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Here’s everything you need to know about Xfinity Series playoff opener at Kentucky

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The NASCAR Xfinity Series kicks off its seven-race playoffs Saturday night at Kentucky Speedway in the VisitMyrtleBeach.com 300.

Thanks to our friends at Racing Insights, here’s a primer on the race, the 12 drivers that have qualified for the playoffs, and the history of Kentucky Speedway:

Kentucky Notes

  • This weekend’s race is the 23rd NXS event at Kentucky Speedway and the first of the 2017 Playoffs
  • The stage end laps for this weekend’s race are lap 45, lap 90 and lap 200
  • 2017 is the sixth season where the NXS will race twice a year at Kentucky, Kentucky will host only one race in 2018
  • The first NXS race at Kentucky was in June 2001 and was won by Kevin Harvick
  • The last eight races at Kentucky were won from a top-seven starting position
  • 20 of the 22 NXS Kentucky races were won from a top-10 starting position including eight from pole
  • Kyle Busch, with two, is the only repeat winner at Kentucky in the last seven races
  • Joe Gibbs Racing drivers won the pole for the last four races at Kentucky with three different drivers
  • Joe Gibbs Racing (five), Team Penske (five), Richard Childress Racing (three) and JR Motorsports (two) combined won the last 15 NXS races at Kentucky
  • The pass for the win came in the final nine laps in five of the last seven races at Kentucky
  • The winner of only two of the last 10 races at Kentucky got his first win of the season
  • Two races at Kentucky ended in an overtime finish (9/15 and 7/16)
  • The driver leading the most laps won only two of the last seven races at Kentucky
  • There were 12 cautions in this race last year, the most ever in a NXS race at Kentucky, the average green flag stretch was 10 laps
  • The track record set July 2016 of 187.318 mph (28.828 seconds) by Kyle Busch was over six MPH faster than the prior track record set in June 2005 by Carl Edwards (181.287 mph, 28.787 seconds)
  • Eight of the last 11 poles at Kentucky were won by Non-Cup Competitors
  • 11 of the 22 NXS Kentucky races were won by Non-Cup Competitors including six of the last 11
  • Elliott Sadler led only 11 laps when he won at Kentucky last September, the fewest led by a winner in the last 16 races there
  • The final green flag stretch was nine laps or less in seven of the last nine races at Kentucky
  • Austin Dillon, 2012, is the only driver to sweep both races at Kentucky in a season; his first two NXS wins came at Kentucky in 2012
  • There were eight speeding penalties at Kentucky in July, more than the prior three races at Kentucky combined
  • The last driver to recover from an in race infraction at Kentucky to go on to win was Joey Logano in June 2009 who rebounded from a speeding penalty to win
  • Joe Gibbs Racing drivers led 437 of the 601 laps raced at Kentucky since the repave prior to 2016 (73%)
  • Ryan Blaney is the only driver to finish in the top-10 in all three races at Kentucky since the reconfiguration

1.5 Mile Track Highlights

  • This weekend’s race is seventh race on a 1.5 mile track in 2017
  • Five of the seven Playoff races in 2017 are on 1.5 mile tracks
  • Justin Allgaier won at Chicagoland last week from a starting position of 14th, the only race won from outside a top-10 starting position on a 1.5 mile track in the last 24 races
  • Five drivers won the six races on 1.5 mile tracks in 2017, Kyle Busch with two is the only repeat winner
  • Only two of the last 10 races on 1.5 mile tracks were won by Non-Cup competitors (Justin Allgaier at Chicagoland in 2017 and Daniel Suarez at Homestead in 2016)

Who is Hot Entering Kentucky:

No. 20 Ryan Preece

  • Won at Iowa and finished second at New Hampshire in his two starts in 2017, both with JGR
  • Finished 15th and 30th in his two NXS Kentucky starts
  • 15th place finish at Kentucky in July 2016 is his best finish on a 1.5 mile track

No. 3 Brian Scott

  • Finished third at Iowa in 2017 in his only start of 2017
  • Finished Kentucky best second in September 2014, one of two top-10 finishes at the track
  • Finished top-10 in each of his last two starts on 1.5 mile tracks but his last was at Homestead in Nov. 2015

No. 22 Sam Hornish Jr.

