2018 NASCAR Hall of Fame class: Yates, Byron, Evernham, Squier and Hornaday Jr.

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The 2018 NASCAR Hall of Fame induction class was announced Wednesday night at the Hall of Fame in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The class includes Robert Yates, Red Byron, Ray Evernham, Ken Squier and Ron Hornaday Jr.

This year was the second time there was a tie for the fifth induction spot. The tie was between Hornaday and 1992 Cup Series champion Alan Kulwicki. A tie breaker vote went to Hornaday.

Here’s your look at the ninth induction class for the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

(Photo by Rusty Jarrett/Getty Images for NASCAR)

Robert Yates – Percent of vote: 94

Hometown: Charlotte, North Carolina
Premier Series Owner Stats
Competed: 1989-2007
Starts: 1,155
Wins: 57
Poles: 48

Won NASCAR premier series championship as both an engine builder and owner. Began Robert Yates Racing in the late 1980s. Won the Daytona 500 three times with Davey Allison (1992) and Dale Jarrett (1996, 2000). Yates and Jarrett won the 1999 Cup series championship.

 

Red Byron (Born: 3/12/15 – Died: 11/11/60) – Percent of vote: 74

Hometown: Anniston, Alabama
Premier Series Stats
Competed: 1949-1951
Starts:  15
Wins: 2
Poles: 2

Byron won NASCAR’s first race in 1948 on the Daytona beach road course. He won NASCAR’s first season championship in the NASCAR Modified Division. The following year, he won NASCAR’s first Strictly Stock title – the precursor to today’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series – driving for car owner Raymond Parks. The Strictly Stock schedule had eight races; Byron won two of them. Wounded in World War II, the injury contributed to Byron’s brief career.

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Ray Evernham – Percent of vote: 52

Hometown: Hazlet, New Jersey
Premier Series Crew Chief Stats
Competed: 1992-1999
Starts: 213
Wins: 47
Poles: 30

With Jeff Gordon as his driver, the No. 24 team for Hendrick Motorsports won three championships (1995, ’97, ’98), and 47 wins in the 1990s, including two Daytona 500s (1997, ’99) and two Brickyard 400s (1994, ’98). In 2001, Evernham tried his hand at ownership, leading the return of Dodge to NASCAR. His team won 13 times, including NASCAR Hall of Famer Bill Elliott’s win in the 2002 Brickyard 400.

(Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images for NASCAR)

Ken Squier – Percent of vote: 52

Hometown: Waterbury, Vermont.

One of NASCAR’s original broadcasters, Squier co-founded the Motor Racing Network (MRN) in 1970. He is perhaps best-known for calling the 1979 Daytona 500, a milestone moment for the entire sport, as Squier’s voice on CBS welcomed millions to the first live flag-to-flag coverage of “The Great American Race” – a moniker he coined. Squier called races for CBS and TBS until 1997.

 

 

(Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Ron Hornaday Jr. – Percent of vote: 38

Hometown: Palmdale, California
Truck Series Driver Stats
Competed: 1995-99, 2002, 2004-14
Starts: 360
Wins: 51
Poles: 27

One of the forefathers of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series, few drivers can be mentioned in the same breath as Hornaday when it comes to wheeling a truck around a race track. The second-generation racer boasts a record four Truck Series championships and 51 wins. Hornaday also holds the Truck Series all-time marks for top fives (158) and top 10s (234). In 2009, Hornaday won five straight Truck Series races, a feat matched only three other times in NASCAR national series history.

The 2018 Landmark Award winner:

(Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

Jim France – Vice chairman/executive vice president of NASCAR and is also chairman of the board at the International Speedway Corporation (ISC). A steady influence behind the scenes for decades, he helped build the sport with his father Bill France Sr., the founder and first president of NASCAR, and brother Bill France Jr., NASCAR’s former president, chairman and CEO. Joining ISC in 1959, Jim France worked in all phases of operations in his early years with the company. He was elected to the ISC board in 1970 and has served as the company’s secretary, assistant treasurer, vice president, chief operating officer, executive vice president and president.