Former NASCAR driver Robby Gordon banned from racing in Australia

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Former NASCAR, IndyCar and off-road star Robby Gordon has been banned from racing in Australia after a weekend on-street incident in the town of Darwin.

According to Sydney’s Daily Telegraph, Gordon performed a couple of burnouts on the main thoroughfare (Mitchell Street) in Darwin.

When Australian racing authorities found out about the incident, of which a video is contained in the Daily Telegraph’s online story, they banned Gordon from racing in the country.

Gordon owns and operates the Stadium Super Trucks Series, which has become very popular in Australia. It’s unclear if Gordon’s situation will impact the series from returning to the country for scheduled future competitions.

“We had a truck on display, I asked the two security guards, ‘Hey, you think I could flip a couple of doughies (donuts)?’ They said, ‘I don’t care’,” Gordon said, according to the Daily Telegraph.

Local judge Richard Coats did care, telling Gordon, “It’s one of the busiest streets in Darwin, I don’t believe the professional driving skills are an excuse. I wish I could take away your professional license, but unfortunately I don’t have the power to do that.”

Gordon was cited by local police for several driving offenses, including driving in a dangerous manner. He was fined $4,000 after appearing in Darwin Local Court on Monday.

Coats said he “would have considered sentencing Gordon to jail time for the stunt if he had been in trouble before.”

Less than 24 hours after the on-street display, Gordon finished second in a SST race at Darwin’s Hidden Valley Raceway, which was part of the weekend’s V8 Supercars race there.

Citing the incident and charges against Gordon, the Confederation of Australian Motorsport (CAMS) – which oversees racing competition in the country – said it indefinitely will keep Gordon from obtaining a competition visa on health and safety reasons.

“With CAMS actively engaging more than ever with local communities, government, and corporate Australia to grow and promote our sport, so-called ‘hoon’ behavior on public roads is not reflective of our values, nor our member base, and will not be tolerated,” chief executive Eugene Arocca said in a statement.

Arocca added, “It is unfortunate that such actions have taken place after an otherwise professional and well organized event at Hidden Valley Raceway, and such behavior is not reflective of the organizing committee of that event or Supercars.

“We are disappointed that this incident is not demonstrative of the requisite level of professionalism demanded by modern motorsport.”

Gordon downplayed the incident after his court appearance, telling local media in Darwin, “I think I did two doughnuts … not to make excuses, but maybe less than 5 kilometers an hour (just over 3 mph).

“Obviously the wheels were faster than that, but I did two doughnuts and put it back on the trailer.”

It’s unclear if Gordon legally will challenge his banishment.

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