  • Won two of his last seven starts including a win at Mid-Ohio in his last
  • Finished top-10 in five of his six NXS Kentucky starts with a best finish of second in September 2012
  • Making his first NXS start on a 1.5 mile track since finishing fourth in this race last year

No. 7 Justin Allgaier (Second in playoffs)

  • 13 top-10s in 2017 with two wins (Phoenix and Chicagoland)
  • 495 laps led in 2017 are his most ever in a single season
  • Finished top-10 in five of the last seven races of 2017
  • Six top-10 finishes in 10 NXS Kentucky starts
  • Top-10 finishes in three of the last five races on 1.5 mile tracks including his win at Chicagoland last race

No. 9 William Byron (First in playoffs)

  • Won three of the last 13 races of 2017
  • Finished in the top-10 in 11 of the last 14 races (finished 25th at Mid-Ohio, 22nd at Bristol and 33rd at Chicagoland)
  • Finished seventh at Kentucky in July in his only NXS start at the track
  • Won the 2016 Truck race at Kentucky
  • Best finish in the NXS on a 1.5 mile track is seventh (three times)

No. 00 Cole Custer (Eighth in playoffs)

  • 13 top-10 finishes in 2017 including four top-five finishes
  • Finished top-10 in seven of the last 10 races of 2017
  • Led 41 laps last race at Chicagoland, more than he had in his career prior
  • Has never finished in the top-10 at Kentucky (finished 32nd and 11th in his two NXS starts there and 14th in his only Truck start there)
  • Five top-10 finishes in 10 starts on 1.5 mile tracks with a best of fourth at Charlotte in May 2016

No. 1 Elliott Sadler (Third in playoffs)

  • 19 top-10 finishes and 11 top-five finishes in 2017 lead all drivers
  • Regular season champion
  • One win (9/16) and eight top-10 finishes at Kentucky in 12 starts
  • Finished third at Chicagoland last race, his 11th top-10 finish on a 1.5 mile track in the last 13 races

No. 48 Brennan Poole (Fifth in playoffs)

  • Finished top-10 in seven of the last 10 races of 2017, 12 times total
  • Won his first NXS pole at Daytona-2
  • Two top-10 finishes in five NXS Kentucky starts
  • 2014 ARCA win at Kentucky
  • Only one top-10 finish on a 1.5 mile track this season (eighth at Charlotte)

No. 21 Daniel Hemric (Fourth in playoffs)

  • Finished top-10 in 12 of his 26 NXS starts with a best finish of second at Mid-Ohio
  • Finished top-10 in six of the last nine races of 2017
  • Three of his five top-five finishes in 2017 came in the last six races
  • Three top-10s in the six races on 1.5 mile tracks in 2017 (best of fourth at Chicagoland last race)
  • Finished ninth at Kentucky in July in his only NXS start at the track

Not Hot Entering Kentucky:

No. 42 Tyler Reddick

  • Three top-10 finishes in 2017 in 14 starts but none in his last five starts
  • Finished 10th at Kentucky in July in his only start at the track in the NXS, it was his last top-10 finish
  • Finished 10th in two of his three NXS stats on 1.5 mile tracks

No. 62 Brendan Gaughan (11th in Playoffs)

  • Only seven top-10 finishes in 2017, had 13 through 26 races in 2016
  • Matched his best finish of 2017 at Road America (fifth)
  • Eight top-10 finishes at Kentucky are his most of all tracks
  • Last NXS win came at Kentucky in this race in 2014
  • Finished ninth at Charlotte, only top-10 finish on a 1.5 mile track this season

No. 5 Michael Annett (12th in Playoffs)

  • Finished NXS best second at Road America but it is his only finish better than 12th in the last 12 races
  • Only three stage top-10 finishes in 2017, all three on plate tracks
  • Five top-10 finishes at Kentucky are his most on a track
  • Only two top-15 finishes on 1.5 mile tracks this season

No. 23 Spencer Gallagher

  • Finished 10th at Richmond in April, his second career top-10 finish, but has only four top-15 finishes this season
  • Finished 14th at Chicagoland, his best finish in the last 10 races
  • Finished 13th at Kentucky in July in his only NXS start there, his second best finish of 2017
  • Finished top-14 in three of the last four races on 1.5 mile tracks

No. 33 Brandon Jones

  • Only three top-10 finishes in 2017 and none in the last seven races
  • Had 11 top-10 finishes after 26 races in 2017 and was in the playoffs
  • Finished 12th at Chicagoland, his best finish in the last seven races of 2017
  • Finished fifth at Kentucky in September 2015, his only top-10 finish in four starts
  • Only one top-10 finish in the last 11 races on 1.5 mile tracks

No. 16 Ryan Reed (Sixth in playoffs)

  • Has a win and five top-10 finishes in 2017
  • Finished 12th at Richmond, his best finish in his last eight races
  • Finished seventh in this race last year, his best finish in seven Kentucky starts
  • Only two top-10 finishes on 1.5 mile tracks but both came in the last 11 races

Warm Entering Kentucky:

No. 11 Blake Koch (Ninth in Playoffs)

