Bump & Run: Is moving William Byron to Cup next year the right move?

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What do you think of William Byron’s move to Cup for 2018?

Dale Jarrett: I used to think that drivers needed more experience, a few years running in the Xfinity Series before they got into Cup because you kind of needed time to prove yourself there. A number of these young drivers, and William Byron being one of these, got an opportunity in a really good car right from the very beginning of his Xfinity career. He’s proven that he can race and win against the best out there, so why not? I would generally say that you need to stay there until you learn to win, and he already knows how to win against these guys. Go on and move. I’m all for it. Not that many are on that quick of pace to get there, but he’s certainly done it.

Kyle Petty: I think William Byron’s move to the Cup series is spot on! He’s won in every division he’s raced in, and not only won but contended each week. Why stay in a series if your ultimate goal is to race and win in Cup? My dad always said you learn habits racing in other divisions that don’t translate into the Cup series. His progress may take time, but ultimately the move now will pay off in wins and championships I believe.

Nate Ryan: Despite the comparisons to Joey Logano’s rookie season washout, Hendrick Motorsports is doing the right thing. If you think Byron is destined to win in Cup – and his performance in the Truck and Xfinity series the past two seasons certainly supports that belief – there is no point to delaying his promotion.

For every instance such as Logano’s (which really doesn’t apply because he unfairly was thrust into the untenable situation of replacing a champion with a high-profile sponsor and veteran team), there are several more that cast doubt on the importance of extra seasoning in the Xfinity Series.

Did staying an extra year in Xfinity after winning the championship as a rookie do much for Chase Elliott? Has Erik Jones suffered from only one full-time season? Did Xfinity experience mean anything to Ryan Newman, Jimmie Johnson or Kasey Kahne?

With two teammates in his age range and another who is a willing mentor (and a seven-time series champion), Byron will be nurtured at the correct pace for realizing his abundant talent.

Dustin Long: Byron’s overall experience can make one nervous, but he’s excelled in his limited time driving Trucks and in the Xfinity Series. He’s good enough that he made it worthwhile for Hendrick Motorsports to take Kasey Kahne out of the No. 5 car. It also doesn’t hurt that his salary likely will be a fraction what it is for a veteran driver such as Kahne. It’s understandable why Hendrick is making the move.

Considering how dominant Toyota has been lately, which would you take this weekend at Michigan – The field or Kyle Larson and Chase Elliott (who have two wins and three runner-up finishes in the last three Michigan races)?

Dale Jarrett: The field. I think things have changed. Both of those young guys have been outstanding there and proven to be the ones to beat. I just believe that the Toyotas have come too far. This might not be the type of track to where their engine combination shows up at its very best. I think it’s better whenever the RPMs get down a little bit lower, but I still think that they’ve just made such a huge gain with everything they’ve done. I think it’s the rest of the field, the Chevrolets and the Fords, trying to catch the Toyotas this weekend.

Kyle Petty: The field. I know Kyle can win. Chase has been close, and we all believe he can win. But Kyle Busch and Martin Truex Jr. have shown in the last four weeks at different tracks that they can dominate! If they’re in the field, I’ll take them every time! 

Nate Ryan: The field. Even though Toyota has only one win in the past 11 races at Michigan, it feels as if Larson and Elliott are underdogs to the speed of Joe Gibbs Racing and Furniture Row Racing. Unless it comes down to fuel mileage or off-sequence strategies, it’s tough to envision a Chevy winning at Michigan.

Dustin Long: I’ll take Larson and Elliott. Yes, Toyotas have dominated lately but Michigan hasn’t been a track that has been great to them. Plus, Toyota’s run hasn’t to end sometime. Doesn’t it?

Where do you place the Kyle Busch-Brad Keselowski rivalry in the sport’s history?

Dale Jarrett: It’s turned into a nice little rivalry. It’s got a ways to go to get back to things that happened in the older days and a few others in the modern times. It’s certainly in there in the top 10. It’s entertaining to watch and listen to. I think if it happened on a little more regular basis, and that’s hard to come. Rivalries generally come when the two drivers are really competing for wins on a regular basis. The other day they weren’t even competing for the win at that time. I think it’s only going to continue to get better for us. At this point in time, it will be just inside the top 10 with the possibility with the two of them continuing that we could see this be full fledge and a lot of fun to cover.

Kyle Petty: The BK/KB rivalry in still in its early stages. I’ll have to wait and see how it grows. Right now for me it’s just a footnote on a few seasons.

Nate Ryan: It’s among the more fascinating in recent memory because of their endless parallels (ages, fatherhood and truck team ownership), but it remains a few notches below Petty-Pearson or Allison-Waltrip. All the elements seem to be there, though, for future conflicts (though it would help if Keselowski’s cars were faster).

Dustin Long: It’s got a ways to go to match Petty-Pearson but for this era — where competition is more balance, making it difficult for the same two drivers to race for the win week after week — this is one of the better ones. I’d say it’s probably the best rivalry since 2000.

Dale Jarrett and Kyle Petty join Krista Voda from the NASCAR Hall of Fame for today’s NASCAR America at 5 p.m. ET. Joey Logano is today’s guest.