Larry McReynolds

Photo by Rainier Ehrhardt/Getty Images

Team owner Brad Daugherty joins SiriusXM NASCAR Radio lineup

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Brad Daugherty, co-owner of JTG Daugherty, will co-host “The Late Shift” on Monday nights, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio announced Friday. Daugherty will begin Feb. 19, the day after the Daytona 500.

Daugherty will join co-host Brad Gillie.

Larry McReynolds will co-host the show on Tuesday nights. Former co-host Kenny Wallace will remain as a part-time host.

During an appearance Friday morning on “The Morning Drive,” Daugherty discussed his new opportunity and more, including a spending cap and escalating costs in the sport.

On costs and a spending cap in the sport, Daugherty said:

“The biggest challenge for me would be if that happened, the first thing that would have to happen would be a collective bargaining process, which could happen, but then there would have to be a tremendous revenue sharing in all the resources that are available to NASCAR and to the sport because then you’re cutting out equal chunks of the pie like baseball, like basketball and like football,” he said. “Now these race teams, which we have our charters, they could become true commodities. I don’t think you can do it in racing simply because the are so many moving pieces and parts. The other sports are pretty much straight forward and simple.

“When you have so many vendors that participate on a weekly basis in this sport like they do now, it makes it almost impossible to control those costs unless you have just one supplier for everything throughout the sport and then that doesn’t make sense because then you don’t know if you’re getting the best equipment available throughout the sport.

“When you are talking about mechanical things, pieces and parts and vendors, it’s almost impossible to put that all under thumb and to create some kind of cap. It would be unfair. I think if you have your revenue stream and you’re able to take your revenue stream to produce opportunities for your company, based upon the rulebook and based upon the rules that are legislated through the sport, I think that’s as fair as it gets. Now, one guy can outspend another. I just think that is the way it is. It has always been that way. I really don’t have a problem with that.

“The spending, though, we need to find better ways to control costs … just the weekly stuff. Goodyear does a great job with trying to control costs for us. Our brake packages and stuff like that are creeping up on price. Probably 12 years ago, a brake package at Daytona probably costs us about $4,500. Last year, we ran the same speed 12-13 years ago, that brake package was $45,000. Those types of costs within the sport need to be monitored a little bit better, I do believe that will help us.

“Even with that, the guy who can put his dollars in the right position and run his race team, these businesses are not like any other businesses on the face of the planet. They’re not like other sports business, the compression chart when you look at how these things are put together with executives and individuals and aeronautical engineers and crew people. It’s not the same. It’s just a unique sport that I don’t think you can actually get a tremendous grasp on fiscally just because of all the moving pieces and parts available. I like having all the pieces and parts available to my race team. It’s up to me or (co-owner) Tad (Geschickter) or Jodi (Geschickter) to go out and find the money to implement them.”

One Hot Night: 25 years later, memories of All-Star Race ruled by ‘Forces of Darkness’

Charlotte Motor Speedway
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CONCORD, N.C. –  Roughly 40 minutes after the 1992 Winston ended in smoke, sparks and battered sheet metal, at least 1,000 fans still occupied the stands.

They were still trying to wrap their minds around it all.

TNN pit reporter Glenn Jarrett was tasked with talking to Richard Petty after his final start in the All-Star Race.

When Jarrett found him, Petty was looking out at the fans, still drenched in the brand-new lights surrounding Charlotte Motor Speedway.

Petty turned to Jarrett and pointed.

“These people think we’re going to go back out there and do this again?” The King asked in disbelief.

In those stands was Kyle Petty. The SABCO Racing driver, along with unofficial bodyguard Eddie Gossage, was walking through enemy territory.

Without an elevator available, they had to walk all the way to the press box. They ascended the steps through verbal and physical projectiles, all so Petty could tell his side of the story that was the last lap.

Petty appeared to touch Earnhardt in Turn 3 (he didn’t), turning him sideways. Then his contact with Davey Allison at the finish line caused the first night race on a 1.5-mile speedway to end in a “shower of sparks” and with Allison in the hospital.