  • Only four top-10 finishes in 2017 but three of the four came in the last eight races
  • Finished top-14 in seven of the last eight races of 2017 including the last six
  • 11 NXS Kentucky starts with a best finish of 11th in this race last year
  • Two top-10 finishes on 1.5 mile tracks (ninth at Kansas in 10/16 and ninth at Chicagoland 9/17)

No. 19 Matt Tifft (10th in playoffs)

  • Seven top-10 finishes in 2017
  • Finished top-10 in three of the last six races of 2017 including his career best finish of third (twice)
  • Finished top-15 in all three starts at Kentucky, his most of all-tracks, including two top-10s (best of fifth in this race last year)
  • Six top-10 finishes in 12 starts on 1.5 mile tracks

No. 18 Kyle Benjamin

  • Started on the front-row in all four NXS starts but has only one top-15 finish (second at Iowa2)
  • Making his first NXS start on a 1.5 mile track

Also in playoffs:

No. 51 Jeremy Clements (7th in playoffs)

• Win at Road America put him into the Playoffs and gave him his five Playoff points
• Finished the regular season 17th in points
• One top-five finish and two top-10 finishes in 2017 (win at Road America, seventh at Iowa1)
• 13 NXS Kentucky starts with a best finish of 12th (twice) including this race last year
• Best NXS final season point ranking prior to 2017 was 14th in 2012 and 2015

Recent NXS Trends

  • 14 different drivers won the 26 races in 2017
  • Nine races in 2017 were won by Non-Cup Competitors, five of the nine were won by JR Motorsports drivers
  • Seven of the last 13 races of 2017 were won by Non-Cup Competitors
  • The driver leading the most laps failed to win in seven of the last 11 races including the last four
  • 15 of the last 17 races of 2017 were won from a top-eight starting position, Jeremy Clements won from 24th at Road America (the lowest starting position of a race winner this season) and Justin Allgaier won from 14th at Chicagoland last race
  • Six of the last 11 races of 2017 were won from pole
  • The final green flag stretch was eight laps or less in six of the last eight races of 2017
  • The final green flag stretch at New Hampshire was 104 laps, the longest green flag stretch in a race this season
  • Five races in 2017 were won by drivers rebounding from pit road infractions: Ryan Reed at Daytona (Crew over wall too soon), Kyle Larson at Auto Club Speedway (Speeding), Erik Jones at Bristol (Speeding), Kyle Busch at Watkins Glen (Drove thru too many boxes) and Kyle Busch at Bristol-2 (Speeding)
  • Two races in 2017 were won from drivers starting in the rear under penalty: Ryan Blaney at Charlotte and William Byron at Daytona2
  • Sam Hornish Jr.’s pole time at Mid-Ohio set a new track record, Brad Keselowski’s round one time set a new track record at Las Vegas, Kyle Larson’s pole winning time at Bristol set a new track record
  • 19 stages in 2017 were won by NXS eligible drivers: Elliott Sadler (five), Justin Allgiaer (three), William Byron, Daniel Hemric and Blake Koch (two), Darrell Wallace Jr. , Brendan Gaughan, Ryan Preece, Sam Hornish Jr. and James Davison (one)
  • Nine of the 26 races in 2017 were slowed due to red flags
  • There were 12 cautions at Charlotte, most in a race this season
  • There were only three cautions at Pocono, New Hampshire and Richmond2, the fewest in a race this season
  • Five races in 2017 ended with an overtime finish (Daytona-1, Richmond, Daytona-2, Iowa-2 and Darlington)
  • 11 of the 25 poles in 2017 were won by Non-Cup competitors
  • Eight drivers won their first pole in 2017, only one driver got his first pole in 2016 and only two in 2015
  • The pass for the win came in the final 10 laps in 10 of the 26 races this season and in the final four laps seven times
  • Two races in 2017 ended with a last lap pass for the win (Pocono and Michigan)
  • Four races in 2017 had issues with weather: Bristol (slowed mid-race), Daytona2 (started one day, completed another and slowed mid-race), Kentucky (postponed from Friday night to Saturday), New Hampshire (slowed mid-race)
  • Only twice has a driver swept both stages and won the race: Brad Keselowski at Pocono and Kyle Busch at Bristol-2

NXS 2017 Season Breakdown:

* Different Winners: 14
* Different Pole Winners: 15
* Non Cup Winners: 6 (William Byron-3, Justin Allgaier -2, Sam Hornish Jr., Ryan Preece, Ryan Reed and Jeremy Clements-1)
* Most Wins: 5- Kyle Busch
* Most Poles: 7- Kyle Busch
* Most Runner Ups: 5 – Ryan Blaney
* Most Top-fives: 11 – Elliott Sadler
* Most Top-10s: 19 –Elliott Sadler
* Most Laps Led: 731 – Kyle Busch

