Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images

Today’s Xfinity race at Auto Club Speedway: Start time, weather, TV/radio info

Leave a comment

After four races, Xfinity Series regulars have won twice (Ryan Reed at Daytona and Justin Allgaier at Phoenix) and Cup drivers have won twice (Kyle Busch at Atlanta and Joey Logano at Las Vegas). The Xfinity Series regulars will look to take the lead in that category at Auto Club Speedway.

Here are the particulars for today’s race:

(All times are Eastern)

START: Stu Crum, COO of Service King, will give the command for drivers to start engines at 4:07 p.m. ET. The green flag is scheduled for 4:16 p.m.

DISTANCE: The race is scheduled for 150 laps (300 miles) around the 2-mile oval.

PRERACE SCHEDULE: The Xfinity garage opens at 10 a.m. The drivers meeting is at 2:15 p.m. Driver introductions are at 3:35 p.m.

NATIONAL ANTHEM: Karen Waldrup will perform the Anthem at 4:01 p.m.

TV/RADIO: Fox Sports 1 will broadcast the race at 4 p.m. Its coverage begins at 3:30 p.m. Motor Racing Network will broadcast the race on radio and at mrn.com. MRN’s coverage begins at 3:30 p.m. SiriusXM NASCAR Radio will carry MRN’s broadcast.

FORECAST: The wunderground.com site predicts 63 degrees at race time with a 7 percent chance of rain at the start of the race.

LAST YEAR: Austin Dillon took the lead on a wild final lap and went on to win. Kyle Busch led and cut a tire. Daniel Suarez took the lead but ran out of fuel. Busch managed to retake the lead. Dillon got by Busch for the lead in Turn 4 after hitting the wall. Busch finished second and Darrell Wallace Jr. was third.

STARTING LINEUP: Qualifying at 12:30 p.m.

Starting grid for the NASCAR Cup Series’ Auto Club 400

Photo by Sarah Crabill/Getty Images
1 Comment

With the second pole of his NASCAR Cup Series career, Kyle Larson will lead the field to green Sunday in the Auto Club 400 at Auto Club Speedway.

Joining Larson the front row is Denny Hamlin.

Filling out the top five is Brad Keselowski, Martin Treux Jr. and Ryan Newman.

Click here for the starting grid.

Austin Dillon: NASCAR will issue ‘very harsh’ penalties for repeat offense

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Following his meeting with Cole Custer and NASCAR officials Friday at Auto Club Speedway, Dillon told ESPN any further stepping out of line by him would lead to “very harsh” penalties.

“NASCAR did a really good job of sharing with me that if I make a mistake like that again that the penalties would be very harsh,” Dillon said. “I love to race, and I don’t want to be on the sideline, ever.”

NASCAR told NBC Sports it does not comment on what drivers are told in hauler meetings.

Neither Dillon nor Custer were penalized for their episode last weekend at Phoenix Raceway that saw Dillon intentionally squeeze Custer into the wall at slow speed under caution in the Xfinity Series race.

Dillon retaliated against Custer after the rookie Stewart-Haas Racing driver got loose in Turn 1 on Lap 190 and ran up into Dillon, sending him into the outside wall and causing significant damage to his No. 2 car for Richard Childress Racing. After slowly leaving the scene of the accident, Dillon drove up the track as Custer came around him.

NASCAR parked Dillon for the final nine laps of the race and spoke to him and his crew chief following the event.

During a Friday press conference, Custer said his meeting with NASCAR and Dillon “went really good.

“We both have things that we wish we would have done different in the moment, but it is what it is and we’ll just try to move on from it.”

Custer had apologized on Twitter after the race and said Friday he did not feel any anxiety about the meeting with Dillon.

“I think we both felt like we got along pretty well and we weren’t on bad terms that much, so we talked a little bit about it and just said how we messed up,” Custer said. “If it’s a pretty bad situation, sometimes you’ll just sit there and say nothing, but it just depends.”

Custer said the meeting ended with the drivers shaking hands.

NASCAR has not issued any punishments the last two weeks after driver altercations. There were no penalties after Kyle Busch threw a punch at Joey Logano after the Cup race at Las Vegas Motor Speedway.

 and on Facebook

Sandy Wexler, AKA Adam Sandler, crashes Cup Series garage to promote new movie

Leave a comment

A couple weeks ago at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, the NASCAR Cup Series garage had a noteworthy visitor.

Sandy Wexler, a low-level talent manager from Los Angeles, swooped through the garage trying to sign his next big client.

Wexler said he was asked by NASCAR to stop by the track to talk to drivers and “make them better racers and make them better people.”

His targets included Dale Earnhardt Jr., Denny Hamlin, Austin Dillon, Joey Logano, Kurt Busch, Kyle Larson and Ricky Stenhouse Jr.

