NASCAR on NBC podcast

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 72: Jeff Gluck on the Kyle Busch-Joey Logano video at Vegas

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Longtime NASCAR reporter Jeff Gluck joined the NASCAR on NBC podcast to discuss his viral video of the Kyle BuschJoey Logano confrontation and his foray into self-service journalism.

Gluck, who started his own website (www.jeffgluck.com, which has a revenue model based on reader donations) to cover racing in January, captured Busch’s march through the pits at Las Vegas Motor Speedway and subsequent swing at Logano after the Cup drivers were involved in a last-lap crash.

For several years, Gluck’s postrace routine has been to canvas the garage and pit area for incidents such as this, but he had no inkling that he would capture this moment.

He was headed toward the No. 2 Ford of Brad Keselowski (who lost the lead in the closing laps because of a mechanical failure) when he spotted Busch.

“I see this yellow blur out of the corner of my eye, not walking super fast, but walking faster in the same direction I was,” Gluck said on the podcast. “And I turned around and thought, “Kyle! Why is he going this way? The care center is not this way? Oh he’s mad at somebody.’

“But I didn’t know who or why. So, the bottom line is when you see Kyle Busch angrily walking down pit road, you take your phone out.”

Gluck lingered in the pits and talked to Logano and briefly contemplated waiting on Busch outside the care center before deciding to upload the video, pronto.

“There was a huge moment of hesitation,” he said. “I stood there for about 30 seconds and was a little shocked.

“Judging by the Twitter mentions, I realized it wasn’t on TV. I should probably post this right away.”

The video quickly garnered more than 1 million views on YouTube and spread around the world (emails seeking approval of use arrived from Denmark).

“Thor from Denmark,” Gluck said with a laugh. “(He) said, ‘Hi, your great video has made it all the way to Denmark. We have much interest in this! Can we play it on our local sports broadcast? He of all people doubled back to me a couple of times to make sure there were no rights issues.”

Other topics discussed:

–The aftermath of the video and the decisions he made on distribution.

–The progress of his eponymous site through its first two months.

–Why he thinks there was such an overwhelming reaction to his site (he attributes some of it to the 2016 election cycle).

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone. It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify and a host of other smartphone apps.

 

Steve Letarte on pro athlete socializing in pregame: ‘Nothing irritates me more’

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During the latest episode of his podcast, Dale Earnhardt Jr. said NASCAR “doesn’t want a bunch of buddies out there racing around.”

His former crew chief expressed the same sentiment on the latest NASCAR on NBC podcast.

“Nothing irritates me more than going to a football or basketball game early and seeing two superstars from separate teams speak to each other pre-event,” NASCAR on NBC analyst Steve Letarte said on the episode released Wednesday. “Post-event is different. But pre-event, nothing is more frustrating. I want to turn my ticket in and leave.

“I’m a sports fan. I hate the Yankees. I’m a Red Sox fan. The last thing I want to do is go to Fenway Park and see the starting pitcher from the Red Sox chum it up with the Yankees. Nah, man. Take my ticket back. I’m leaving.”

The podcast also prompted a Wednesday night discussion on NASCAR America (VIDEO ABOVE) with Kyle Petty and Parker Kligerman weighing in on the topic.

Letarte, who was the crew chief for Earnhardt’s No. 88 Chevrolet from 2011-14, suggested NASCAR needs to consider reconfiguring its driver introductions.

“When I see prerace, these drivers hanging out, there is a responsibility to be civil,” Letarte said. “We jam them in this pen. I wish all that changed. I wish they wouldn’t even give them the opportunity to hang out with one another.

“As a sport, we do a disservice to our drivers when we put them in this holding pen behind driver introductions. I think it should be there’s a reason there are locker rooms on two sides of the stadium. They personally don’t want your paths to cross before battle.

“I wish there was a creative way to do that for race car drivers. Because I don’t like to see them hanging out and being buddies. I want them to beat the crap out of each other on the racetrack. Our fans are that way. Why shouldn’t the competitors be that way?”

The dynamic of driver relationships has changed since two decades ago with the introduction of motorhomes that created a virtual infield neighborhood that put stars inches apart all the time.

But Letarte believes precedents have shown that rivalries can exist despite friendships.

Jeff Gordon and Dale Earnhardt Sr. had major businesses together,” Letarte said. “They had more respect for each other than anyone I’ve ever seen. Yet when that helmet strap went on, they hated each other. So it’s not too much. It’s been proven it can be done. So do it. I think you can live two lives and to be a professional sports star, you must.

“If you’re Kyle Larson who wants to play golf with Ricky Stenhouse Jr. and Danica Patrick and hang out because they all like sprint cars and have a lot in common, that’s fine. Until the day Kyle Larson doesn’t want to put the bumper to Ricky Stenhouse because he’s going to have to see him at the dirt track later.”

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone. It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify and a host of other smartphone apps.

 

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 71: Steve Letarte on the mystery of pit speeding penalties

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Why were so many NASCAR drivers penalized for speeding in the pits at Atlanta Motor Speedway and why will it happen again?

