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Houston native David Starr proud of city in wake of Hurricane Harvey

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When it comes to his front yard located just north of Dallas, Texas, David Starr is a “clean freak.”

If the B.J. McLeod Motorsports driver has any free time, he can be found diligently making sure it looks perfect.

“I love mowing my grass,” Starr told NBC Sports. “I always have my grass manicured to the max. … It takes me a day to do my front yard. I like all my bushes perfect. You look at my grass, I got perfect lines in them. I wash my driveway, and I wash the street in front of my house.

“That’s my therapy.”

The therapeutic effects of his lawn were hard to come by for the 49-year-old Xfinity Series driver last week.

A native of Houston, Starr’s mind was on his former home and the natural disaster that has befallen the city and claimed the lives of at least 70 people to date.

It was just beginning the recovery and rescue efforts from Hurricane Harvey, the Category-4 storm that made landfall in southeast Texas while Starr raced at Road America in Wisconsin the previous weekend.

“It was hard to do it, you know what I mean?” Starr says. “Here I am, sun shiny day in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and I’m mowing my grass, trimming my bushes and my yard looks great. You can’t help but think about the people that their yards are the least of their worries. They’re trying to figure out what the next step is. It was tough, man. It plays on you emotionally just because you feel so bad.”

Starr says all of his family is accounted for, but one cousin “lost everything” and is living with his parents.

“In the big scheme of things I’ve got a lot of family there and everybody’s doing well and helping out,” Starr says. “It could have been a lot worse. It’s just amazing that much rain can fall and flood the fourth largest city in the United States.”

While at Road America, Starr’s attention was “glued” on the TV in his team’s hauler when he wasn’t practicing or racing his No. 99 Chevrolet.

A flooded street in Port Arthur, Texas, on Aug. 31. (Getty Images).

The images being transmitted from over 1,200 miles south showed streets and highways flooded to historic levels, air rescues and other surreal visuals in a place Starr called home until 1996.

Starr grew up in north Houston on Highway 45, near the Intercontinental airport and the Greenspoint Mall.

“They’re in locations where I grew up at,” Starr says. “They’re doing live remotes and you can see the grocery store where as a kid you went shopping with your mom with. Just all the different locations. Over there by the Astrodome and Meyarland, there was a race track called Meyar Speedway. That whole Meyarland area was under water.

Meyar Speedway was a half-mile asphalt track in southwest Houston where Starr was introduced to stock car racing through to his father, Jimmy Starr.

Though it closed in the late 70s, Meyar Speedway once hosted the most famous names in NASCAR: Petty, Allison, Foyt and more. It was the site of one Cup Series race in June 1971, the Space City 300, won by Bobby Allison.

For seven years, the elder Starr was part of the stock car scene as a member of the team owned by Houston orange juice magnate Gordon Van Liew.

“My dad got out of the sport when I was about 7 years old,” Starr says. “I was hooked. I have all the programs. All the drivers that raced at Meyar Speedway.”

Two years ago, Starr hosted a reunion for the veterans of Meyar Speedway, with 170 showing up.

“I thought if Meyar Speedway hadn’t been there (with) all those drivers that raced there, I might not be doing what I do today,” says Starr, who is 20 years, 442 starts and four wins into his NASCAR career.

“I fell in love with it as a little boy and I wanted to make sure I gave back. … A lot of the drivers are in their 80s and 90s. I had a lot of people hug me. Grown men in their 80s hugged me. They were in tears just to tell me thank you.”

Now with Houston and its citizens in need of help, Starr wanted to start giving back again as soon as he returned to Texas from Road America. But his father cautioned him against journeying to Houston.

“They’ve got the city closed down,” Starr recalls his father telling him. “I don’t think you guys could get here. Even by some chance you did get in here and you started helping people, you’ve got to race next week and you might get stuck in here. I reckon you’d probably be best if you stayed there with your family.”

