Podcast: Brad Keselowski says veterans’ jealousy of younger drivers is OK and ‘natural’

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Brad Keselowski has expressed reservations about the way NASCAR is marketing the next wave of stars and has an answer for those who say he’s just another jealous veteran.

You’re right.

“There’s no way of saying that without being just in some ways jealous,” Keselowski said on an episode of the NASCAR on NBC podcast released Wednesday. “And you know what? We are.”

The Team Penske driver received some support from NASCAR after being an Xfinity (then Nationwide) Series contender from 2008-10. But Keselowski largely was an afterthought as a Cup rookie in 2010 (when he won the lower-division title).

“There was a small push behind me (after winning the championship),” he said. “I felt it. It felt good. It really did. I remember Nationwide did a commercial, and I was like, ‘Man, I’m on a commercial! This is so cool!’ And NASCAR and Nationwide did it together, it would air every once in a while. Then I got to Cup , and it was, ‘Boy, you ain’t done (expletive). Until you do (expletive), don’t talk to us. That’s what it was like.

“Speaking of commercials, I’ll never forget, the standard answer at that time was go win a championship and get back to us. When I did win a championship, it was like all right, we’ll do a commercial with your car in it. That’s what the commercial was. You can stand in front of the car and make a pose, but you’re not going to say anything.

“And now it’s you look out on the landscape and see drivers that have been doing this for years and don’t have any wins or have one win and have five commercials, and you’re like, son of a … “

Hence, the jealousy and backlash from some veterans about the marketing push toward the group of 20something drivers that includes Kyle Larson, Ryan Blaney, Chase Elliott, Erik Jones, Daniel Suarez, Bubba Wallace, Alex Bowman and William Byron.

“Whether it’s me, Kyle (Busch) or anybody, yeah, we’re jealous,” Keselowski said. “It’s OK to admit we’re jealous. It’s a natural human instinct. If the sport had done what it’s doing for these young drivers now when guys like Kyle and I were just coming in, the sport would be in a better place.

“And with respect to that, I don’t want to come off as not being supportive of NASCAR promoting those young drivers, because I do think it’s good. I agree with it. I completely understand the efforts. I just think they missed really big 10 years ago. In some respects, we’re probably paying for that now. It is what it is. Sitting here and complaining about it isn’t going to change it. You can’t go back in time. But I think it’s also not unhealthy to recognize it.”

During the podcast, which is the first half of two-part episode with Keselowski, the 2012 champion also discusses:

–His respect for Kyle Busch as a Camping World Series team owner;

–His thoughts on Formula E and how the next iteration of the NASCAR Cup engine could be positioned with hybrid qualities;

–Which young drivers have impressed him;

–The fragility of Cup cars and why NASCAR should eliminate the splitter;

–An amusing and memorable story of how he spun Tony Stewart as an unknown short-track racer in Michigan 15 years ago.

Click on the embed above to hear the podcast or listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, Spotify or wherever you download podcasts.

Ryan Sieg, Shane Wilson ready for opportunity races in Xfinity playoffs

Ryan Sieg Racing
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When Shane Wilson answered his phone Tuesday he was in the process of leaving a UPS store, a weekly destination that’s part of his many crew chief duties at Ryan Sieg Racing.

This week the team had to: prepare three cars for Friday’s Xfinity Series race at Richmond – including a car for Hermie Sadler, who is making his first Xfinity start since 2016 and the first ever for RSR, as well as repair a wrecked No. 93 car from Las Vegas and get Ryan Sieg’s No. 39 Chevrolet ready for a playoff run.

“Shoooo, we’re busy,” Wilson tells NBC Sports. “But, you know, good busy.”

That’s all been done with seven crew members at the team’s shop located just outside of Atlanta.

“We can go with seven-and-a-half to make sure I don’t leave anybody out,” jokes Wilson.

At the UPS store he had mailed a shock destined for Vermont. Its recipient would be Steve Hibberd, the team’s shock guy.

Hibberd is a former employee of Orleans Racing, the Truck Series effort for Brendan Gaughan in the early 2000s that Wilson led. He’s one of Wilson’s two “secret weapons.”

The other is another Orleans team member and former Dodge employee, Ryan Isabel, who provides engineering support for the team in identifying trends via a database of car setups.

This small, spread out operation helped Sieg produce the best season in his six years of full-time Xfinity competition and his second playoff berth, following his 2016 campaign.