“Every freaking fan in the grandstands is teed off,” Kyle Petty says. “According to every fan, I wrecked Earnhardt going into Turn 3 and I wrecked Davey (at the start-finish line). That’s a fact. … I’m telling you, they were going to kill my butt. It was ugly. ”

In the garage, Larry McReynolds sat on a cooler next to the hauler for Allison’s No. 28 Ford.

The 33-year-old crew chief had just left the infield care center. Allison, after being taken there by ambulance, had left the track via helicopter to a hospital.

McReynolds just sat there, “trying to figure out what the hell just all happened.”

Kyle Petty, Larry McReynolds and Mike Joy at a recent event honoring “One Hot Night.” Photo: Daniel McFadin

THE FORCES OF DARKNESS

When McReynolds watched the leaders of The Winston enter Turn 1 for the final time on May 16, 1992, he thought his car was going to finish third behind Earnhardt and Kyle Petty.

Had he been right, those gathered around a long table in Charlotte’s Speedway Club on a Tuesday night 25 years later might have had other plans.

Among the attendees are Petty, McReynolds, Michael Waltrip, announcer Mike Joy and former crew chief Robin Pemberton.

On a plasma TV at the far end of the table, the broadcast of the 1992 Winston, also known as “One Hot Night,” silently runs in all its standard definition glory.

The sounds of a Camping World Truck Series test session dominate the air outside the club’s windows.

Over the course of the evening, the familiar images shown every May play out in their natural context. At one point or another, everyone’s past peers out from the TV.

Joy, the lead announcer for TNN’s broadcast, doesn’t speak too much this night. But when he does, he makes it count.

“Being a full moon Saturday night, this race was completely unkind to white cars,” Joy says. “This is going to come down to three black cars in the end. The forces of darkness, whatever you want to call it.”

After an hour of conversation and jokes, everyone’s attention turns to the TV for the last segment and then the final lap. The final lap by which all final laps have been judged since.

For half of it, McReynolds lived vicariously through a crew member named Roman. The crew member had flipped a 55-gallon barrel over and stood atop it to watch the race’s conclusion.

“All of a sudden the crowd is going crazy,” says McReynolds, wearing a vintage Texaco/Havoline blazer. “Then I saw Roman, his eyes were as big as saucers. I was like, ‘What the f— are they doing back there?’”

When the leaders reappeared exiting Turn 4, Allison and Petty were door-to-door with Earnhardt nowhere in sight.

“When they came off (Turn) 4 like that, I said ‘I know who’s going to win that drag race, Robert Yates,’ ” McReynolds says proudly of his former car owner and engine builder.

Photo by Daniel McFadin

What happened next was depicted on a painting sitting near the other end of the table. Allison’s car pointing backwards, about to impact the outside wall after taking the checkered flag and making contact with Petty. A spinning Earnhardt is shown in the background.

“It’s like two runners running for the (finish) line and you didn’t think about what was beyond that line,” McReynolds says.

“You just saw the line,” Petty says. “It’s like when you break that tape, you fall.”

The crash put Allison in the hospital until Monday, sent fans into frenzy and resulted in a rival’s car sitting in Allison’s hauler.

Davey Allison races during the 1992 Winston. (Photo by RacingOne/Getty Images)

FRENEMIES

As McReynolds sat on his cooler processing the night’s events, he thought about the near future.

“Our team had been through so much,” McReynolds says. “We had an unbelievable start. We won the Daytona 500 … we won North Wilkesboro (and Talladega). But were kind of going through a pattern. Winning one week and wrecking one week. … Here we figured out how to do both in the same night. But we were out of cars.”

From the garage appeared Tim Brewer, crew chief for Bill Elliott’s Junior Johnson-owned car.

“I don’t even know what to say to you, I guess I want to say I’m sorry, but then I also need to say congratulations,” Brewer said.

“This is not good, Tim,” McReynolds responded. “We’re out of frickin’ race cars.”

