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New rules for All-Star Race make this anyone’s event to win

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How will Saturday night’s All-Star Race unfold at Charlotte Motor Speedway with a new rules package virtually untested in the real world?

“We will just have to wait and see,” Hendrick Motorsports driver Alex Bowman said, succinctly summarized the thoughts of many.

“The rules package NASCAR is planning to use for the All-Star Race is definitely going to be interesting and something different,” Bowman said in a release this week. “It’s cool that NASCAR is trying to constantly make the racing better.”

This week’s prerace releases have been filled with uncertainty. Martin Truex Jr. hopes to use that to his advantage because the rules won’t carry over to the Coca-Cola 600. He isn’t the only one experiencing a change in attitude this year.

Locked into the All-Star Race because of his 2008 victory in the event, Kasey Kahne has the opportunity to deliver Leavine Family Racing one of its biggest successes. Much like racing on the restrictor-plate superspeedways, conventional wisdom will not apply, and this likely will be a wild-card race.

“With us not having run this rules package, we go into this weekend not exactly sure how the cars are going to feel in general, how they’ll work around other cars, or what the speeds will be like,” Kahne said. “It’s tough to say how it will all work out, but we won’t be learning much from this weekend to carry over into the 600 like we may have in years past. Teams will try to go out and win the All-Star Race with this package, and then next weekend, we’ll go back to racing what we’ve been racing all season long.”

“This package is going to be different, there’s no question about it,” David Ragan said. “Charlotte Motor Speedway is a place where the field tends to get strung out really fast, but these rules will slow everybody down a little, and I think we might see more side-by-side racing. And maybe it can spark some new conversation in the industry on a direction we need to go.”

The teams aren’t exactly working in a vacuum. NASCAR used a version of this rules package at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in the Xfinity race last year, and the general consensus was that it did, in fact, create more side-by-side racing.

“I think we have to try this new aero package and see where it goes,” Chris Buescher said. “I know the (Xfinity cars) were able to use it at Indy, and I think as far as statistics go, there was a lot of movement in the field and green-flag passing, and I know that’s what NASCAR is after to try and create something different for the All-Star Race.”

Because no one really knows what to expect, a new rules package levels the playing field and may just well give a less experienced driver a chance to shine.

“Hopefully, what I learned with that aero package last year at Indy (in Xfinity) will apply,” William Byron said. “I feel like maybe I’ll have a little bit of the upper hand just knowing what my car needs to do because I think a lot of guys may be up in the air on what to do with their cars (with the new package).”

What will actually happen in the race is anyone’s guess – much the same as on plate tracks.

Without points on the line, there is an incentive to take risks one might not otherwise. This race is already prone to high-risk moves. If the rules package slows the cars arbitrarily and the entirety of the race is run in a pack or multiple packs, the proximity of these enthusiastic drivers to one another could be a recipe for excitement – or disaster.

What other drivers said:

  • “This year’s race in particular will be interesting with the new rules package. I can’t really give any opinion one way or the other until we get on the racetrack around other cars to see what it will be like.” – Jamie McMurray
  • “I’m excited to get on track with the new package we’ll run and see how it feels and how it races.” – Kyle Larson
  • “You never know what is going to happen, especially with the new aero package that we will run. Anyone can win the race.” – Ty Dillon
  • “Obviously, speeds are going to be slower, a lot more downforce, a lot more drag. But it’s still a big question mark. Nobody knows how it’s really going to play out.” – Michael McDowell

Kyle Busch, Bubba Wallace involved in multicar wreck on Lap 2 at Bristol

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BRISTOL, Tenn. – A 15-car wreck occurred on Lap 2 of Saturday night’s race at Bristol Motor Speedway, eliminating Bubba Wallace, AJ Allmendinger, Michael McDowell and Gray Gaulding.

The wreck also involved Kyle Busch, Kasey Kahne, Jesse Little, Martin Truex Jr., Ty Dillon, Ryan Blaney, Denny Hamlin, Daniel Suarez, and JJ Yeley. Martin Truex Jr. narrowly avoided clipping Busch’s car.

