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Friday 5: NASCAR ends practice of drivers sitting in cars to serve penalties

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The public shaming drivers, most notably Joey Logano, suffered last year because their cars did not pass inspection will not be repeated this season, NASCAR confirmed.

Logano was forced to sit in his car at the end of pit road for an entire 50-minute practice session in September at New Hampshire Motor Speedway because his car failed to clear qualifying inspection.

At one point, Logano’s wife delivered water as he sat strapped in the car in full uniform. The intent for such penalties was that since drivers are part of a team they should also suffer consequences when their cars failed to pass inspection in a timely fashion.

But the Logano spectacle turned the penalty into “a joke” as Logano called it that day after exiting his car in the garage.

NASCAR will change how it will enforce such penalties this year.

Teams still will be docked practice time but they will serve it in the garage instead of on pit road. Also, the driver no longer has to be in the car. Teams cannot work on the car while it is serving a timed penalty.

Also, teams will serve their penalties at the end of a practice session instead of the beginning. So, if a team has a 15-minute penalty, the driver must take the car back to the garage at that point, exit the car and the team is done for the session.

The move keeps cars from being parked on pit road, drivers sitting in them for 15, 30 minutes or more and people talking more about a car not on track instead of those that are practicing.

2. More details revealed on NASCAR’s new pit crew rules

When NASCAR announced in November that it was eliminating one person from going over the wall to pit the car, it led to many questions. At the time, NASCAR couldn’t answer all those questions as they were sorting through the details of allowing only five people to service the car.

NASCAR provided a few more answers this week.

What happens if a pit crew member is injured during an event?

That person can be replaced by a backup — even if they are assigned to another team. Say, a member of Stewart-Haas Racing’s pit crew is injured and cannot continue. SHR, which has provided pit crews to Front Row Motorsports, could take one member from that pit crew to replace the injured person. Front Row then would have to fill the open spot with someone who is listed as a pit crew member on a team roster.

OK, what about a situation like what happened at Texas in 2010 when Chad Knaus replaced all of his pit crew with teammate Jeff Gordon’s pit crew during a race?

Teams can make changes based on performance within their organization as long as they are on a roster. Recall, teams must submit a roster listing their pit crew, road crew and organizational members each weekend.

Previously it was stated that the fuel man can only fuel the car during a stop. Has that changed?

NASCAR remains steadfast in that the fuel man can only fuel the car — he is not allowed to make adjustments on the car or help with tires. The exception that NASCAR will allow is that the fuel man can kick a tire down in the name of safety — to avoid being hit by a tire.

Wait, there is a time when a fuel man can work on the car?

Yes. Say a team has damage and comes to pit road for repairs. A fuel man can go over the wall to help repair damage but cannot fuel the car during that stop. If a team changes only tires and doesn’t add fuel during a routine stop, the fuel man cannot go over the wall. No fuel, no fuel man over the wall — unless it is related to repairing damage.

3. “Jimmie Johnson rule” goes away

A controversial call NASCAR made last year in the playoff race at Charlotte won’t be repeated this season.

Jimmie Johnson started to pull out of his pit box before his team stopped him because of an unsecured lug nut. Johnson backed his car but it was not entirely in his pit stall when a crew member secured a lug nut on the left front wheel.

As it happened, many figured Johnson would be penalized for having work done on the car outside the pit box.

NASCAR did not penalize, stating that it had routinely allowed teams to secure a lug nut outside the pit box, calling it a safety issue.

All such work this season must be done in the pit box, NASCAR confirmed. If not, it’s a penalty.

Another change involves the fuel man. Previously, NASCAR allowed the fuel man to have the fuel can connected to the car and follow the car as it exited its pit stall. That no longer will be allowed. The fuel man must unplug the fuel can before the front of the car crosses over the edge of its pit stall or the team will be penalized for servicing the car outside the stall.

4. Maybe next year

One of the changes Denny Hamlin said the Drivers Council discussed last year was the choose rule. That’s what is used at short tracks.

The premise is that as drivers cross the start/finish line a lap before a restart, drivers have the option to choose if they want to start on the inside or outside lane. On a track where one groove is significantly better .

I know we talked a little bit about cone choose rule on restarts for some tracks,’’ Hamlin said of the Drivers Council. “That didn’t come forth this year. I know several of us were hoping so, being that there was such a disadvantage at some racetracks such as (you) happen to come off pit lane in the wrong lane, you’re not going to win the race, and that’s not necessarily fair.

“I think giving the drivers a choose rule would be something good to look forward in the future, but overall it’s status quo on the way the stages went. The cars are relatively the same, so there’s good momentum that we need to build on from last year.”

5. One last weekend …

This is the final weekend before NASCAR resumes at Daytona International Speedway. This also marks one of only two weekends without any of NASCAR’s three national series racing between now and the end of the season on Nov. 18.

The other weekend? March 31-April 1 because April 1 is Easter.

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Xfinity practice report from Kansas

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First Practice

Playoff contender Daniel Hemric posted  the fastest single lap in the first practice session for the Xfinity race at Kansas Speedway with a speed of 179.916 mph.