McReynolds told Brewer he had a brand new intermediate car for the Coke 600, a road course car and two speedway cars. He needed a backup car.

“I’ll give you guys a car,” Brewer said. “You keep it as long as you want, use it if you want to.”

The whole month of June, Robert Yates Racing hauled a Budweiser car with Texaco/Havoline decals stuck in the window, just in case.

Davey Allison celebrates winning the 1991 Winston, one year before “One Hot Night.”(Photo by Dozier Mobley/Getty Images)

NO HARSH WORDS

Even as Petty walked through the angry grandstands, he was concerned for his friend, Allison. Petty would call Allison two days later.

“I talked to Davey on Monday, I think he was still at the hospital when I talked to him,” Petty says. “He had a Busch (Xfinity) car and I was going to drive it over here the next week just to shut everybody up. But we couldn’t work it out with Ford and Pontiac.”

While fans may have wanted or expected there to be bad feelings between Allison and Petty, they were disappointed.

“I can say by the time I got to the hospital, there was never a negative word toward Kyle, between the 42 and the 28, it never even crossed our minds,” McReynolds says. “Two months later at Pocono with (Darrell Waltrip), that’s a whole ‘nother story.”

Anyone wanting bad blood between the drivers wasn’t aware of the nature of the relationship between the men who came of age in NASCAR’s garages.

“Davey and I were competitors, but there was never a rivalry,” Petty says. “We grew up together. We grew up in the garage area when we were 10 years old and (NASCAR official) Bill Gazaway trying to throw us out and running him through the garage area.

“We grew up at the swimming pool at the Sea Dip in Daytona Beach, Florida, swimming together and playing together. … Then he started racing and I was working with my dad, we didn’t see each other in those years. Then all of a sudden you’re back at the race track racing against each other. We never had harsh words. I never in my whole life, in my whole career racing against Davey in any way shape or form ever remember having anything but respect and a good relationship. There was no base for that, even after that wreck, there was nothing there.”

What about Earnhardt?

“Earnhardt’s OK, he’s not mad,” Petty says. “He’s mad, but not mad at anybody.”

Dale Earnhardt Sr. poses in Victory Lane with his two sons, Dale Earnhardt Jr., left, and Kerry Earnhardt, right, after winning the Coca-Cola 600 race on May 24, 1992, one week after “One Hot Night. (Photo by Dozier Mobley/Getty Images)

‘TIME HAS REALLY GOTTEN MESSED UP’

The passage of time has a weird way of reminding you it’s relative.

Just ask NASCAR drivers.

“You know what’s crazy to me? ’92 seems like a thousand years ago,” Waltrip says. “And nine years later was ‘01 when Dale died and that seems like yesterday.”

“I know, it does,” Petty agrees.

“Time had really gotten messed up for me,” says Waltrip, who won the Winston Open that preceded “One Hot Night” and later won the 1996 All-Star Race.

“I know … the same thing with Adam,” says Petty of his son who was killed in an accident during Busch Series practice in 2000 at New Hampshire Motor Speedway. “Everything before Adam’s accident sounds like it was history. A million years ago.”

“It’s a blur?” someone asks.

“No, it’s just a long time ago,” Petty answers. ‘You know what I mean? … It feels like it was yesterday. It really does. Everything’s happened, like we were talking about how this years’ gone so fast, it’s like everything’s just sped up.”

Whether they’ve sped along or crept by, the 25 years since “One Hot Night” are punctuated by those who are not cutting it up with everyone in the Speedway Club.

Fourteen months after winning the race the helped define the sport for a generation, Allison died at 32 from injuries sustained in a helicopter accident at Talladega Superspeedway. He would have turned 56 in February.

A week after “One Hot Night,” Earnhardt won the Coke 600 for the third time. Earnhardt raced eight more seasons and won two more championships before being killed on the last lap of the 2001 Daytona 500 at 49.

“By Davey not being here and Dale not being here now, that adds to it,” Petty says, now 56 and a NBC Sports analyst nine years after leaving the cockpit. “That’s a moment for (them). That changes how you perceive this race as you look back at it. If we were all three sitting here laughing about it and complaining about it, you may view it different. You wouldn’t view it in that nostalgic tone as much as you do now.”