Among NXS Eligible Drivers

* Most Stage Wins: 5- Elliott Sadler (Brad Keselowski has the most of all drivers with eight)
* Most Stage Top-fives: 24 – Elliott Sadler
* Most Stage Top-10s: 36 –Elliott Sadler

Best Finishing NXS Driver in each Race:
* Daytona: Ryan Reed 1st
* Atlanta: Elliott Sadler 5th
* Las Vegas: Justin Allgaier 4th
* Phoenix: Justin Allgaier 1st
* Auto Club Speedway: William Byron 5th
* Texas: Cole Custer 5th
* Bristol: Elliott Sadler 4th
* Richmond: Justin Allgaier 2nd
* Talladega: Elliott Sadler 2nd
* Charlotte: Cole Custer 7th
* Dover: Cole Custer 4th
* Pocono: Justin Allgaier 2nd
* Michigan: William Byron 2nd
* Iowa: William Byron 1st
* Daytona: William Byron 1st
* Kentucky: William Byron 7th
* New Hampshire: Ryan Preece 2nd
* Indianapolis: William Byron 1st
* Iowa: Ryan Preece 1st
* Watkins Glen: Justin Allgaier 4th
* Mid-Ohio: Sam Hornish Jr. 1st
* Bristol2: Elliott Sadler 3rd
* Road America: Jeremy Clements 1st
* Darlington: William Byron 5th
* Richmond: Daniel Hemric 4th
* Chicagoland: Justin Allgaier 1st

Track History

  • The founder and developer of Kentucky Speedway was Jerry Carroll the former owner of Turfway Park. The speedway is located in Sparta KY the county seat of Gallatin County the smallest county by land area in Kentucky. The county has under 9,000 residents. Sparta has an area of 5.6 square miles and a population under 300.The track has hosted the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series since the 2000 season and the NASCAR Nationwide Series since 2001. Indy Car races were held from 2000 to 2011.
  • Constructed on 850 acres, 63 miles from Louisville, 35 miles from Cincinnati, and 150 miles from Indianapolis, Kentucky Speedway is a 1.5-mile tri-oval with 14-degree banking in the turns and a 1,600-foot backstretch. The tri-oval is 57-feet wide and includes a 12-foot apron. The facility also includes a paved quarter-mile track. Ground was broke July 18, 1998; Opened June 16, 2000; Cost: $153,000,000. Was the largest excavation project ever in Kentucky. Nearly 7 million people live within a 100-mile radius
  • Kentucky Speedway opened with 66,000 seats, went to 106,000 Seats in 2011 and to 86,000 seats in 2017.
  • Parking For More Than 50,000 Cars (was 30,000 in 2011)
  • After many years of campaigning for a Cup race, the track was sold to Speedway Motorsports, Inc. (SMI) on January 1, 2009 for $78.3 million. On August 10, 2010, NASCAR announced a Sprint Cup Race at Kentucky Speedway in 2011 as part of a triple header weekend. The weekend took the place of the Chicagoland Speedway date, which moved to September to be the leadoff race in the 2011 Chase for the Sprint Cup. It was the first Cup race awarded to a track since 2001.
  • In June 2012 the State of Kentucky completed projects that expanded Kentucky Highway 35 to seven lanes, widened the I-71 ramp to Ky. Hwy. 35 to three lanes and constructed a pedestrian tunnel that connects the massive Ford Parking lot east of Ky. Hwy. 35 to Kentucky Speedway. In addition to acquiring and engineering 170 new acres for the Ford Parking lot, Kentucky Speedway converted 50 new acres of previously unusable land to parking and added gravel aisles to 100 acres of previously all-grass parking. In total, the projects yielded parking for an additional 20,000 vehicles compared to 2011 bringing the total to 50,000. These changes eliminated the horrendous traffic/parking snafus from the inaugural race in 2011.
  • Kentucky Speedway did a complete repave of the track for the 2016 season, and also reconfigured turns 1-2.
  • — Turn 1-2 banking changed from 14 degrees to 17 degrees
  • — Turn 1-2 narrowed from 74 feet to 56 feet
  • — Banking in the tri-oval was changed from 8 degrees to 8-10 degrees
  • — 3,200 feet of SAFER-Barrier was added
  • Kentucky Speedway added an additional surface repave in October 2016

Kentucky State Factoids

  • The Kentucky Derby is the oldest continuously held horse race in the country. It is held at Churchill Downs in Louisville on the first Saturday in May.
  • Chevrolet Corvettes are manufactured in Bowling Green.
  • The first Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant owned and operated by Colonel Sanders is located in Corbin, KY.