He beat fellow contender Christopher Bell (179.659 mph) by .043 seconds.

Tyler Reddick (179.474, playoff contender), Shane Lee (179.462) and Austin Cindric (179.408, playoff contender) rounded out the top five.

Playoff contenders Justin Allgaier (178.832) was seventh fastest, Cole Custer (178.725) was eighth, Matt Tifft (178.660) was ninth and Elliott Sadler (177.585) was the slowest in 13th.

Click here for complete results

 

Ryan Blaney tops first Cup practice at Kansas, Kyle Larson wrecks

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Ryan Blaney posted the fastest single lap in the first practice session for the Kansas Cup race with a speed of 192.130 mph. Blaney enters the weekend 22 points below the cutoff line.

He beat Kyle Busch (191.768 mph) by .053 seconds.

Kevin Harvick (191.761), Joey Logano (191.632) and Chase Elliott (191.421) round out the top five

Kyle Larson‘s weekend continues to worsen. With 15 minutes remaining in Friday’s practice session, he got loose and made heavy contact with the wall. Larson will have to roll out a back up car and drop to the back of the field to start the race. Larson (189.288) was 20th on the speed chart at the time.

Regan Smith was the only driver who posted 10 consecutive laps. His average speed was 182.606 mph.

Click here for complete results

MORE: Kyle Larson loses 10 points, car chief suspended for Talladega penalty
MORE: Kyle Larson’s team loses appeal 

Kyle Larson’s weekend gets worse at Kansas Speedway: backup car

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KANSAS CITY, Kan. — A must-win situation for Kyle Larson got even tougher Friday afternoon at Kansas Speedway.

The Chip Ganassi Racing driver slammed the Turn 2 wall during the opening Cup practice for Sunday’s cutoff race at the 1.5-mile oval, sustaining enough damage on the No. 42 Chevrolet to require a backup car. Larson said he was OK after a hard impact that he attributed to “really cold temperatures, really fast speeds and trying to get all you can.

“Yeah, I’m good,” Larson told NBCSN’s Dave Burns. “Just mad at myself for making a mistake. Got loose. I don’t know if I got on the splitter, but it didn’t turn and went straight.

“I hated we wrecked the primary car there. I’m sure the backup car will be fine. I’ve been in a backup car before here and went fast. Dig deep, work hard and see where we’ll be Sunday.”

Larson is 36 points below the cut line and 11th in the standings after a 10-point penalty at Talladega Superspeedway for an illegal repair to his damaged car. Only eight of the remaining 12 playoff drivers will advance after Kansas.

Chip Ganassi Racing lost its initial appeal of the penalty Friday morning at the track. Its final appeal will be heard Friday night.

During a media availability before practice, Larson said he viewed Kansas as a win-or-else proposition regardless of his points deficit. He led a race-high 101 laps and finished fourth in the May 12 race with what he believed was the best car

“In our position, we know what we have to do, I can be aggressive and run hard all race long,” he said. “At Chip Ganassi Racing, the mile-and-a-half tracks have been our best tracks. I know we’ll be fast and lead laps, and we just have to capitalize on that and win the race.”

Spencer Gallagher will not race for GMS Racing in 2019

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KANSAS CITY, Kansas – Spencer Gallagher announced Friday that he will not return to the No. 23 Xfinity car for GMS Racing after this season.

Gallagher said he would take a more managerial role in his family’s GMS Racing team. He said the team has not selected a replacement. He also said that team will continue to field entries in the Truck Series.

Gallagher has one career Xfinity win in 55 career starts. He won at Talladega in April. Shortly after he was suspended indefinitely for violating NASCAR’s substance abuse policy. He returned at Kentucky in July. He said he has no plans to race again, although he didn’t rule out a possible Truck race at some point.

“Trust me when I say this is the hardest decision I have ever had to make and I do not make it lightly,” Gallagher said Friday at Kansas Speedway. “At the end of the day, this came down to what do I want for my future, what do I want for GMS’ future and how can I grow this team and this sport. Candidly, the problem with being a driver is if you’re going to be a driver, that’s generally all you can be. … If you’re going to be a driver, at least to my mind, you need to be a race car driver from the time you wake up at 6 a.m. Monday morning to the time you go to bed at 10 p.m. Sunday night.

“There’s absolutely no off-time. You have to be totally focused and totally committed every second of the day to pushing yourself and your team to finding that last little tenth. That can be a really time-consuming process as fun as it is. It doesn’t leave a lot of room for any other ventures to go on and I make no bones about it I’m a businessman’s son. At the end of the day I see opportunity out here and I feel a calling within me to go chase it to benefit myself and benefit our sport.

“I think, candidly, this sport could use young fresh minds in leadership roles that are not afraid to go out and try to change things up and try to find something that works that helps all of us out. That’s what I see. I came here 10 years ago and I fell in love with this sport, with this business. I want to help it thrive. I believe, more so than in the seat, that’s where my real skill set lays.

“I’ve got a lot of connections still back in Silicon Valley. Racing can be a unique crucible again for proving out a lot of automotive technologies that are getting ready to hit us.”