The weight of the race and its impact on the trajectory of NASCAR didn’t hit McReynolds until the race’s 20th anniversary. In 2012, he, Pemberton and Joy sat on an infield stage at Charlotte to discuss the race with fans. Instead of his blazer, McReynolds wore his old team uniform.

“Honestly, that’s when it really sunk in me that was something pretty big and special,” McReynolds says.

“One Hot Night” was an exhibition. The eighth of 31 times the All-Star Race has been run.

Petty admits in its immediate wake, he considered it “just another race.”

“It lived up to every bit of the hype, like few things in sports do,” Petty says. “Rarely do things ever live up to the hype that you throw at them. The funny part in this sport … We’ve witnessed … some really great races. Some incredible races. Everywhere. But they don’t stick with you the way this race sticks with you. For some reason this race sticks with fans different than other races stick with you.”

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Davey Allison’s legacy lives on through family and friends

Kelly Crandall / NBC Sports
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CHARLOTTE — The four of them sat on a makeshift stage at the NASCAR Hall of Fame and were ready, if not appearing a bit apprehensive, to turn around.

There was the son who lost his father before the age of 2, Robbie Allison. Next to him sat his grandfather, 1983 Cup champion Bobby Allison. Then came a former crew chief and a close friend of both Allisons, Larry McReynolds. Finally, another friend, and son of a famous car owner, Lorin Ranier.

But the group did turn and watch as a car cover was removed. With it went the butterflies, replaced by broad smiles and a rush of memories at the sight of the No. 28 Ford Thunderbird driven by Davey Allison in his rookie Cup Series season for Ranier-Lundy Racing. The car proudly taking its place with the rest of those deemed iconic enough to be on Glory Road.

“It was just such a great feeling,” Bobby Allison said of seeing the car. “I was really bonded with the car all the way through. I had driven for that team (Ranier Racing) earlier and then (Davey) got in the car, and it was the black-and-white deal and evolved from that into the black Havoline special, the Texaco star. Just so many good things about it. The good wins that he had. Just made me feel great.”

Pride emanated from all four individuals throughout the event. Especially Bobby, who not only raised Davey with his late wife, Judy, but raced against him from 1985-88. Bobby took a few trips up Glory Road to get a good look at the car and shared his favorite memories of Davey with those who asked. Or at least the ones he can remember.

Bobby carries around a picture in his pocket of the 1988 Daytona 500 that he won with Davey finishing second to remind himself that, “Yeah, that did happen.” (Bobby lost his memory of the win in a crash at Pocono Raceway a few months later.)

Robbie Allison has his own brief memories of his father, who won 19 Cup races in 191 starts, including the 1992 Daytona 500, before his untimely passing in a July 1993 helicopter crash. Robbie, like many others, also repeatedly has heard how his father was destined to become a champion.

Davey, Robbie said, “definitely was as good a father as he was a racer.”

With his car now displayed in the Hall of Fame, it provides Robbie and the others a chance to explain why Davey was as good as many say.

“You have to think about how he grew up,” said Ranier, who shared a picture of the two from when they were teenagers. “His father was an iconic driver, and Davey took advantage of his position, meaning he wasn’t just floating around saying, ‘Hey, Bobby Allison’s my dad, and I can do whatever I want.’ He went and worked his ass off and learned and understood why his dad won races.

“He knew why (Bobby) won and then he just kind of adopted that to himself. Also, too, (Davey) kind of saw the mistakes that his dad made, and he tried not to do that. He had a really cool upbringing to become a great driver, and he was talented. So you mix all that together.”