 

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All-Star Race buzz still has many in NASCAR talking

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The rules package and racing in Saturday night’s Monster Energy All-Star Race and Monster Open has many in the sport debating what to do next.

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR chief racing development officer, said Monday on “The Morning Drive” that series officials will meet Wednesday with industry officials to discuss the race and “see where we go from here.”

The Xfinity Series will run a similar package this season at Pocono (June 2), Michigan (June 9) and Indianapolis (Sept. 8) after running it only at Indy last year.

MORE: Transcript of NASCAR’s comments after the All-Star Race

While O’Donnell noted Saturday night that he would “never say never” to running what was used in the All-Star race again later this year in Cup, he said the focus was on 2019 for the package.

Marcus Smith, chief executive officer of Speedway Motorsports Inc., said he would be for running the package in Cup at Kentucky (July 14). Kentucky is the last 1.5-mile track on the schedule before the playoffs begin in September.

“Certainly that track has been a place where R&D for the rest of the sport has happened, and we’d be happy to have it again there,” Smith told NBC Sports about Kentucky. “Any mile-and-a-half track, whether it’s ours or not. My interest is in making the whole sport fantastic, and I think we’ve got great opportunities for that.’’

Car owner Joe Gibbs said after the All-Star Race that more evaluation is needed with the package.

“I think there’s a lot to talk about,” Gibbs told NBC Sports after the race. “I’m sure we’ll make a good decision. Everybody is going to work together. I think (the race) will be something that everybody evaluates and thinks about. I think there’s a lot to it that going forward in the future would be very different. Cars will have a chance to be in the wind tunnel and do all the things that we do with them.”

Todd Gordon, crew chief for Joey Logano, cautioned Monday on SiriusXM NASCAR Radio about a rush to use the package at other tracks immediately.

“You saw the race and as a team member you feel like, wow, there’s something there, but I think we’ve got to be smart about how we roll forward,” he said. “Sometimes that’s going to take more time than I think what our fan base is going to understand, but we’ve got to smart about how we look at this and what we can do with it. I think there’s potential there. If we just implement what we just did, I don’t know if we’re getting all the potential out of it.”

There also was quite a discussion on social media from several in the sport, from spotters and crew chiefs and more, about the racing and what to do next. Here’s what some were saying on Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 and on Facebook

NASCAR Next Driver Zane Smith Wins Menards 200 at Toledo Speedway

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NASCAR Next driver Zane Smith won the Menards 200 at Toledo (Ohio) Speedway Sunday by a margin of .773 seconds over fellow program member Chase Purdy.

Smith passed Purdy for second on lap 116 and then stalked and caught leader Chandler Smith – who is not related. When Chandler ran across the lapped car of Mike Basham, Zane pounced and made a three-wide pass.

In the second half of the race, the two NASCAR Next classmates swapped the lead with Smith grabbing the top spot for good with 15 laps remaining.

Zane Smith’s victory was his first since being named to the 2018 NASCAR Next class and the third win of the ARCA season in five races this year.

Smith won the Music City 200 April 7 on the Nashville (Tenn.) Fairgrounds Speedway, finished second in the Kentuckiana Ford Dealers 200 at Salem (Ind.) Speedway April 22 and won the General Tire 200 at Talladega Superspeedway April 27.

His Toledo win is the fourth consecutive first- or second-place finish in the ARCA Series for the 19-year-old driver.

Another NASCAR Next driver, Riley Herbst finished 19th. Herbst was involved in a lap 100 accident and finished 45 laps off the pace.

Winning becoming same old, same old for Kevin Harvick

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Winning is never mundane for a Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series driver, but it’s starting to look that way for Kevin Harvick.

After winning Saturday night’s All-Star Race, Harvick walked into the media center at Charlotte Motor Speedway notably subdued, which prompted a question regarding his seeming lack of enthusiasm.

“I got a 4-month old baby at home,” he said. “I showed up this morning. I held my little girl at, I don’t know, 7:30, 8 a.m. I drove to the race track. I practiced. I went back, watched my son’s baseball game. I drove back for the drivers meeting. I had four appearances. I sat and laid on the couch for an hour, watched the race. Then I came back out and did driver intros, ran the race.

“If your ass wouldn’t be tired by now, I don’t know who you are. But I’m beat. I felt like I gave it a full effort today. If I’m subdued, I’m sorry. I’m really happy that we won the race. I’m really excited for my team and organization and sponsors and everybody. But I’m tired. Got to remember, I’m old. When I leave here, I’m going to go home, I drink too many more of these Busch beers, I might be asleep in the car.”

Before he hauled his tired butt into the media center, Harvick did something no one thought possible in 2018. He drove away from the field in the All-Star Race with a new rules package that was supposed to keep that from happening.