The wreck started when Busch spun in Turn 4 and stopped just past the entrance to the frontstretch.

McDowell then plowed into the back of Busch’s car, and Little rammed the left side. Busch was able to continue two laps down after making repairs.

“It just felt like an ARCA wreck,” Wallace said. “I hit the No. 47 (AJ Allmendinger) before my spotter called it I had run into the back of the No. 47, but then I got checked-up enough to pull down out line and just kept getting shoved into cars.  It’s unfortunate.  I was super excited to run tonight and see how we stacked up, but fate had other plans.”

Check back for more.

Songs from driver introductions for the Bristol Night Race

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It’s that time again.

With NASCAR’s summer return to Bristol Motor Speedway this weekend, that means another round of driver introductions with a special soundtrack.

Below are the songs drivers were introduced to before tonight’s Cup race.

Some of these songs are being reused from April when the songs were voted on by fans.

1.       Kyle Larson                       “Dirt Road Anthem” by Jason Aldean

2.       Chase Elliott                     “A Crazy Racin’ Man” by Bill Elliott

3.       Kyle Busch                        “All I Do is WIN” by DJ Khaled

4.       Paul Menard                    “R.O.C.K. in the USA” by John Mellencamp

5.       William Byron                  “Fan the Flames” by Liberty University

6.       Kevin Harvick                   “Happy” by Pharrell

7.       Denny Hamlin                 “Forever” by Drake, Kanye West, Lil Wayne & Eminem

8.       Aric Almirola                    “Miami Vice”

9.       Kurt Busch                      “Outlaw State of Mind” by Chris Stapleton

10.   Ryan Blaney                     “Folsom Prison Blues” by Johnny Cash

11.   Brad Keselowski              “Little Deuce Coupe” by The Beach Boys

12.   Ricky Stenhouse Jr.         “People Back Home” by Florida Georgia Line

13.   Jimmie Johnson              “Seven Nation Army” by The White Stripes

14.   Erik Jones                         “You Ain’t Seen Nothin Yet” by Bachman Turner Overdrive

15.   David Ragan                     “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” by the Charlie Daniels Band

16.   Clint Bowyer                    “Country Boy Can Survive” by Hank Williams Jr.                             

17.   Martin Truex Jr.              “Reason to Drink” by Cole Swindell

18.   Austin Dillon                    “Cowboy” by Kid Rock

19.   Joey Logano                     “Brass Monkey” by The Beastie Boys

20.   Jamie McMurray             “One” by Metallica

21.   Daniel Suarez                  “Speedy Gonzales” by Pat Boone

22.   Alex Bowman                  “Rise” by I Prevail

23.   Trevor Bayne                   “Rocky Top” by the Pride of the Southland Marching Band

24.   Ryan Newman                 “Huntin, Fishin & Lovin Every Day” by Luke Bryan

25.   AJ Allmendinger              “I’m Alright” by Kenny Logins

26.   Kasey Kahne                    “5-1-5-0” by Dierks Bentley

27.   Bubba Wallace                “Into The Fire” by Asking Alexandria

28.   Chris Buescher                “Pork and Beans” by Weezer

29.   Matt DiBenedetto           “Rocky Theme Song”

30.   Corey LaJoie                     “Fortunate Son” by Creedence Clearwater Revival

31.   Michael McDowell          “Taking it to the Streets”, by The Doobie Brothers

32.   Ty Dillon                           “Walk it Like I Talk It” by Migos

33.   Jesse Little                        “John Deere Green” by Joe Diffie

34.   JJ Yeley                              “Warrior” by Imagine Dragons

35.   Ross Chastain                  “Watermelon Crawl” by Tracy Byrd

36.   Reed Sorenson                “Purple Haze” by Jimi Hendrix

37.   Timmy Hill                        “Crazy Train” by Ozzy Osborne

38.   Gray Gaulding                 “Makes Me Wonder” by Maroon 5

39.   Landon Cassill                 “Going to Mars” by Judah and the Lion

40.   Blake Jones                      “Copperhead Road” by Steve Earle

Austin Dillon’s car fails pre-race inspection, will start from rear

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Bristol, Tenn. — Austin Dillon‘s No. 3 Chevrolet failed pre-race inspection three times Saturday at Bristol Motor Speedway.