He enters Richmond with two top fives and nine top 10s (matching his top 10s from the rest of his Xfinity career). His previous best total for top 10s was three in 2016, the first time he went to the playoffs.

But Wilson, a former long-time employee at Richard Childress Racing who crew chiefed for Kevin Harvick and Clint Bowyer, doesn’t seem too stressed about the playoffs before him or his limited resources. In fact, he’s having his most fun in NASCAR in “a long time.”

For a former electrician apprentice from Vermont, he could be doing worse.

“Whenever I have a bad day in racing I think about running pipe in December in Vermont along the Connecticut River,” Wilson says with a chuckle.

Ryan Sieg has made the Xfinity playoffs for the second time in his career. (Photo by Adam Lacy/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)

Sieg and Wilson don’t want to hype up a potential Cinderella story for the Xfinity Series playoffs, even if it does have a few ingredients for that.

Sieg and his small team will start their playoff run at the track he had his best non-superspeedway performance earlier this year.

The April 12th race at Richmond saw Sieg start 13th, finished Stage 2 in fifth and then finish the race in fifth for his second top five of the year.

That leads into the Sept. 28 race on the Charlotte Roval. The opening round then closes out at Dover International Speedway.

Wilson sees the first round as three “opportunity races.”

“They’re not cookie cutter mile-and-a-halves, like Vegas,” Wilson says. “I really feel like we can go there and do well.

“I like road racing, Ryan doesn’t necessarily like road racing. I’m trying to get him in the state of mind and that’s a good opportunity race.”

But….

There are a few of those.

They make Wilson a “realist” about their situation, especially when it comes to facing the juggernauts of Joe Gibbs Racing, Team Penske and the other Cup-affiliated teams.

First, there’s the cars.

Those Cup-affiliated teams will likely be bringing new or updated cars to the track as the playoffs open.

Meanwhile, Sieg’s team will be using the same three cars they’ve been rotating through all year. Luckily for Wilson, they’re relatively new chassis the team purchased from Richard Childress Racing before this season, so he’s familiar with them.

“Here we will be running the same cars as we have been because that’s what we have,” Wilson says. “But I don’t think I’d ever switch that anyway, you gotta kind of ride the horse that got you there and try not to out trick yourself or race something that’s a little bit better cause you really need to bring something you know and that you’ve raced all year then see where you land.”

Then there’s the playoff points.

Sieg enters Richmond 11th in the standings with 2,001 points after the standings were reset. That one playoff point is a result of Sieg winning Stage 2 at Texas Motor Speedway in March.

“Looking at it, those top three cars (Christopher Bell, Cole Custer and Tyler Reddick) have such a big advantage, you almost have to pencil them into Homestead,” Sieg says. “To make it through the first (round), that’s what we want to do and need to do. But if we don’t, be consistent over the seven races and get top 10 in points, I think we got eliminated in the first round in 2016, but we still finished ninth in the standings. So it’s always nice to be top 10 in points. … Anything can happen.”

However, with all that, there’s one additional tool in the No. 39 team’s utility belt they didn’t have in April.

They return to Richmond with a Cup pit crew, which they began using in May at Charlotte.

Why is that notable?

Shane Wilson, right, has been a NASCAR crew chief since the early 2000s in Truck Series. (Photo by Chris Trotman/Getty Images)

“We lost I think 30 spots on pit road that first race and still finished top five,” Sieg says.

Well, maybe it felt like 30.

“It wasn’t quite 30, but it was like 17 though,” Wilson says with a hearty laugh. “Which is still a lot.”

Even with a more experienced pit crew, Sieg’s philosophy on what happens on pit road has been drilled into him.

“We don’t want to gain spots on pit road, we don’t want to lose any either,” Sieg says. “We just want to maintain. I bet you in my career if you counted the number of times I’ve come off pit road I’ve probably lost more positions than I want to count. That’s part of being a small team. If we come in eighth and Brandon Jones is ninth, he’s got a Joe Gibbs pit crew. If they beat us by two seconds, you’re going to lose that spot. I’ve kind of dealt with that a lot in my career. I’m not complaining, cause it’s part of what it is. So I just want to come in 10th and go out 10th. Yeah, it would be great to come out fourth, but that’s less realistic.”

And what if that Cup pit crew had been in place at Richmond six months ago?

“We might of won,” Wilson says. “Or we would have finished second. Because we passed two guys who finished in front of us about three different times. The only one we never passed was (winner Cole Custer).”