After a week of physically being in Dallas and emotionally in Houston, Starr made his way to Darlington, South Carolina. He was met with his sport having fully embraced his home’s plight.

Ben Kennedy drives his special “Support Harvey Relief” car during the Xfinity Series race at Darlington Raceway. (Photo by Matt Sullivan/Getty Images)

“Texas Strong” stickers dotted all the cars. Ben Kennedy’s No. 96 Chevrolet was dedicated entirely to encouraging support of relief efforts. Elliott Sadler announced he would donate all of his race winnings to relief causes.

“It’s cool to come to Darlington, South Carolina, and man, your fellow competitors, your sport that you love and that you’re a part of really cares,” Starr says. “It meant a lot to me. I went over to and thanked Ben Kennedy and some of his team members for what their car looked like. It was just amazing.”

Though he hasn’t been able to make it back home in the immediate aftermath of Harvey, Starr and his wife, Kim, joined other members of the NASCAR community in helping relief efforts. They donated a “substantial amount of money” to the American Red Cross while also donating supplies.

When Starr watched the TV in his hauler, in the midst of images showing chaos and despair were just as many showing hope and heroism.

“One of the things I was really proud of as all this was happening and I was tuned into television, watching everything, was all the people helping everybody,” Starr says. “It was really touching. It didn’t matter what your nationality was or the color of your skin was. It was really cool. That makes you really proud of all the people, the different cultures that live there. … It was just like, man, you are all Houstonians and it was just cool to see everybody helping everybody and rescuing people. It was very touching.”

Once Starr is done with is racing duties next weekend at Chicagoland Speedway, he plans on finally joining those in Houston and doing what he can.

“I got some friends that are helping some other friends,” Starr says. “These are high school buddies. Helping some other people work on their houses. I’m going to go down there and just help out for three or four days. Just lend a helping hand, see if I can make a difference in somebody’s life.”

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Tony Stewart: Clint Bowyer ‘has got to take his helmet off’ for a fight

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Tony Stewart was in a “virtual black hole of cell signal” in Waverly, Ohio, last Saturday when Clint Bowyer ran to Ryan Newman‘s car after the All-Star Race and threw punches in his driver-side window.

Stewart, who was competing in and won a sprint car race at Atomic Speedway, was ignorant of this fact until he was miles away from the track and had a better cell signal.

“I got five miles down the road and all of a sudden I’m getting all these texts,” Stewart said Wednesday after being elected to the NASCAR Hall of Fame. “I’m going, ‘How do all these people know we won that fast?’ It wasn’t about us, it was about Clint’s deal. Finally got another five miles down the road, had a real signal. Somebody goes ‘Look at Twitter.”

That’s when the co-owner of Stewart-Haas Racing saw the video of Bowyer, still wearing his helmet, furiously throwing both fists at Newman, who still sat in his car.

Bowyer was angry with Newman after contact between them on the cool-down lap after the race had sent Bowyer’s No. 14 Ford nose-first into the wall.

“That kid has got to take his helmet off if he’s going to fight,” Stewart said. “Kids leave their helmets on to fight. Men take their helmets off and they fight. If you’re going to fight, fight.”

While still on the highway Saturday night, Stewart let Bowyer know his thoughts on his fighting form.

“Listen, take your helmet off if you’re going to get into a fight,” Stewart texted Bowyer.

Bowyer responded by saying “I didn’t have time.”

Stewart, who has a long history of driver altercations and arguments, then offered his driver more encouraging wisdom.

“Don’t lose that passion to fight for what you believe in,” Stewart said.

Social media salutes NASCAR Hall of Fame Class of 2020

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Social media quickly rose to congratulate the five men named Wednesday to the NASCAR Hall of Fame Class of 2020: Tony Stewart, Buddy Baker, Joe Gibbs, Bobby Labonte and Waddell Wilson.