Dillon will start from the rear and his car chief, Greg Ebert, has been ejected from the event.

Dillon had qualified 18th.

Dillon will have to serve a 30-minute practice hold in two weeks at Darlington Raceway.

Kyle Larson seeks turnaround at ‘by far my favorite racetrack’

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BRISTOL, Tenn. – With his team in a mini-slump in midsummer, Kyle Larson is back in his happy place, and the Chip Ganassi Racing driver wouldn’t mind returning more often.

“I love racing here,” Larson said Thursday at Bristol Motor Speedway. “I wish we could race here weekly. I think our sport would be in a good spot if we could.

“I didn’t watch a ton of NASCAR growing up, but I’d never miss a Bristol race. If you were to ask me what Bristol race stands out, I couldn’t tell you. I just loved watching Bristol. It was always a lot of fun. Ever since they added the progressive banking, it’s been a lot better, too, as far as style of racing goes. It’s by far my favorite NASCAR track.”

The love of Bristol grew only stronger Friday night as he won the Food City 300 and scored his first victory in 18 Cup and Xfinity starts at the 0.533-mile oval.

Larson will be trying for his first win in NASCAR’s premier series at the track – and his first in Cup this season – while starting from the pole position in tonight’s race.

A victory would be a welcome result for Larson’s team, which is virtually locked into the playoffs but has only two top 10s in six races since his memorable runner-up finish to Kyle Busch at Chicagoland Speedway.

While Chevrolet teams Hendrick Motorsports and Richard Childress Racing seem to have gotten faster in recent weeks, Larson’s No. 42 Camaro seems to have tailed off slightly after easily being the best Chevy in the first half of the season.

“I don’t know where we might be off,” he said. “Nobody really honestly knows where other teams have gotten speed from, so we’re working on all areas, really, I’m pretty sure, to try and get faster. We have moments where we’re really fast, but I would say we’re just a little inconsistent from track to track.

“You look at last year, we were good everywhere. This year, we’re good at our good tracks. Not as good at the tracks that we have struggled at years prior.”

But what about starting and finishing 17th last Sunday at Michigan International Speedway, where he won three consecutive races from 2016-17?

A loose wheel after his first pit stop mired Larson in traffic and out of sequence, and then contact on a restart hampered into using an older set of tires for the last run of the race.

“It just snowballed into a bad run where I felt like we were going to have a shot to run top 3 or 5, but it just doesn’t show for it, and other people look at it as we just ran bad all day,” he said. “If you look at lap times, we were running some of the fastest laps of the race, just buried in traffic. I feel like we’re not that bad. We just had a little bit of a bad luck that cost us finishes we deserved the last few weeks.”

The urgency to maximize his speed stems more from being well positioned in the playoffs than making the 16-driver field. Larson is one of three provisionally qualified who have no playoff points yet.

“That part is a little frustrating,” he said. “It makes you more nervous when it comes to the playoffs, but the good thing is there’s been three guys taking up all the playoff points, so the other ones don’t have a whole lot, either, but every point matters.

“You look at it as you need to win some stages and win a race, but I also view Bristol as being my best opportunity to get some playoff points. I feel like we can win both stages and win the race. Not easily but this is our best shot. That five to seven points would be huge.”

And after getting bumped from the lead by race winner Kyle Busch at Bristol in April, Larson has earned some leeway in playing rough – not that he plans to use it.

He prefers the “options” afforded by the 2007 addition of progressive banking (which was retrofitted in 2012 in a manner that often makes the top groove the fastest).

“If there was progressive banking 20 years ago, the racing would have been a lot better back then,” he said. “I’m not a fan of the bump and run. I’m just a fan of Bristol.

“I’d much rather see two to three wide racing at Bristol than single file. I think the racing is really good, and that’s why I love coming here to race.”