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Houston native David Starr proud of city in wake of Hurricane Harvey

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When it comes to his front yard located just north of Dallas, Texas, David Starr is a “clean freak.”

If the B.J. McLeod Motorsports driver has any free time, he can be found diligently making sure it looks perfect.

“I love mowing my grass,” Starr told NBC Sports. “I always have my grass manicured to the max. … It takes me a day to do my front yard. I like all my bushes perfect. You look at my grass, I got perfect lines in them. I wash my driveway, and I wash the street in front of my house.

“That’s my therapy.”

The therapeutic effects of his lawn were hard to come by for the 49-year-old Xfinity Series driver last week.

A native of Houston, Starr’s mind was on his former home and the natural disaster that has befallen the city and claimed the lives of at least 70 people to date.

It was just beginning the recovery and rescue efforts from Hurricane Harvey, the Category-4 storm that made landfall in southeast Texas while Starr raced at Road America in Wisconsin the previous weekend.

“It was hard to do it, you know what I mean?” Starr says. “Here I am, sun shiny day in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and I’m mowing my grass, trimming my bushes and my yard looks great. You can’t help but think about the people that their yards are the least of their worries. They’re trying to figure out what the next step is. It was tough, man. It plays on you emotionally just because you feel so bad.”

Starr says all of his family is accounted for, but one cousin “lost everything” and is living with his parents.

“In the big scheme of things I’ve got a lot of family there and everybody’s doing well and helping out,” Starr says. “It could have been a lot worse. It’s just amazing that much rain can fall and flood the fourth largest city in the United States.”

While at Road America, Starr’s attention was “glued” on the TV in his team’s hauler when he wasn’t practicing or racing his No. 99 Chevrolet.

A flooded street in Port Arthur, Texas, on Aug. 31. (Getty Images).

The images being transmitted from over 1,200 miles south showed streets and highways flooded to historic levels, air rescues and other surreal visuals in a place Starr called home until 1996.

Starr grew up in north Houston on Highway 45, near the Intercontinental airport and the Greenspoint Mall.

“They’re in locations where I grew up at,” Starr says. “They’re doing live remotes and you can see the grocery store where as a kid you went shopping with your mom with. Just all the different locations. Over there by the Astrodome and Meyarland, there was a race track called Meyar Speedway. That whole Meyarland area was under water.

Meyar Speedway was a half-mile asphalt track in southwest Houston where Starr was introduced to stock car racing through to his father, Jimmy Starr.

Though it closed in the late 70s, Meyar Speedway once hosted the most famous names in NASCAR: Petty, Allison, Foyt and more. It was the site of one Cup Series race in June 1971, the Space City 300, won by Bobby Allison.

For seven years, the elder Starr was part of the stock car scene as a member of the team owned by Houston orange juice magnate Gordon Van Liew.

“My dad got out of the sport when I was about 7 years old,” Starr says. “I was hooked. I have all the programs. All the drivers that raced at Meyar Speedway.”

Two years ago, Starr hosted a reunion for the veterans of Meyar Speedway, with 170 showing up.

“I thought if Meyar Speedway hadn’t been there (with) all those drivers that raced there, I might not be doing what I do today,” says Starr, who is 20 years, 442 starts and four wins into his NASCAR career.

“I fell in love with it as a little boy and I wanted to make sure I gave back. … A lot of the drivers are in their 80s and 90s. I had a lot of people hug me. Grown men in their 80s hugged me. They were in tears just to tell me thank you.”

Now with Houston and its citizens in need of help, Starr wanted to start giving back again as soon as he returned to Texas from Road America. But his father cautioned him against journeying to Houston.

“They’ve got the city closed down,” Starr recalls his father telling him. “I don’t think you guys could get here. Even by some chance you did get in here and you started helping people, you’ve got to race next week and you might get stuck in here. I reckon you’d probably be best if you stayed there with your family.”

After a week of physically being in Dallas and emotionally in Houston, Starr made his way to Darlington, South Carolina. He was met with his sport having fully embraced his home’s plight.

Ben Kennedy drives his special “Support Harvey Relief” car during the Xfinity Series race at Darlington Raceway. (Photo by Matt Sullivan/Getty Images)

“Texas Strong” stickers dotted all the cars. Ben Kennedy’s No. 96 Chevrolet was dedicated entirely to encouraging support of relief efforts. Elliott Sadler announced he would donate all of his race winnings to relief causes.

