Ryan: Las Vegas ‘fight’ deserves no penalty . . . And what’s the latest on a new manufacturer?

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Las Vegas has produced more memorable “fights” than this one, but Sunday’s Kyle BuschJoey Logano postrace contretemps promises to fuel all NASCAR conversation and debate in the short term.

Will the latest “controversy” over a brawl in the pits have more than a half-life of a few days, and is there anything truly trenchant left to say about it?

From this corner, the bets are on the answers being “no” and “no.”

The only way this story truly gets legs is if NASCAR chooses stern punishment for Busch or any team members, which would be profoundly silly for several reasons (executive vice president Steve O’Donnell hinted Monday that NASCAR likely won’t issue severe penalties).

Sunday’s kinetic scene was a reminder of the raw drama upon which stock-car racing was built.

The 1979 Daytona 500, the most famous race in NASCAR history, ended with a fracas very similar to Sunday (though we don’t have the benefit of knowing the literal blow by blow thanks to an intrepid reporter with a smartphone).

There were $6,000 fines handed out to the Allison brothers and Cale Yarborough, but the joke always has been that the trio should have been earning residuals from NASCAR ever since an episode that became among the most indelible in racing history.

Perhaps there will be some wrist slaps for Busch and a few of Logano’s team members, but it should end there.

Unlike the Jeff GordonBrad Keselowski brouhaha that resulted in four suspensions, this wasn’t an unruly melee that put others at risk in the pits. It mostly was triggered by Busch acting alone rather than a mob’s roiling angst.

Yes, Jimmy Spencer once was suspended for sucker-punching Kurt Busch after an Aug. 17, 2003 race at Michigan International Speedway.

But that wasn’t captured on video (if it had, the reaction might have been much different), and it happened during the heavily image-conscious era several years before NASCAR christened the “Boys, Have At It” policy that effectively permits frontier justice as Busch attempted to administer.

While NASCAR must be careful about tacitly celebrating such displays of violence, attempting to legislate postrace emotion would be foolhardy and run counter to everything preached about why stock-car racing stands alone as a sport that showcases passion.

The only area that perhaps needs to be addressed by NASCAR is the scene that left Busch with a bloody forehead. The Joe Gibbs Racing driver put himself in that position to great degree, but the postrace brawls might need better ground rules that put some limitations on how many burly and physically sculpted pit crew members enter the fray.

A few other leftovers from Las Vegas:

–An announcement last Friday by Las Vegas Motor Speedway underscored what a sweetheart deal Speedway Motorsports Inc. received by moving its annual fall race at New Hampshire Motor Speedway to Sin City.

As part of the deal, the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority agreed to spend $2.5 million annually — $1 million to the track for each race as the title sponsor and another $500,000 on marketing and promotion – for a guaranteed $17 million over seven years.

But the contract also permits the track to sell title sponsorships for each of its races, which is why the Pennzoil 400 was announced as the new name for the March 2018 race.

Las Vegas still will fork over $1 million for the March 2018 race because the city’s name remains “prominently displayed” in the event’s logo.

How “prominently?” Well, you can look here and decide for yourself.

The market value of Cup race title sponsorships can vary greatly depending on the track and race, but it’s safe to say Pennzoil is paying well into the six figures – and possibly much more – to brand the race. Though the company had an existing relationship with SMI, a track spokesman confirmed the race sponsorship was a new deal with the track.

It’s another lucrative layer to why realigning the New Hampshire race makes fiscal sense for SMI.

The rumblings about a new manufacturer entering Cup haven’t quieted since Dodge’s multiple meetings in the offseason with NASCAR. This past weekend, there was garage buzz that 1) Dodge might be moving down the road with a team; and 2) there could be another manufacturer interested.

Is the debut of a new automaker in Cup imminent?

