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Team Penske buys charter from Roush Fenway Racing for third Cup car

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Roush Fenway Racing has sold one of its charters to Team Penske, who will use it to field the No. 12 Ford driven by Ryan Blaney in 2018, NBC Sports has confirmed.

Sports Business Journal first reported the transaction.

The charter Roush sold had initially been used on the No. 16 Ford driven by Greg Biffle in 2016. The team scaled back to a two-car operation in 2017 with the No. 6 driven by Trevor Bayne and Ricky Stenhouse Jr.‘s No. 17.

The No. 16 charter was leased to JTG Daugherty Racing in 2017 for use on Chris Buescher‘s No. 37 Chevrolet.

There are 36 charters in the Cup Series that guarantee starting spots.

Penske will return to operating three full-time Cup cars in the Cup Series for the first time since 2010. That year Penkse fielded rides for Brad Keselowski, Sam Hornish Jr. and Kurt Busch.

Blaney’s No. 12 Ford will join Keselowski’s No. 2 and Joey Logano‘s No. 22.

Blaney joins Team Penske after driving the No. 21 Ford for Wood Brothers Racing full-time the last two seasons. He has driven for Team Penske in the Xfinity Series since 2012.

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With Matt Kenseth retirement, Jamie McMurray knows his time in NASCAR is limited

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Jamie McMurray knows his time is coming.

At some point in the not too distant future, the book will close on his NASCAR career.

It took the somewhat-forced retirement of Matt Kenseth, who McMurray raced against beginning in Late Models in 1994, for him to come to terms with that.

Kenseth’s career ended after 18 full-time seasons in the Cup Series, the first coming in 2000. His last start, in the 2017 finale, came at the age of 45 and with him as the oldest full-time driver on the circuit.

Paired with the retirement of Dale Earnhardt Jr., it was the latest in long line of departures from the sport in the last three years, including Jeff Gordon, Tony Stewart, Greg Biffle, Danica Patrick and the surprise retirement of Carl Edwards last January.

“With Matt this year, it probably hit home the most, just because I’m such good friends with Matt,” McMurray said last month during Champion’s Week in Las Vegas. “I know how much he loved racing. It was awesome he was able to win at Phoenix this year in his last year. It’s kind of sad, honestly. I came in not long after those guys, so your days are somewhat numbered.”

The driver of Chip Ganassi Racing’s No. 1 Chevrolet has a rough target date he has in mind for exiting the spotlight he stepped into in 2002. That year he won his second Cup start while driving for an injured Sterling Marlin.

“My goal is to be able to race for maybe four more years, maybe a little bit more,” McMurray said.

If McMurray get his wish, that would have him exiting the Cup Series by at least the end of 2021, 19 years after his first start. Having turned 41 last June, he would be 45 at the end of that season.

Of the recently retired, Biffle came into the Cup Series full-time in 2003 with McMurray. Edwards made 13 starts in 2004 before his full rookie season in 2005. Like Kenseth, Earnhardt’s rookie year came in 2000.

McMurray, who has seven Cup wins, is one of five drivers remaining in Cup who competed full-time in 2003.

Joining him are Ryan Newman, Kurt Busch, Kevin Harvick and Jimmie Johnson.

Newman and Johnson enter their 17th full-time Cup seasons.

Busch and Harvick enter their 18th full-time seasons.

Elliott Sadler also raced full-time in 2003. He will again be driving for JR Motorsports in the Xfinity Series.

Four years may seem a long way off, but it’ll be here before you know it. How does McMurray anticipate dealing with having to make the decision on when to walk away? He’ll be taking notes from the recently retired.

“I will watch them for the next few years,” McMurray said. “I watched Biffle this year with it being his first year out of the sport. You watch that transition, because there’s some unknowns there of, we are so busy. Everybody in our industry is so busy every single weekend. You hear everyone talk about how hard it is to step away because of how much time you all of a sudden have. You have time for things you didn’t used to. It’s sad in a way.”

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With Las Vegas parties over, NASCAR turns the page to 2018

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The party is over, well it likely ended not long ago in Las Vegas, and the 2017 NASCAR season is over.