“It’s cool to come to Darlington, South Carolina, and man, your fellow competitors, your sport that you love and that you’re a part of really cares,” Starr says. “It meant a lot to me. I went over to and thanked Ben Kennedy and some of his team members for what their car looked like. It was just amazing.”

Though he hasn’t been able to make it back home in the immediate aftermath of Harvey, Starr and his wife, Kim, joined other members of the NASCAR community in helping relief efforts. They donated a “substantial amount of money” to the American Red Cross while also donating supplies.

When Starr watched the TV in his hauler, in the midst of images showing chaos and despair were just as many showing hope and heroism.

“One of the things I was really proud of as all this was happening and I was tuned into television, watching everything, was all the people helping everybody,” Starr says. “It was really touching. It didn’t matter what your nationality was or the color of your skin was. It was really cool. That makes you really proud of all the people, the different cultures that live there. … It was just like, man, you are all Houstonians and it was just cool to see everybody helping everybody and rescuing people. It was very touching.”

Once Starr is done with is racing duties next weekend at Chicagoland Speedway, he plans on finally joining those in Houston and doing what he can.

“I got some friends that are helping some other friends,” Starr says. “These are high school buddies. Helping some other people work on their houses. I’m going to go down there and just help out for three or four days. Just lend a helping hand, see if I can make a difference in somebody’s life.”

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Saturday’s schedule at Daytona, including Xfinity season opener

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Here’s the schedule for today’s action at Daytona International Speedway, highlighted by the Xfinity Series season opener, the NASCAR Racing Experience 300:

(All times are Eastern)

8 a.m. – Xfinity garage opens

9:40 a.m. – Xfinity qualifying; single car/two rounds (Fox Sports 1)

10 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. – Cup garage open

11:30 a.m. – Xfinity driver-crew chief meeting

12:05 – 12:55 p.m. – Final Cup practice (FS1)

2 p.m. – Xfinity driver introductions

2:30 p.m. – Xfinity NASCAR Racing Experience 300; 120 laps/300 miles (FS1, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio)

Austin Hill wins Truck Series opener at Daytona in overtime finish

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Austin Hill won Friday’s Gander Outdoors Truck Series season opener at Daytona in an overtime finish, claiming his first career Truck Series win.

The win comes in Hill’s 52nd series start and his first with Hattori Racing Enterprises. Hill, a former member of the NASCAR Next driver program, took over for defending champion Brett Moffitt in the No. 16 Toyota.

Hill, 24, beat Grant Enfinger, Ross Chastain, Spencer Boyd and Matt Crafton in the second attempt at an overtime finish.

Hill, who is from Winston, Georgia, led 39 laps and survived a race that saw 11 cautions and 26 of 32 trucks involved in accidents.

“Man, this truck was fast,” Hill told Fox Sports 1. “I knew we had a truck that could compete. Got a little scared there at the end. I thought (Enfinger) was going to get me, he got a big run. We were able to protect it. I can’t believe my first win came at Daytona. It’s so surreal, I can’t wait to party with these guys.”

Hill’s win is the third in a row for Hattori after Moffitt won the last two races of 2018.

The overtime period was created by a wreck with two laps left in the scheduled 100-lap distance that involved 10 trucks and nearly every remaining frontrunner. The final restart was setup by a two-car incident on the first overtime attempt.

Only nine of the field’s 32 trucks took the final green flag.

“It was a crazy night … carnage everywhere,” Enfinger said. “We tore up a lot of crap tonight.”

STAGE 1 WINNER: Sheldon Creed

STAGE 2 WINNER: Johnny Sauter

Click here for the race results.

Click here for the point standings.

NOTABLE: Billy Rock, the jackman on the No. 28 of Bryan Dauzat, was awake and alert after he was hit on pit road early in the race by Dauzat, who had lost his brakes. Rock was transported to a local hospital … Angela Ruch, the niece of Derrike Cope, placed eighth in NEMCO Motorsports No. 8 truck. She is just the second woman to earn a top 10 in the Truck Series. Jennifer Jo Cobb placed sixth at Daytona in 2011.

