NASCAR on NBC podcast

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NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 91: Tony Stewart on racing in Global Rallycross and other series

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With his NASCAR career over, Tony Stewart has the freedom to drive whatever he chooses, but he still might not have the time to do it all.

During a recent episode of the NASCAR on NBC podcast, Stewart said Steve Arpin had called him many times about being a teammate in the Global Rallycross series.

“I’m very interested in doing that,” Stewart said on the podcast. “We’ve been playing phone tag back and forth trying to get organized to have a conversation about it. We just have so much stuff going on, it’s a good problem to have. It’s nice to be so busy that it’s hard to find time to do all the things we want to do.”

The three-time Cup Series champion, who also has indicated a desire to run the 24 Hours of Le Mans, made his debut this year in the Little 500, a 500-lap sprint car race on a high-banked quarter-mile track in Anderson, Indiana. Stewart finished third in a race that features the rarity of pit stops for race cars without clutches.

“It was a really big toss-up between racing the Little 500, a bucket list item for me, or going to Monaco for the Formula One race,” he said.

Next year, Stewart plans to be in Monte Carlo with co-owner Gene Haas to watch the Haas F1 team.

“It’s cool to be checking boxes off,” he said.

During the podcast, Stewart also discussed:

–The meticulous preparation necessary to get his Eldora Speedway ready for a dirt-track event;

–What appeals to a driver about racing on dirt;

–The state of safety in dirt racing;

–Adapting to sprint cars this year after a long layoff.

A new role driving his team’s souvenir trailer.

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone. It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

NASCAR America: Matt DiBenedetto is more than a driver with a long last name (video)

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Matt DiBenedetto was a guest on this week’s NASCAR on NBC podcast with Nate Ryan. During their chat, which covered how his family moved to North Carolina to further his career when he was younger, his positive outlook on matters and his life, he was played a tape SiriusXM NASCAR Radio uses of people, including Dale Earnhardt Jr., mispronouncing his last name.

To think of DiBenedetto as someone who a long last name is to overlook what he’s done this year.

Although DiBenedetto drives for a single-car team, Go Fas Racing, he is one of four drivers to have placed in the top 10 in both the Daytona 500 and Brickyard 400 this year. He was ninth at Daytona and eighth at Indianapolis. The others who posted top 10s in each race are Kasey Kahne (seventh at Daytona, won Indy), AJ Allmendinger (third at Daytona, 10th at Indy) and Joey Logano (sixth at Daytona, fourth at Indy).

NASCAR on NBC analyst Dale Jarrett discussed what stands out to him about DiBenedetto on Friday’s NASCAR America.

“I’m most impressed with his attitude and just the desire and determination he brings,” Jarrett said.

“I really like the determination and the passion he has to be a race driver, but yet understand his position right now at this point, he wants to move forward but he’s OK where he is right now.”

For more on DiBenedeetto, watch the video above.

You can listen to the NASCAR on NBC podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify and a host of other smartphone apps.

 

Podcast: Tony Stewart on a new role driving his team’s T-shirt trailer

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Tony Stewart is enjoying his new life of driving – and not just behind the wheel of a sprint car again.

In his first year without racing NASCAR in 18 seasons, the three-time Cup champion is logging as many hours on the interstate as on the track, driving the Ford pickup truck that pulls his team’s T-shirt trailer between races.

“It’s nice to get on the road, driving down the interstate,” Stewart said on the NASCAR on NBC podcast. “You can think of a lot of things, you can also just have time to not think of anything and just relax. Driving down the road is a good opportunity just to do that.”

During one recent stretch, Stewart drove the truck to a track near Madison, Wisconsin. After arriving midafternoon and racing, he left at 1 a.m. and drove until 5:30 a.m. After a six-hour break, he and the team completed the drive to Knoxville Raceway in Iowa for a Saturday night race that ended around 11 p.m.

Stewart then drove the trailer back to his team’s shop in Brownsburg, Indiana, arriving around 8 a.m. He reached his house near Columbus an hour later and slept until late afternoon.

The souvenir business is strong enough in dirt-track racing to make the road trips worth the effort. Kyle Larson’s success in sprint cars this year has put the spotlight on the disparity between merchandise profits for drivers in Cup vs. grassroots.