In reality, it was just actor Adam Sandler in character to promote his next movie, Sandy Wexler, which premieres April 14 on Netflix.

This isn’t the first time Sandler has been seen at a NASCAR track. Sandler has given the command to start engines at three different Cup races.

Watch the video below to see if Wexler lands some NASCAR talent.

 and on Facebook

Dale Earnhardt Jr. offers frank assessment on recent issues, NASCAR’s reaction and potential impact

13 Comments

Dale Earnhardt Jr. questions what type of message NASCAR could be sending if it doesn’t further penalize Austin Dillon a week after not punishing Kyle Busch for swinging at Joey Logano.

Earnhardt made his comments Tuesday on his podcast, the Dale Jr. Download.

Earnhardt spent about 10 minutes on the topic, which branched out to how he would punish Dillon and NASCAR’s fluid enforcement of such issues through the years.

NASCAR parked Dillon after he pinned Cole Custer’s car against the wall in last weekend’s Xfinity race at Phoenix Raceway. Dillon retaliated for contact by Custer that wrecked Dillon. Custer apologized on the radio afterward and on social media. NASCAR is expected to reveal Wednesday if there will be any other penalties with the incident.

“This isn’t nothing against Austin or Kyle for that matter,’’ Earnhardt said on his podcast. “The only thing that I worry about really isn’t what the fans think about the penalties or to penalize or not to penalize, (or) whether the sponsors have a problem with their car getting penalized or not penalized, what I worry about is what do you want to happen in the future? Like next week, six months from now, a year from now.

“How do you want the next guy, the next driver that is in this situation, that is in Austin’s position, how do you want that driver to react? Do you want him to think that it’s OK to smash into this car?’’

A point that Earnhardt made in his podcast is that Custer is competing for the Xfinity points title, while Dillon is not.

VIDEO: When will Dale Jr. break his winless streak?

“Austin is a Cup regular in a series that is a privilege for the Cup regulars to run in,’’ Earnhardt said. “They’re limiting the opportunity for the Cup regulars in that series. It’s a privilege to be in that series, and I have an opportunity to run in it, so running into one of the regulars, I know you’re mad, should have probably punched him. Just don’t run into him.

“If punching is OK, obviously going and punching or karate chopping or karate kicking or roundhouse kicking somebody on pit road is fair game, but smashing into their car on the race track in between the flags has never been good.’’

Earnhardt’s comment was in reference to Busch’s actions after the Las Vegas Cup race earlier this month. After contact from Logano caused Busch to spin and go from a likely top-five result to a 22nd-place finish, Busch walked up pit road to Logano and swung at the driver.

Earnhardt also worries that if series officials allow drivers to be more confrontational, how that might impact younger drivers racing elsewhere with dreams of competing in NASCAR.

“These kids that drive these (Late Model) cars are usually as young as 13 years old, right?’’ Earnhardt said on his podcast. “Incredibly impressionable. If they’re seeing this on TV on Saturday and Sunday, they’re going to take that into their mind thinking that is how you do it, that’s OK, that’s acceptable. We don’t want these kids growing up with that mindset that, yeah man, I’m going to smash into this guy because I felt he wronged me.’’

Read more on Dale Earnhardt Jr.

Earnhardt also said he would have a unique penalty for Dillon.

“You don’t have to go overboard on fines,’’ Earnhardt said. “Parking Austin wasn’t the thing to do. I would have probably fined him $5,000 and made him go do an appearance for an Xfinity race. Make him think about it during his out-of-market appearance promoting another Xfinity race, maybe next time he won’t do this. Plus, you get some free marketing out of it. You got a driver on the clock promoting the next race for free. It’s good for everybody.’’

If nothing else, Earnhardt said some sort of penalty would be good.

“Even if it is a slap on the wrist, at least it is sending a message that we really don’t want this to happen,’’ Earnhardt said. “I talked to NASCAR a little bit about this. Their position is that they don’t want a bunch of buddies out there racing around. They don’t want everybody all friendly and letting each other go and slapping each other on the back and all that stuff to the finish line. They want personalities. They want drama, but I think the drama belongs in between the flags.’’

But how NASCAR oversees the drivers has changed through the years, he admits.

“It seems like the sport goes through this ebb and flow of we’re going to let them have at it and let them do whatever they want, and then they flow into a couple of years of we’re going to penalize everything, we’re going to have a six-tier penalty system … and then it flows back to there’s too many penalties, we’re just going to let them do whatever they want to do.

“We keep cycling in and out of that, and we can’t really find some sort of happy, consistent medium. I don’t know. I’m disappointed when I see what happened with Kyle and Joey, and if Austin and all those guys, if some sort of repercussion isn’t delivered. It’s just disappointing.’’

Go here to listen Earnhardt’s podcast, which covers several other topics.

 and on Facebook