NEXT: Active Pest Control 200 at Atlanta Motor Speedway at 4:30 p.m. ET on Feb. 23 on Fox Sports 1

Christian Eckes wins Truck Series pole at Daytona

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Christian Eckes won the pole for tonight’s Gander Outdoors Truck Series season opener at Daytona.

Driving the No. 51 Toyota for Kyle Busch Motorsports, Eckes posted a top speed of 182.604 mph.

It is the first career pole for 18-year-old Eckes in his fifth career start.

“I felt way more confident in our car in the draft yesterday,” Eckes told Fox Sports 1. “I really wasn’t sure where we would qualify but here we are on the pole.”

He will be joined on the front row by David Gilliland (182.556 mph).

The top five is completed by Todd Gilliland (181.686), Harrison Burton (181.357) and Grant Enfinger (181.349).

Burton will start from the rear after an engine change was made on his No. 18 Toyota on Thursday.

The race is scheduled to begin at 7:30 p.m. ET on Fox Sports 1.

Click here for the starting lineup.

Meet the ‘Gen 7 for NASCAR’ that could include shorter races and capped costs

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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Are shorter races better? That’s a discussion taking place in NASCAR, along with the length of the season and other key topics.

“We have to keep (fans) engaged,” car owner Jack Roush said Friday at Daytona International Speedway. “We have to think about their attention spans. The races may need to get shorter.  That could be cost savings all the way around. Probably need to get shorter. 

“People say we need to race fewer times. I’m not sure that’s true. I used to tell (NASCAR Vice Chairman) Mike Helton, if he had three or four races a week, I’d be there for him. I don’t know if I’d say that today.”

Already this week, Kevin Harvick has advocated eliminating the Clash, and Denny Hamlin has noted one of the most popular events in the Olympics is the 100-meter dash instead of the marathon, a hint to shorter races

These comments have been made as the sport looks to cut costs for teams and energize fans who can become weary over a 38-race season that goes from February to November. NASCAR President Steve Phelps said last year that various ideas would be considered for the 2020 schedule and beyond. 

Car owner Roger Penske, whose organization is coming off Joey Logano’s Cup championship season, likens the sport’s look at race lengths to its focus on the next car, which is targeted to debut in 2021.

“I think we’re really talking about Gen 7 for NASCAR,” Penske said, using the term for the next car. “It’s not just the car or the engine. I think it’s the show, it’s the length of the races, it’s where we’re going to run, are we going to run more at night, short tracks. Let’s call it Gen 7 for NASCAR, not just the car.”

A shorter season could limit how many weekends NASCAR goes head-to-head against the NFL in the fall. Shorter races could provide the opportunity for midweek races. The belief from those advocating shorter races is that it would create a better show for fans.

“I think it’s an exciting time for us really in the sport,” car owner Joe Gibbs said. “You know, there’s times that you struggle, and I think we have struggled some, but I honestly think (NASCAR Chairman) Jim France is on board and after it.  I think we, having constant meetings with everybody has kind of put everything on the table. 

“We’ve got a great fan base, but I think everything is really out there, scheduling, everything that you’re talking about, cost savings, everything is on the table. And so sometimes when you go through a tough time, those wind up being the best times because it causes you to really think your way through things.”

Just as important to teams are the costs, which NASCAR continues to look to cut. There’s also been talk of some type of spending limitation for teams.

“You’re going to see other things happen with the cars, engine packages, that’s going to reduce the cost,” car owner Rick Hendrick said. “So NASCAR is really on it. When you look at it, we talk about a spending cap. I don’t know how you regulate that with all we have going on. I mean, everything is on the table.”

Bob Jenkins, car owner for Front Row Motorsports, said cost containment can make an impact for his three-car organization.

“The ultimate goal has always got to be how can we do more with less with any team,” he said. “I think some of the larger teams have felt the financial pinch maybe more so than we have. When you’re in a constant evolution mode, it’s hard for us to keep up. We can make suspension changes a few times a year. Like Roger said, we can’t change cars every week.

“In previous years, we were always a generation or two behind and it shows on our performance. I think now when they come with these common parts that are produced by a third-party manufacturer that can’t be tweaked or re-engineered it only helps a team like us.”