“I know it’s been a controversy, but everywhere we’ve gone and taken our souvenir trailer, we’ve done great with it,” Stewart said on the podcast. “I know for the drivers whose full-time job is driving race cars, that T-shirt business is huge. Thank God it’s not under the NASCAR side of it, or these guys wouldn’t be making anything on souvenirs. The guys on the NASCAR side aren’t making squat on souvenirs, and it’s something that ticks me off daily. The drivers who worked their entire life to build their brands aren’t making the most money on it.”

Four days after recording the podcast, Stewart won his second sprint car race of the season, which he described as “a challenge.

“It’s not been near as easy as I’d like it to be,” said Stewart, who has struggled to adapt his cars and style to a different tire. “But that’s why l like going sprint car racing, too, because it’s not easy. It’s really difficult.”

What has been easier for him is the pace of life without the demands of being a full-time NASCAR driver. As an owner of various racetracks, companies, series and teams, Stewart faced as much pressure from outside the car while trying to race Cup.

“We’ve got a lot of things on our plate,” he said. “This has taken a ton of stress out. The workload is higher now, but I’m having fun doing the work that I’m doing. It’s definitely been the right move for me.”

It also has allowed for some unique freelancing for Stewart, who raced in the prestigious Little 500 for the first time this year and plans to become a regular at an annual three-quarter midget race at the Columbus, Indiana, fair (along with attending the Monaco Grand Prix next year). A one-off ride in the Global Rallycross series also is a possibility.

“It’s nice to be so busy that it’s hard to find time to do all the things we want to do,” he said.

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify and a host of other smartphone apps.

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 90: Roger Slack

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Eldora Speedway general manager Roger Slack joined the NASCAR on NBC podcast to discuss his track’s past, present and possible future with NASCAR.

Slack detailed the run-up to the initial “secret” test with Tony Stewart and Richard Childress Racing’s Austin Dillon that led to scheduling a Camping World Truck Series race that recently completed its fifth edition.

Slack also discussed the storied history of Eldora, which opened in 1954 and was bought by Stewart 50 years later.

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on Google Play, Spotify and a host of other smartphone apps.

NASCAR on NBC podcast, Ep. 89: Slugger Labbe

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Slugger Labbe has a memento from his 2011 Brickyard 400 victory that tells a deeper story than just a race-winning trophy.

In the home office of the veteran crew chief is a deformed piston from Paul Menard’s No. 27 Chevrolet that triumphed at Indianapolis Motor Speedway by stretching its final tank of fuel far enough to beat the faster Chevy of Jeff Gordon.

“The pistons were melted because he had saved so much fuel running partial throttle that the pistons got so hot,” Labbe said on the NASCAR on NBC podcast. “You look at that and ask, ‘How did this ever happen? We shouldn’t have finished that race. The motor should have blown up.

“Fortunately, he did a great job saving fuel that day. To win at Indy was a great accomplishment.”

Labbe, who has been working as an NBCSN analyst since leaving his role as the crew chief of Austin Dillon’s No. 3 Chevrolet two months ago, recounted is many accomplishments from a three-decade career in NASCAR during the podcast.

His first victory came in the July 2002 race at Daytona International Speedway with Michael Waltrip, who also won the 2003 Daytona 500 with Labbe.

There were more wins with Waltrip and Jeremy Mayfield for Labbe, but he wasn’t atop the pit box for one of his most emotional victories. Dillon won the Coca-Cola 600 in the race after Labbe’s departure from Richard Childress Racing.

One of the first to greet Dillon in victory lane at Charlotte Motor Speedway was Labbe, who was at the track spotting for the team.

“No, I don’t get credit for the win, and I don’t want to get credit for the win,” he said. “But I know deep down in my heart there was a lot my hard work and everyone else’s work and my leadership that went into that car.”

During the podcast, Labbe also discussed:

–His spontaneous decision to move from Maine to North Carolina by catching a ride with a NASCAR team one day;

–How much the role of a crew chief changed;

–Why he always has enjoyed doing media interviews and his recent foray into TV.

You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the AudioBoom embed below or download and subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts by clicking here. The free subscription will provide automatic downloads of new episodes to your smartphone.

It also is available on Stitcher by clicking here and also can be found on a host of other smartphone apps.