In a race marked by a substantial amount of passing throughout the field, Harvick took the lead from Ricky Stenhouse Jr. on Lap 6 and built a sizable lead in the first of four stages.

After losing positions during the pit stop at the end of the first stage, Harvick had to fight his way through traffic and did not regain the lead until near the end of the third stage.

“Hey, everything’s going our way,” Harvick said. “We have really fast cars. Everybody is executing. The pit crew didn’t have a great first stop with the tire getting hung in the fender, but they rebounded with a great pit stop on the next stop and gained a spot or two there. That’s what you want out of an experienced team, whether it’s the pit crew, the crew chief, the driver. When something goes wrong, you got to be able to overcome it, refocus, move forward.”

It was Harvick’s sixth win of the year, and although it was a non-points event, it marks the second time this season that he has won three consecutive races – putting another stamp on his claim to be the most dominant driver on a weekly basis.

The trick to success is not to allow winning to become mundane – no matter how it looks to the competition or the fans.

“It’s racing like you’re losing,” Harvick said after winning his second career All-Star Race. “If you can trick yourself into doing that every week, not get too high during the highs, really feel like you need to keep pushing to make things better, that’s really the mindset that everybody has right now.”

It might be easy to dismiss his current string of success in the belief that Harvick, crew chief Rodney Childers and the No. 4 team have found something through the first 12 races of 2018 that everyone else is missing. And while that may be partially true in terms of his success in points paying races, that element was missing from his All-Star victory.

The commonality between Harvick’s win Saturday night and the five points victories so far this year is the dedication and experience of the team – something that predates 2018.

“I don’t feel like that’s really a different position than we’ve been in four out of the five last years,” Harvick said. “Last year was obviously a building year for us. I think that’s the one thing that is the great part about this team, is we’ve been in a position to obviously win the championship in 2014. ’15 had a great year, won a bunch of races. We’ve been in position to have been successful before. I think that the experience of the team and the organization and all the racers that come into that shop day after day kind of sets the tone of the expectations, but also having been in a lot of these situations before with each other.

“I’m proud of them all. That to me is more important than the money and everything that comes with it because everybody puts so much time with it. There’s nothing better than seeing them all high-five in Victory Lane.”

Two weeks after taking home one of NASCAR’s most distinctive trophies – a concrete Miles the Monster holding a diecast replica of the No. 4 car for is AAA 400 win – Harvick was excited to give his son Keelan another piece of art for his playroom.

“Man, I like the trophy, to tell you the truth. I’ll take the money, for sure. All the kids think it’s Lightning McQueen’s Piston Cup. I’m sure that’s (what) mine will think about it when he wakes up and sees it in the morning.”

Harvick’s son was impressed, but he is beginning to reassess his priorities. After waking up the morning after Kevin’s $1 million win, Keelan said “cool trophy where’s the money?”

Transcript: What NASCAR said about the All-Star Race

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After Kevin Harvick’s victory in the Monster Energy All-Star Race on Saturday night, the focus turned to what NASCAR will do next with the rules package that was used in the race and created closer competition.

Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR chief racing development officer, met with the media after the race and talked about the event, what NASCAR saw and what’s next. Here’s what he said:

STEVE O’DONNELL:  From an eye test, we were certainly pleased with what we saw.  I think you’ll hear drivers say directionally there’s some things we can look at.  We agree.  But would certainly say we’ve got to take time to digest what we saw, look at a lot of facts, see where we go from here.

THE MODERATOR:  We’ll open it right up for questions.

Q.  You obviously said there is some tinkering that needs to be done.  What kind of things are you looking at?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I think it’s really premature.  We just got off the racetrack.  It’s even going through the stats.  We haven’t had a chance to look through a lot.

I can throw one out.  We had zero lead changes at the loops last year.  I think we had 38.  That’s more than the last four years.  Pretty good data when you look at that.

You also look at being able to approach the leader, what are some of those challenges we may want to look at.  Certainly from first to tenth throughout the night, much closer.  At the end of the day the best teams and the best drivers are going to go out there and win.  We also saw that tonight.

Q.  Where do you go from here?  What would be the timeline if you wanted to integrate any of these concepts into the 2019 package?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Good question.  I think one of the things in getting to tonight and talking to the industry was we knew going in that we had a lot of data through what Eric did and a lot of CFT data.  Especially with the OEMs, a lot of things to work on.  Didn’t want to push too much with what we do because we didn’t know what we would see on track.

I would say now, directionally you do like some of the things you see, now you’ve got to get together with the industry, debrief like we always do with the race teams, the drivers, certainly listen to the tracks and the fans, then the OEMs, talk about how do we continue to look at this and look at it in a smart way, look at it in an efficient way.