Here are some of the more noteworthy posts from Twitter:

 

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Nate Ryan’s ballot for the 2020 NASCAR Hall of Fame class

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Nate Ryan cast a ballot Wednesday for the NASCAR Hall of Fame as NBC Sports’ digital representative.

It’s the 11th consecutive year of voting for Ryan, who is one of 59 members of the NASCAR Hall of Fame voting panel (including one online vote determined by fans; two voters, Ricky Rudd and Waddell Wilson, recused themselves because they were on the ballot).

A maximum of five votes may be cast from a list of 20 nominees (this was the first year in which Ryan voted for fewer than five)

His ballot for the 11th class (followed by his ballot for each of the preceding 10 years, which included six at USA TODAY Sports):

  1. Tony Stewart: Three Cup championships, 49 victories and two Brickyard 400s (plus an IndyCar championship) are a testament to his boundless talent, but “Smoke” also has left a mark as an alluring and highly quotable superstar and a respected team owner. His irascible personality and tenacious grit provided some of NASCAR’s best moments of the past two decades.
  2. Buddy Baker: The winner of the 1980 Daytona 500 and 1970 Southern 500 was one of NASCAR’s home run hitters, counting several major wins among his 19 career victories on the premier circuit. One of NASCAR’s greatest ambassadors Baker also became a beloved broadcaster on TV and SiriusXM NASCAR Radio.
  3. Waddell Wilson: Perhaps the greatest across-the-board garage resume on this year’s ballot with three championships and 109 victories as an engine builder and 19 wins (including three Daytona 500s) as a crew chief.
  4. Joe Gibbs: Nine NASCAR titles (four in Cup; five in Xfinity) and his four-car team remains the class of the premier circuit. Deserves to be elected in the wake of contemporaries Rick Hendrick, Richard Childress, Jack Roush and Roger Penske being elected the last few years.

2020 Landmark Award: Ralph Seagraves

Ryan’s previous NASCAR Hall of Fame ballots:

2010: Dale Earnhardt, Richard Petty, Junior Johnson, David Pearson, Bill France Jr.

2011: Pearson, Darrell Waltrip, Cale Yarborough, Bobby Allison, Lee Petty

2012: Waltrip, Yarborough, Dale Inman, Raymond Parks, Curtis Turner

2013: Fireball Roberts, Turner, Fred Lorenzen, Herb Thomas, Tim Flock

2014: Roberts, Turner, Lorenzen, Flock, Joe Weatherly

2015: Lorenzen, Turner, Weatherly, O. Bruton Smith, Rick Hendrick

2016: Turner, Smith, Hendrick, Ray Evernham, Bobby Isaac

2017: Hendrick, Evernham, Benny Parsons, Parks, Red Byron

2018: Evernham, Byron, Robert Yates, Alan Kulwicki, Buddy Baker

2019: Jeff Gordon, Kulwicki, Baker, Davey Allison, Jack Roush

2020: Tony Stewart, Baker, Waddell Wilson, Joe Gibbs

LANDMARK

2015: Raymond Parks

2016: Raymond Parks

2017: Raymond Parks

2018: Ralph Seagraves

2019: Jim Hunter

Tony Stewart leads 2020 Hall of Fame Class

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Tony Stewart, the three-time Cup champion who took NASCAR by storm after transitioning from open-wheel racing, was elected to the NASCAR Hall of Fame’s Class of 2020 on Wednesday.

Stewart’s election comes two days after his 48th birthday.

Joining Stewart in the Class of 2020 are: Joe Gibbs, Waddell Wilson, Buddy Baker and Bobby Labonte.

The class, the eleventh elected to the Hall of Fame, will be inducted on Jan. 31, 2020.

Edsel Ford won the Landmark Award.

Stewart was selected on 88% of the 57 ballots cast. Gibbs and Wilson were selected on 72%, Baker was on 70% and Labonte was on 67%.

The next three top vote-getters were Mike Stefanik, Ray Fox and Hershel McGriff.

