Bump & Run: Did NASCAR handle Jimmie Johnson’s pit stop correctly?

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Should NASCAR have told all teams that it would allow lug nuts to be secured even if done outside a team’s pit stall without penalty, as happened with Jimmie Johnson at Charlotte, or is that a team’s responsibility to seek such information?

Steve Letarte: I spent a lot of time going through the rule book. According to 10.9.7 Vehicle Positioning Within the Pit Box, subsection D, I feel that the 48 didn’t deserve a penalty. I think they were well within their right. But the followup is that if Chad Knaus and Jimmie Johnson, two people that I hold in very high regard, didn’t understand that rule and there had to be conversations with NASCAR, then I do think it’s NASCAR’s responsibility in today’s world of communication and how easy it is … that perhaps a simple e-mail blast explaining the rule or letting them know that were questions of the rule and to come to the NASCAR tailer if you have questions would have been a good solution.

Nate Ryan: Normally, it would be a team’s responsibility to seek rulebook clarifications – in fact, it’s a regular occurrence for teams to get new parts approved by NASCAR before presenting them for racetrack inspection. But this isn’t about gaining a competitive advantage and wanting to protect proprietary information or trade secrets. This is ostensibly about safety, as NASCAR explicitly has stated numerous times since Sunday’s race.

Dustin Long: NASCAR has stated safety as a reason for not penalizing Jimmie Johnson’s team on that pit stop. If that’s the case, isn’t it the responsible thing for the sanctioning body to inform all teams they can tighten a lug nut outside their pit box? 

How far will Chase Elliott, who has three runner-up finishes in the first four playoff races, advance in the postseason?

Steve Letarte: I think Chase will make the Round of 8, but I don’t think he’ll get out of the Round of 8. I think making it that far is very impressive. He’s really stepped his game up.

Nate Ryan: Based off the past four races, at least the Round of 8, but the confidence seems to be there for a run to the championship. To get there, though, he probably will need to score his first victory.

Dustin Long: I’ve been impressed with the speed he’s shown in the playoffs after Hendrick Motorsports’ struggles earlier this year. I think he will make the Round of 8, but he and his team will have to show me more before I would pick them to make it to Miami for the finale.

What is one thing you will be watching closely in the final two races of the Round of 12?

Steve Letarte: I think it starts this Sunday. I want to see how aggressive the 12 playoff drivers decide to go for stage points at the end of Stage 1 at Talladega. I think that will be the defining moment of this entire playoff. I think it will be the defining moment of this new points system, and I expect to see chaos and chaos early at Talladega and that’s what I’m going to be watching.

Nate Ryan: How Kyle Busch’s team manages its approach and strategy. After his wipeout at Charlotte, Busch will be the first test case of whether a driver with a significant playoff points bulge still can overcome one bad race. In the past three seasons, the next two races would be virtual must-win situations. Now it’s worth asking if Busch essentially lays up and conservatively races for points (though Talladega makes that scenario very tricky).

Dustin Long: I want to see who starts to step up. Hendrick Motorsports has so far. Will that continue and can that team step up enough to challenge the Toyotas of Martin Truex Jr. and Joe Gibbs Racing and Kyle Larson?