Can’t really put a timetable on it other than we know we have some meetings set up that we’re contingent upon what we saw tonight.  Those will take place, then we’ll try to put a timeline together to look towards 2019.

Q.  For fans who watched tonight’s race and liked it maybe better than a normal mile and a half, would want to know why this can’t be implemented sooner, what would you tell them?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Well, I probably would wait to see that, first of all.  We just got done with the race.

I answered that with Bob.  We have a process in place.  Talk to the industry about what we wanted to do to see if even directionally this was right.  You don’t want to assume that what you put on track is going to be a home run.  We certainly hoped it would be, but there’s certainly some things that you look at that you could tweak if you went this route.

For us, we’ve got to take the time, be smart about this, really look at it, see where we can go from here.  But I think it’s fair to say that this is something we absolutely want to look at.

Q.  Talked to Martin Truex Jr., he said it was very racy.  He liked it, had some ideas obviously.  For you up in the box, you could see it like the rest of the fans, were y’all high-fiving, thinking we’re moving in the right direction here?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  That’s a good question.  I think no, we’re not high-fiving because we got to control ourselves up in the booth.  I think you judge it by the fans.  I think you look down the last 10 laps, everybody is standing up.  Marcus has a suite next to us.  I can say that last year’s All-Star Race was fairly silent.  Don’t know if everybody stood or everybody was even still there, but it was packed.  We heard screaming in the suite next to us.

People were enthused.  I think the one thing, you saw Kevin Harvick go out there and win, and he certainly dominated this year, but you didn’t know who was going to win that race in turn three.  You saw drivers out there competing.  You saw three lead changes in one lap at the end of the third stage.

A lot of drama built in.  For us in race control, I think you look at it and you certainly saw things every lap that you wanted to watch a number of spots on the racetrack.

Q.  Joey Logano mentioned earlier that this is naturally more exciting with everything that’s on the line and no points.  How do you kind of adjust how you view the excitement in this race compared to what you would see if you incorporated this package in an actual points race?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I think if you asked Joey Sunday night at the Coke 600 if he’s going to race just as hard, he is.  We have the best race drivers in the world that are going to go out there and go after it every lap.

This race package, it’s important for people to know, we saw a lot of things even coming into this about this being a superspeedway package.  That’s not the intent.  The intent for us was to really look at taking the best of our short tracks, taking the best of the superspeedways, trying to find that balance where you could bring the cars closer together.  You were not going to see, we didn’t expect to see, pack racing.  We expected the best cars would still win, but we thought they would be running close together.  We saw that tonight.  That was the goal of this.  The goal will be to continue to look at how we can continue to dial that in.

Q.  I understand what you’re saying about lead changes at the loops.  Harvick led the final 10.  It seemed like once the leader got up front, he was harder to catch.  Would that be something you would look to address?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Yeah, no, we’d absolutely look to address that.  You always want to see that.  I think Kyle Busch won the All-Star Race last year by 1.1, 1.2 seconds.  Tenth place was 1.5.  There’s a big difference there.  I think you knew on Lap 7 that Kyle Busch had won the All-Star Race.  I think we all knew that last year.

It was different this year.  But still certainly something when you look at this package, very similar to Indy last year, when you looked at the ability for someone to get up to the leader, then that stall, that is something we want to look at.

I’d go back also to looking at our guys with Eric and the crew.  This was a package really meant for the Indianapolises of the world, Michigans.  We wanted to try this at Charlotte to see what we could learn.  I think that’s part of what we would look at for sure.

Q.  Is it fair to say this package could be used again this season?  Is that in play?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I would never say never, but our intent is we’ve talked coming into this, was to try this here, then really take a deep dive into how do we make this the best package possible for 2019 if we liked what we saw.  Again, it’s still very early.  You all watched the race, we just watched the race as well, so we have to digest a lot of information and see where we go from there.

Q.  I think it’s fair to say bringing this to a mile and a half track compared to Indianapolis, being so flat, this package would behave differently.  Did it behave how you anticipated it coming in here or were there some things you may have been surprised by tonight?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Again, still fairly early.  I asked Eric in our really quick five-minute debrief, I think you’d say yes.  One of the things we looked at even prior to coming here was the wheel force data from the car.  Eric went out and looked at that.  It was almost an exact match for us coming in.  We felt like we were on the right track.  We felt like we’d see what we saw tonight.

I think the question mark was, can you potentially draft, if you got behind the leader, what would happen, could somebody really get away.  We saw a mix of that tonight.  I think it was stage two or maybe even in the open where a bunch of cars got loose but were able to get back up and close to the front.