Results for the NASCAR.com Fan Vote, in alphabetical order, were Baker, Neil Bonnett, Harry Gant, Labonte and Stewart.

MORE: Nate Ryan reveals his Hall of Fame ballot.

“It’s very humbling, to be honest,” Stewart said on NASCAR America presents MotorMouths. “There are so many great people in this sport. … to be part of it and have all the great names that are in and the people that were going to be in in the future we’re going to be with, it’s an unbelievable feeling. But it is extremely humbling.

“A lot of it is really mixed emotions because I’m still in race car driver mode and car owner mode. I’m not even thinking about hall of fames. To be inducted earlier this year into the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America and now going into the NASCAR Hall of Fame, it’s just a very humbling experience.”

When asked what he would say to voters who didn’t select him, Stewart gave a typical Stewart answer.

“I don’t know but when I find out, I’m going to throw eggs at their front door tonight,” Stewart joked.

A native of Columbus, Indiana, Stewart’s election comes in his first year on the ballot. He retired from NASCAR competition at the end of 2016 with 49 Cup Series wins and three titles as a driver (2002, ’05 and ’11).

In 2014 he earned a fourth title in his role as co-owner of Stewart-Haas Racing.

After being crowned the 1997 Indy Racing League champion, Stewart split time in 1998 between the IRL and the Xfinity Series, competing for Joe Gibbs Racing. He moved up to Cup in 1999 and claimed the Rookie of the Year title after earning three wins. He was the first rookie to win a race since Davey Allison in 1987.

Stewart won two Brickyard 400s, four July Daytona races and eight road course races, including his final Cup win in June 2016 at Sonoma Raceway.

Stewart is one of the most prolific Cup drivers to never win the Daytona 500, joining fellow Hall of Famer Mark Martin in that category.

Nicknamed “Smoke,” Stewart is also one of four drivers to compete in the Indianapolis 500 and Coca-Cola 600 in the same day. He did it twice, in 1999 and 2001.

Stewart’s election also comes 27 years after he attended his first NASCAR race, the 1992 Cup finale at Atlanta Motor Speedway, as a 21-year-old wearing a $2,000 suit and trying to “impress people.”

“I thought like I was wasting my time being down there,” Stewart said in 2016. “I thought there was no way I was going to get an opportunity to come do this.”

Stewart will be joined in the Hall of Fame by Gibbs. Stewart raced for Gibbs in Cup from 1999-2009, and Labonte, his teammate at JGR until 2005.

“I couldn’t think of a better day than my boss, Joe Gibbs, or my teammate, Bobby Labonte, that was the one responsible to get me in to Joe Gibbs Racing to go in with those guys,” Stewart said on MotorMouths. “And Waddell Wilson, who was part of Ranier-Walsh Racing, who I drove for in ’96 before I drove for Joe. It really is a cool day, a cool day to be in with these guys.”

Gibbs, a NFL Hall of Fame head coach, entered NASCAR as an owner in 1992. Since then he has accumulated four Cup titles, five Xfinity titles and 157 wins. He was elected in his third year on the ballot.

Labonte was also elected in his third year on the ballot. The younger brother of Hall of Famer Terry Labonte, Bobby is a Cup (2000) and Xfinity champion (1991). He earned 21 Cup wins, including two Brickyard 400s and one Southern 500. His first win came in the 1995 Coca-Cola 600.

Wilson was three-time championship engine builder. He crafted the engines that won titles in 1968, ’69 and ’73. He also won the Daytona 500 three times as a crew chief winning with Baker in 1980 and Cale Yarborough in 1983-84.

Baker, known as the “Gentle Giant,” was elected in his sixth year on the ballot. Baker made 699 starts from 1959-92 and claimed 19 Cup wins, including one Southern 500 and two Coke 600s. After retiring he transitioned into TV, where he worked for TNN and CBS and later SiriusXM NASCAR Radio. Baker died in 2015 at the age of 74 after a battle with cancer.