NASCAR on NBC analyst Steve Letarte provided an answer on the most recent episode of the NASCAR on NBC podcast.

In a breakdown of the 13 speeding penalties at Atlanta (around the 18:00 mark of the episode), Letarte explained that the debut of the digital dashboard last year and the shortening of speeding vectors in the pits have combined to make it more likely for drivers and teams to err on speeding.

“That dash is electronic, and there’s a little bit of a delay,” Letarte said. “If I text you, it says it was delivered, but is it 1 second or 6 seconds? It doesn’t matter in a text conversation. But it makes a really big difference if you’re trying to run exactly at pit speed.

“The driver controls the speed with his foot, but it takes a few milliseconds of delay (for the speeding gauge). There’s a delay to the dash, and it’s the same for every team.”

There is no speedometer in a Cup car, so drivers must rely on other means for limiting their speeds since electronic timing was introduced in the pits 13 years ago. After once using tachometer meters, teams now use a system of lights connected to the tach.

“The only reason people speed is there’s an advantage to be had,” Letarte said. “It’s real simple, with the diameter of the tire, you can tell the RPM you’re shooting for from the engine.

“Forever you had this cool little tach, and you just had to look at the needle, like in your car.”

But that’s changed with the introduction of lights that are based on data received from the digital dash.

And with NASCAR virtually doubling the number of timing zones in the pits since the midpoint of last year (speeding is measured by time over distance), there’s less margin for error.

Teams are given a buffer of 5 mph over the speed limit, and Letarte said teams easily could avoid getting busted if they played it safe – but no one can.

“If you shot for 58 (with a 60 mph limit), you couldn’t be over because of this so-called delay,” Letarte said. “But you can’t because the next guy is going for 59.5 mph.”

Other topics discussed

–How crew chiefs handle a postrace confrontation similar to Kyle Busch and Joey Logano at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. “The only person who has the ability to make the decision (to fight) is the driver,” Letarte said.

–Whether the lower downforce rules package is having an impact on racing in the 2017 Cup season (with respectful apologies and sincere gratitude to SiriusXM Satellite Radio host Pete Pistone for inadvertently suggesting the topic).

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone. It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify and a host of other smartphone apps.

 

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 70: The 2018 Camry

Michael L. Levitt
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It’s a common practice for automakers to make next year’s model available in showrooms with a few months remaining in the previous year.

But racing next year’s model a year ahead of time?

That’s why it’s notable that the debut of the 2018 Camry in the NASCAR Cup Series occurred roughly seven months before the production version is on sale to the public.

“What’s unique is we made the decision early on to bring this to the track before the cars are being sold in the showrooms,” Toyota Racing Development president David Wilson said on the latest edition of the NASCAR on NBC podcast. “That’s very aggressive. Normally, the cadence is to wait until Daytona 2018. The reason was we were so enamored with the new car. The styling was so spectacular.

“We decided to take this on, and it’s a tremendous burden on ourselves and the team partners because we were developing this car, running this in the wind tunnel, months before the public would see anything.”

The development of the 2018 Camry, which was kept under heavy wraps for months leading up to its 2017 Daytona 500 debut, was the subject of the latest NASCAR on NBC podcast.

Wilson explained the competition side of fine-tuning the car in the first half of the podcast, while Calty Design Research’s Kevin Hunter and Ian Cartabiano explained how the car was developed in the studio.

Hunter and Cartabiano both worked on the Camry street car before moving to the racing version.

“The TRD guys allow us to throw out the first ball,” Hunter said. “We give them what we think it should look like, a good rendition based on the parameters. They absorb and decide what’s good and what’s bad.

“There was a real strong ambition to make this car really cool and keep the production car identity. It’s the most sculptural race car to date.”

Cartabiano, who grew up a Bill Elliott and Davey Allison fan, working on a stock car was a dream come true.

“This was the job I always wanted,” said Cartabiano, who has worked on seven production vehicles for Toyota. “Having the opportunity to design a new Camry and coming back to the home studio and make a new NASCAR version. To design and draw and make a race car that’s not just a sketch but really well thought out, that’s a really cool challenge, which makes it fun.”

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone. It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify and a host of other smartphone apps.

 

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 69: Kyle Busch vs. Joey Logano

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The postrace brouhaha was the theme of a special episode of the NASCAR on NBC podcast with Sunday’s memorable scene in the pits at Las Vegas Motor Speedway remaining a top story.

NASCAR officials indicated Monday that Busch, who attempted to throw a punch at Logano, is unlikely to face punishment for his actions, and team members in the scrum also might escape penalties.

NBC Sports.com’s NASCAR reporters Nate Ryan and Dustin Long discussed their reactions to the postrace squabble Monday morning.

Among the topics discussed:

–Whether a driver should be suspended for connecting with a punch;

–Precedents that have been set by NASCAR in such situations;

–The role of crew members in pit scuffles;

–Logano’s penchant for standing his ground and how it might have helped thrust him into the center of many feuds with veterans.

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on iTunes by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone. It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify and a host of other smartphone apps.