It would seem unlikely given the lead time required and the approvals needed by NASCAR. As a guest on this week’s NASCAR on NBC podcast (Wednesday’s episode will focus on the 2018 Camry), Toyota Racing Development president David Wilson said the NASCAR OEM council, which meets quarterly, regularly discusses the sport’s next manufacturer.

But Wilson, who would “love another manufacturer to join the sport,” said it would likely be 2019 at the earliest that it could be possible.

“There are requirements and things to do to get your car approved that suggest it’s not on the doorstep,” Wilson said at Daytona for the upcoming episode of the podcast. “I don’t think we’ll be seeing any 2018 announcements.”

Kevin Harvick didn’t mince words in evaluating one of his first experiences with NASCAR’s new traveling safety team.

Based off the Fox broadcast, it took at least 90 seconds for safety workers to reach Harvick after his No. 4 Ford blew a tire and slammed the wall in a heavy impact. It’s understandable why Harvick’s ire would have been stoked by that response time, though it’s unclear if the new policy would have had an impact.

NASCAR’s new American Medical Response-sponsored crew features a rotating crew of emergency trauma physicians who are in a chase vehicle to attend to each crash. Each track’s safety staff still handles the primary response to an incident.

Regardless, NASCAR surely will be reviewing the Harvick crash to improve on best practices and procedures for helping a driver in need.

Saturday Cup race at Bristol: Start time, TV channel

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Four drivers will be eliminated from the Cup playoffs after Saturday night’s race at Bristol Motor Speedway.

This marks the first time the track has been in the playoffs. The Saturday Cup race at Bristol will end the first round. The 16-driver field will be cut to 12.

William Byron (3 points behind the cutline), Cole Custer (-8), Matt DiBenedetto (-25) and Ryan Blaney (-27) are the four drivers out of a playoff spot. Clint Bowyer holds the final transfer spot.

Here is all the info for the Saturday Cup race at Bristol:

(All times are Eastern)

START: The command to start engines is at 7:38 p.m. The green flag waves at 7:45 p.m.

PRERACE: Cup haulers enter the garage (screening and equipment unload) at 10:30 a.m. Garage access health screening begins at 12:30 p.m. Garage opens at 12:30 p.m. Drivers report to their cars at 7:10 p.m. Driver introductions will be at 7:15 p.m. The invocation is at 7:30 p.m. The national anthem will be performed by Joe Nichols, three-time Grammy nominee, at 7:31 p.m.

DISTANCE: The race is 500 laps (266.5 miles) around the .533-mile track.

STAGES: Stage 1 ends on Lap 125. Stage 2 ends on Lap 250

TV/RADIO: NBCSN will televise the race. Coverage begins at 6:30 p.m with NASCAR America, followed by Countdown to Green at 7 p.m. Race coverage begins at 7:30 p.m. Performance Racing Network’s radio coverage will begin at 6:30 p.m. and also can be heard at goprn.com. SiriusXM NASCAR Radio will carry the broadcast.

STREAMING: Watch the race on the NBC Sports App

FORECAST: The wunderground.com forecast calls for partly cloudy skies with a high of 62 degrees and a 3% chance of rain at the start of the race.

LAST RACE: Brad Keselowski won at Richmond. Martin Truex Jr. finished second. Joey Logano placed third for the second race in a row.

LAST POINTS RACE AT BRISTOL: Brad Keselowski won in May after Denny Hamlin lost the lead when he hit the wall. Chase Elliott ran into Joey Logano as they battled for the lead late in the event.

STARTING LINEUP: Click here for Cup starting lineup

CATCH UP ON NBC SPORTS’ COVERAGE:

Bubble drivers brace for Bristol battle

Pit crew change for teams of Alex Bowman and Jimmie Johnson

Friday 5: The thin line between aggressive and dirty driving

Matt DiBenedetto, Ryan Blaney seek NASCAR history to advance

What upcoming Cup playoff races NASCAR fans can attend

Trevor Bayne says the fire remains to run more races

Cup playoff clinching scenarios to make Round of 12

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The first elimination race of the Cup playoffs has arrived in the form of Bristol Motor Speedway.