A lot of things to look at throughout the field.  Could you move from back to front?  What could you do when you were out front?  So we’ll look at all those.  Each track has different characteristics, for sure.  I’d applaud the team for getting us here and really seeing I think the results we hoped we would see on track.

Q.  I saw the Truck race earlier this year in Vegas.  Did that spark some ideas about bringing that pack or closer racing to this track?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  That’s a great question.  I think if you look back to where we were 2013, 2014, we were more of a high downforce package, had a lot of discussions in the garage area about the racing, what we could do.  We chose to go all really low downforce at that point.  That mixture produced some good racing, but some challenges as well.

When we looked at that, one of the things was the speeds at which the cars were going.  If you look at Charlotte, Atlanta, higher speeds usually make it tougher to pass.  There’s usually one groove.

I think the angle we all looked at, certainly at least what I hear from our fan base is, I love the Trucks, Trucks are great.  I don’t really hear anybody talk about the speeds of the Trucks.  They say it’s great racing.  That was the goal tonight, too, is to put on a great race, but also be able to showcase the best drivers.  I think it did accomplish that still early.

But Kevin Harvick winning for us is by no means a negative.  It’s the best team right now.  He went out there and proved it.

Q.  If there is a big buzz off of this race and people did leave excited about what they saw and you want them to come back next week for the Coca-Cola 600 but they’re not going to see the same thing, does that hamstring NASCAR and the track?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I think it’s a fair question, but I’d also say that we’re proud of the race product that we have on track each and every week.  We always look to improve it.  One of the ways that you improve it and you do it in a smart way is to work collectively with the industry to make sure that you have all your bases covered.

The last thing for us to do would be to roll something out with a number of unanswered questions.  That would be the case if we did that.  We’ve got a lot of work to do.  We’ve got a lot of work to do on the garage area to make sure we’re on the right track.  We feel we are.  I want to make sure the OEMs are comfortable with where we’re going, the direction, so we continue to have that fair playing field across the board.

I would say certainly the direction that we saw tonight is one we would like to pursue, but you need to have continuing conversations.  Again, go back and really analyze everything that we saw.  It’s a one hour eye test for us.  We haven’t gotten into all the data as of yet.

Q.  When you woke up this morning, what was your mixture of excitement and nervousness for today, the significance of what you were trying to do today?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  A lot of prayers this morning probably.

You know, a lot of anticipation for the race because I knew how much work went into it, especially from our team.  So was certainly cautiously optimistic, but you never know, all kinds of things to look at.

Really just wanted to see it play out.  Knew that either way we would have a direction from this.  We would know that this is something we want to continue to pursue or we would also know that we collectively tried something and it’s not a direction we want to go.

I think all in all, was excited beginning of the race, honestly was excited throughout the race.  I thought every lap had something to watch out there on the track.

Q.  How many packages do you feel you can have in the sense of if you want to go this route, how many races would you want to use it, or are you looking for something you feel like you can use on short tracks, intermediate tracks, everything but Daytona and Talladega?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  Great question.  I think that’s one of the things when we analyze this.  We did a lot of work over the offseason, Bill, Gene, crew, with the engine builders, to look at how could we be more efficient with the engines.  This was not part of that.  When you look at this race, one of the challenges was are we going to create an entirely new engine package.  That is not the intent at all.

If we were to pursue this route, that’s one of the things we’d want to look at, is how do you keep potentially a restricted engine package, then just one other, not go to three different engine packages.  Very similar to the rules for the racecars, what they look like.  You want to be as efficient as you can, but also put on the best racing possible.  That’s something we’ve got to look at and make sure we can limit the number of packages, but certainly make it so that it’s the best racing possible for the race fans.

Q.  When you have these conversations in the future about this race package, what is going to be in terms of how should it put it?  The conversations that will be had in terms of what could work for a Charlotte and Michigan, then thinking what could be something similar that may work for Richmond or Bristol or Martinsville, or even one of the road courses?

STEVE O’DONNELL:  I would say it’s fairly simple when you think about all that.  I think the team owners, the tracks and everyone would say the same thing.  If Marcus Smith’s phone is ringing, I got to get to that race, I haven’t been in a while, that’s a good sign.  If NBC and FOX are calling saying that business is good, ratings are good, that’s a good sign.  If you’re seeing more sponsorship inquiries to the race teams, that’s a good sign.  That all comes from race fans speaking up.

If this is something the fans liked, hopefully we’ll hear that.  We’d continue in that direction.  But that’s ultimately how you dial in.  If it’s 36 different packages or if it’s three, you want to end up on the right one.

We believe we can keep it simple with the number of race packages we put together.  We want to be as efficient as possible.  Ultimately it’s about the fans and putting on the best race we can.

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