While advancing to the next round would be huge for Sieg’s team, Wilson’s goal for the next three races is straightforward: “finish ahead of four of those guys every week” and “accumulate enough points to make them have to race us at Dover.”

Liberty University extends William Byron sponsorship through 2021

Hendrick Motorsports
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Hendrick Motorsports announced Thursday that Liberty University has reached a two-year agreement to extend its sponsorship of William Byron and his No. 24 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 team.

After sponsoring Byron for 12 Cup races in both 2018 and 2019, Liberty University will continue to support the 2018 Cup rookie of the year for an additional 12 Cup races in each of the 2020 and 2021 seasons.

In his second season of driving in the Cup series for HMS, Byron is currently taking part in his first NASCAR Cup playoffs. He’s ninth in the standings after this past Sunday’s playoff opening race at Las Vegas.

We have been by William Byron’s side as he’s risen through the ranks at a young age, and it is an honor to continue to support one of our very own in his career,” Liberty University president Jerry Falwell said in a statement. “William and Hendrick Motorsports have always been a perfect fit for Liberty University. We share the same values and are committed to the same mission that makes champions on the racetrack and champions in life.”

The 21-year-old Byron is a junior in Liberty University’s online program, working on an undergraduate business communications degree. The school has been a sponsor of Byron’s since he drove late model stock cars in 2014.

Liberty University has been a big part of my racing career and progression through NASCAR from basically the beginning,” Byron said. “Their support on and off the track, including with my studies, has been monumental.

They’ve been with me through numerous accomplishments, including race wins and championships, and I’m glad we were able to add to that list this season by making it into my first Cup Series playoffs. I’m excited about Liberty being back on board with the No. 24 team, and I look forward to what the future holds for us.”

Weekend schedule for Cup, Xfinity at Richmond

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Friday night marks the opening race of the Xfinity Series playoffs, while Saturday night will be the second race in the opening round of the Cup playoffs.

Wunderground.com predicts a temperature of 74 degrees Friday with 0% chance of precipitation when the green flag drops. Christopher Bell won last year’s Xfinity race. Cole Custer won at Richmond in April.

Wunderground.com predicts a temperature of 79 degrees Saturday with 0% chance of precipitation when the green flag drops for the Cup race. Kyle Busch won last year’s race. Martin Truex Jr. won this spring at Richmond.

Here is this weekend’s schedule:

(All times Eastern)

Friday, September 20

8 a.m. – Xfinity garage opens

8:30 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. – Cup garage open

9:35-10:55 a.m. – Xfinity final practice (NBCSN)

11:35 a.m. – 12:25 p.m. – Cup practice (NBCSN, Motor Racing Network)

1:35 – 2:25 p.m. – Cup final practice (NBCSN, MRN)

4:35 p.m. – Xfinity qualifying impound (single vehicle/two laps all positions) (NBCSN)

5:45 p.m. – Xfinity driver/crew chief meeting

6:05 p.m. – Cup qualifying impound (single vehicle/two laps all positions) (NBCSN, MRN)

7 p.m. – Xfinity driver introductions

7:30 p.m. – Xfinity race (Stages 75/150/250 laps = 187.5 miles) (NBCSN, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio)

Saturday, September 21

1:30 p.m. – Cup garage open

5:30 p.m. – Cup driver/crew chief meeting

6:50 p.m. – Cup driver introductions

7:30 p.m. – Cup race (Stages 100/200/400 laps = 300 miles) (NBCSN/MRN/SiriusXM NASCAR Radio)

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Tune into NASCAR America presents MotorMouths at 5 p.m. ET on NBCSN

NBC Sports
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Today’s episode of NASCAR America presents MotorMouths airs from 5-6 p.m. ET on NBCSN.

Rutledge Wood will be joined by Kyle Petty and AJ Allmendinger.

In addition to discussing this weekend’s second race of the playoffs at Richmond Raceway, the guys will be taking your calls at 844-NASCAR-NBC or reach out on Twitter via #LetMeSayThis.

If you can’t catch today’s show on TV, watch online at http:/nascarstream.nbcsports.com. If you plan to stream the show on your laptop or portable device, be sure to have your username and password from your cable/satellite/telco provider handy so your subscription can be verified.

Once you enter that information, you’ll have access to the stream.

Click here at 5 p.m. ET to watch live via the stream.