Tonight’s 500-lap race on the short track will determine which drivers make up the Round of 12.

Three drivers have locked themselves into the second round. Kevin Harvick and Brad Keselowski earned their spots via race wins at Darlington and Richmond. Denny Hamlin clinched a spot via points.

More: Brad Keselowski on pole for Bristol

That leaves nine spots for 13 drivers to compete for.

If there is a new winner, the following drivers could clinch by being ahead of the 10th winless driver in the standings.

Joey Logano – would clinch with 7 points: 51 points ahead of the Round of 12 cutoff. Logano has finished third in the last two playoff races (at Darlington and Richmond). Has made 23 starts at Bristol posting one pole, two wins, six top fives and 10 top 10s. Logano’s average finish is 15.3.

Martin Truex Jr. – would clinch with 20 points: 38 points ahead of the Round of 12 cutoff. Earned 22nd-place finish at Darlington and second-place finish at Richmond. Has made 29 series starts at Bristol posting two top fives and three top 10s. His average finish is 20.6.

Austin Dillon – would clinch with 21 points: 36 points ahead of the Round of 12 cutoff. Dillion has a runner-up finish at Darlington and a fourth-place result last weekend at Richmond. Has 13 starts at Bristol posting one top five and three top 10s. His average finish is 17.3.

Chase Elliott – Would clinch with 30 points: 28 points ahead of the Round of 12 cutoff. Elliott finished 20th at Darlington and fifth at Richmond. Has made nine starts at Bristol and has one pole, three top fives and four top 10s. Average finish is 12.6.

Alex Bowman – would clinch with 31 points: 27 points ahead of the Round of 12 cutoff. Bowman placed sixth at Darlington and ninth at Richmond. Has made nine series starts at Bristol with one top five and two top 10s. His average finish is 22.6.

Kyle Busch – would clinch with 40 points: Just 18 points ahead of the Round of 12 cutoff. Has seventh-place finish at Darlington and a sixth-place finish at Richmond. Has made 30 Cup starts at Bristol posting two poles and a series-leading eight wins among active drivers.

Aric Almirola – would clinch with 51 points: Seven points ahead of the Round of 12 cutoff. Finished ninth at Darlington and eighth at Richmond. Has made 22 starts at Bristol with one top five and two top 10s. His average finish is 25.0.

Kurt Busch – would clinch with 51 points: Seven points ahead of the cutoff sport. Almirola holds the tiebreaker of best finish in the current playoff round. Busch has finished eighth at Darlington and 13th at Richmond. Has 39 Cup starts at Bristol with one pole, six wins, 12 top fives and 21 top 10s. Average finish is 14th.

Clint Bowyer – would clinch with 55 points: Three points over cutoff. Finished 10th at Darlington and Richmond. Bowyer has made 29 Cup starts at Bristol with eight top fives and 16 top 10s. Average finish is 13.6.

William Byron (-3 points from cutoff; would need help to clinch): Finished fifth at Darlington and 21st at Richmond. Five Cup starts at Bristol with one top 10. Average finish of 17.2.

Cole Custer (-8 points; would need help to clinch): Finished 12th at Darlington and 14th at Richmond. Finished 25th in lone Bristol Cup start.

Matt DiBenedetto (-25 points; would need help to clinch): Finished 21st at Darlington and 17th at Richmond. Eleven Cup starts at Bristol with one top five and one top 10. Average finish of 19.1.

Ryan Blaney
Ryan Blaney is last on the 16 driver playoff grid heading into Bristol. (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)

Ryan Blaney (-27 points; would need help to clinch): Finished 24th at Darlington and 19th at Richmond. Ten Cup starts at Bristol with one top five and three other top 10s. Average finish of 20.7.

