logano passed Wallace with four laps to go, dropping Wallace to fifth. He held off Aric Almirola to finish there.

How much did that all that mean for him?

“I’m showing teeth in my smile,” Wallace said. “So that says a lot.”

Yes, it did.

Kevin Harvick on pit crew: ‘They just weren’t prepared tonight’

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CONCORD, N.C. — Kevin Harvick described his runner-up finish in Saturday night’s All-Star Race as “terrible” because of the struggles on pit road.

Harvick won the second stage but lost six spots on pit road and then suffered a loose wheel a few laps later. He was helped when a caution came out for an incident that involved Kyle Busch, Erik Jones and Austin Dillon. That kept him from needing to pit under green and lose a lap. But even that didn’t cool his frustration after finishing second to Kyle Larson for the $1 million prize. 

“We shot both of our feet off with the absolute dominant car,” said Harvick, who won last year’s All-Star Race. “The guys did a great job preparing the race car and weren’t ready to make a pit stop on pit road tonight.”

Asked if changes need to be made to the pit crew, Harvick said:

“They just need to be ready to race. They’ve done it all year. You can’t just show up and have it be a disaster. They’ve been great all year. Tonight wasn’t great. That’s for sure. Spotted the whole field, started the tail back with 15 laps to go.

“All you’ve got to do is the same pit stop you do every week. It is not any different. You’ve just got to be prepared. They just weren’t prepared tonight.”

Harvick said he expects the pit crew to be better for next weekend’s Coca-Cola 600.

“They’re experienced enough,” said Harvick, who led 33 of 88 laps. “They know that it didn’t go the way they wanted it to go. They’ll go back and they’ll be ready. That’s the great part about having an experienced pit crew. They can go back and fix it. They better fix it.”