While the sport celebrated Martin Truex Jr.’s Cup title Thursday, it also reflected upon those who will be moving on to other things.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. is retired from racing in the Cup Series, although he is expected to make two Xfinity Series race starts in 2018 for JR Motorsports. Matt Kenseth doesn’t have a ride for next year. Danica Patrick will drive the Daytona 500 before focusing on racing in the Indianapolis 500 and ending her driving career.

MORE: NASCAR celebrates its new champion 

MORE: Who wore it best on the red carpet?

They follow in the recent departures of Carl Edwards, Tony Stewart, Jeff Gordon and Greg Biffle. With the exit of Stewart and Gordon, Jimmie Johnson is the sport’s only active multi-time Cup champion.

Only five drivers who finished in the top 15 in points in 2005 will be back to compete in 2018 — Johnson, Ryan Newman, Kurt Busch, Jamie McMurray and Kevin Harvick.

Each is closing in on when they’ll leave the sport. Johnson is 42. Harvick turns 42 on Dec. 8. McMurray is 41. Newman turns 40 on Dec. 8. Busch is 39.

“It’s kind of sad, honestly,’’ McMurray said this week in Las Vegas of the sport’s transition. “I came in not long after those guys, so you know that your days are somewhat numbered.

“My goal is to be able to race for maybe four more years, maybe a little bit more. I watched Biffle this year with (this) being his first year out of the sport. I’ve watched the transitions because there are some unknowns there. We are so busy, everybody in our industry is so busy every single weekend.

“You hear everyone talk about how hard it is step away because of how much time you all of a sudden have, and you have time for things that you didn’t used to.’’

That’s what Kenseth will face, but he will be busier with his wife due this month to deliver the couple’s fourth child.

“I think it will take a few days, few weeks to get home and get wound down and get in the swing of things,’’ Kenseth said after Thursday night’s NASCAR Cup Awards in Las Vegas. “Got a lot going on at home right now. Looking forward to this month. Looking forward to the holidays this year. Kind of turn the calendar over to another year and get settled in. Everything is going really great. Got a lot to look forward to. Got a lot to be thankful for.’’

As drivers leave, others enter. Cup drivers age 25 and under with rides for next season include William Byron (20), Erik Jones (21), Chase Elliott (22), Ryan Blaney (turns 24 on Dec. 31), Alex Bowman (24), Darrell Wallace Jr. (24), Chris Buescher (25), Ty Dillon (25), Kyle Larson (25) and Daniel Suarez (25).

“It’s true, we’re in a transition,’’ NASCAR Chairman Brian France said at Homestead-Miami Speedway. “But that happens from time to time. Not usually in the concentrated manner that we have now, but it happens. But we’re excited.’’

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NASCAR America: Erik Jones’ racing roots in Byron, Michigan

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After a feature looking at his upbringing in Byron, Michigan, Furniture Row Racing driver Erik Jones spoke with NASCAR America’s Steve Letarte, Dale Jarrett and Marty Snider about the early years of his racing career.

The journey to his NASCAR career began with a yard cart that his late father, Dave Jones, brought home one day when he was 3.

“I rode that all day long around the yard,” Jones said. “Winter time would and we had like a gravel circle driveway in front of our house. When it would snow over I would get the kart out and ride it around in the snow because I could slide and I thought that was pretty cool. I would get it stuck about every five minutes out in the snow.”

Jones would then get out of the kart and find his dad in their barn to come out get him out.

Now 21, Jones also discussed how much his dad was involved in his career until his death in June 2016 after a battle with cancer.

He also explains how he’s never stayed in any series for more than one year in his career.

Watch the video above for the full discussion.

NASCAR America: Jeff Burton, Greg Biffle draft their dream four-car teams

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Of all the major national sports leagues, NASCAR is the only one that doesn’t have some sort of draft to fills its ranks of drivers at its top level.

With the drafts for the NBA and NHL coming up this weekend, NASCAR America decided to have its own mock draft.

Analysts Jeff Burton and Greg Biffle each selected drivers for their own dream four-car team.

Here’s who each analyst picked:

Jeff Burton

  1. Jimmie Johnson
  2. Kevin Harvick
  3. Brad Keselowski
  4. Joey Logano

Greg Biffle

  1. Kyle Larson
  2. Martin Truex Jr.
  3. Kyle Busch
  4. Ryan Blaney

Which four drivers would you pick?

Watch the above video to hear why they picked each driver.