More: Blaney and DiBenedetto seek history to advance to second round

Should there be a repeat winner Saturday – Harvick or Keselowski – the following drivers would advance to the next round by being ahead of the 11th winless driver in the standings.

Joey Logano: Would clinch with 4 points

Martin Truex Jr.: Would clinch with 17 points

Austin Dillon: Would clinch with 18 points

Chase Elliott: Would clinch with 27 points

Alex Bowman: Would clinch with 28 points

Kyle Busch: Would clinch with 37 points

Aric Almirola: Would clinch with 48 points

Kurt Busch: Would clinch with 48 points

Clint Bowyer: Would clinch with 52 points

William Byron: Would clinch with 55 points

Cole Custer, Matt DiBenedetto and Ryan Blaney: Could only clinch with help

Xfinity race results, point standings after Bristol

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Chase Briscoe led the final six laps and won Friday night’s Xfinity Series race at Bristol for his seventh win of the season.

Briscoe beat Ross Chastain for the win. The top five was completed by Austin Cindric, Harrison Burton and Justin Allgaier.

Click here for the race results.

Playoff standings

The 12-driver field for the playoffs has been set with Briscoe’s win in the regular-season finale.

Brandon Brown placed 12th and clinched the 12th and final spot.

Here are the re-seeded point standings entering the playoffs.

Chase Briscoe – 2,050 points

Austin Cindric – 2,050

Justin Allgaier – 2,033

Noah Gragson – 2,025

Brandon Jones – 2,020

Justin Haley – 2,018

Harrison Burton – 2,014

Ross Chastain – 2,010

Ryan Sieg – 2,002

Michael Annett – 2,002

Riley Herbst – 2,001

Brandon Brown – 2,000

Click here for the re-seeded standings.

Click here for the normal point standings.

Chase Briscoe wins Xfinity race at Bristol Motor Speedway

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Chase Briscoe took the lead with six laps to go and won Friday night’s Xfinity Series race at Bristol Motor Speedway, which marked the end of the regular season.

Briscoe passed Austin Cindric to assume the lead and went unchallenged to the checkered flag. The victory is his series-leading seventh of the season.

“I was so mad after last week (at Richmond),” Briscoe told NBCSN. “I told all the guys there ain’t no way we’re getting beat today. I was so mad after how we ran last week and I get on the internet all the time and see guys count us out after one bad race and I know what this team is capable. … I finished second here the last two races and I wanted to win here so bad and it’s awesome that I can actually celebrate it with all these race fans.”

The top five was completed by Ross Chastain, Cindric, Harrison Burton and Justin Allgaier.

More: Race results, playoff standings

Allgaier dominated the early portion of the race, leading 126 laps and winning the first two stages. But he lost the lead for good in the pits during the Stage 2 break.

Brandon Brown finished 12th and clinched the 12th and final playoff spot.

STAGE 1 WINNER: Justin Allgaier

STAGE 2 WINNER: Justin Allgaier

WHO HAD A GOOD RACE: Ross Chastain led three times for 117 laps, but had to settle for his fifth runner-up finish of the season without a win … Austin Cindric earned his 13th top-10 finish in the last 14 races … Harrison Burton earned his 13th top five of the season.

WHO HAD A BAD RACE: Brett Moffitt finished 27th after he had to pit three times in the opening laps and was penalized for taking fuel before the competition caution … BJ McLeod finished 34th after he was eliminated in a multi-car wreck that began when he made contact with teammate Jeffrey EarnhardtMichael Annett finished 31st and Joe Graf Jr. placed 27th after they were involved in an incident on Lap 120.

QUOTE OF THE RACE: “I hit pit road and I wanted to cry.” – Ross Chastain after he finished second for the fifth time this year. He is winless entering the playoffs.

WHAT’S NEXT: The Xfinity playoffs open at Las Vegas Motor Speedway at 7:30 p.m. ET on Sept. 26 on NBCSN.