RICHMOND, VA ? March 7, 1993: Bobby Allison (L) joins his son, Davey Allison, in victory lane at Richmond International Raceway after Davey won the Pontiac Excitement 400 NASCAR Cup race. It would be the younger Allison?s final Cup victory. (Photo by ISC Images & Archives via Getty Images)
RICHMOND, VA March 7, 1993: Bobby Allison (L) joins his son, Davey Allison, in victory lane at Richmond International Raceway after Davey won the Pontiac Excitement 400 NASCAR Cup race. It would be the younger Allison’s final Cup victory. (Photo by ISC Images & Archives via Getty Images)

McReynolds knew Davey as well as anyone.

The two were friendly long before McReynolds became his crew chief and their relationship went far beyond the NASCAR garage. Davey and his wife, Liz, were close friends with McReynolds and his wife, Linda. Robbie Allison and Larry’s son Brandon were born a few months apart and later baptized together. The Allisons were named Brandon’s godparents and the McReynolds the same for Robbie.

Friday, Larry showed up at the Hall of Fame proudly wearing a leather jacket that had been given to Davey’s team many years ago. McReynolds shared the sentiment that Davey was not only talented but a student of the sport.

“He lived, ate and slept racing,” McReynolds said. “I said it at his funeral that we miss him, we’re grieving, but if there’s anybody that’s left this earth that had his priorities in order, Davey Allison was that guy. He enjoyed getting away and doing a little bit of hunting and fishing, but for the most part, especially during the racing season, he would live, sleep, and eat these race cars pretty much from the beginning of February to the middle of November and even during the offseason. It was never good enough, and that’s rubbed off on me.”

The allure of Davey Allison also came in how he was described as a genuinely kind-hearted person off the track.

“It’s funny because when people think about Bobby back in the day, Bobby was a very popular driver, he won like Most Popular Driver (six) times,” Ranier said. “People liked Bobby, but they loved Davey. You know what I mean? They just loved him.”

As did all those in attendance. The group of four along with those who accompanied them were the last ones to leave the Hall of Fame after taking one last look at the car. They did so sharing a common hope for the future.

To McReynolds, Davey Allison’s car being in the Hall of Fame is hopefully just another rung in the ladder. He deserves Ranier said, to climb that ladder to induction into the Hall of Fame. It would give him a permanent place in the Hall alongside his father Bobby, who continues to wait for that day.

“Oh yes,” Bobby said of wanting Davey in the Hall of Fame. “Yes. There’s so many good guys out there, but Davey accomplished so much in that short period of time. Including the Daytona win, the wins around the other big tracks around the country. I’d love to see him in there.”

Mark Martin selected to NMPA Hall of Fame

David Taylor/Allsport
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Mark Martin will be inducted into the National Motorsports Press Association’s Hall of Fame on Jan. 22, 2017, after he was selected on 95 percent of the ballots cast from journalists who cover NASCAR.

Martin was the only person to be selected on at least 65 percent of the ballots, which is required for enshrinement.

Martin won 40 career Sprint Cup races, ranking 17th on the all-time list. He also won 49 Xfinity races and seven Camping World Truck Series events. He was a five-time champion in the International Race of Champions.

Others who received votes but fell short of making the required 65 percent threshold were crew chiefs Kirk Shelmerdine (61 percent), Buddy Parrott (59 percent) and Larry McReynolds (51 percent). Also receiving votes was long-time Martinsville Speedway public relations director Dick Thompson (59 percent). Former driver Dan Gurney and former statistician Bob Latford were named as write-in candidates.

“Those guys are heroes of mine,” Martin said of his fellow nominees. “It is just such an incredible honor to be considered along with them. I feel very fortunate and blessed but most of all I’m thankful. Very thankful.”

The National Motorsports Press Association was formed more than 50 years ago and its membership consists of motorsports writers, broadcasters and photographers from throughout the U.S. and abroad.

The NMPA Hall of Fame, established in 1965, is located on the grounds of Darlington (S.C.) Raceway.

Will 35 become the new retirement age for NASCAR Sprint Cup drivers in the future?

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DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – The push for young talent could lead to a future where talk about drivers retiring begins when they’re 35 years old, says former champion crew chief Ray Evernham.

As 43-year-old Jeff Gordon starts what he says will be his final full Sprint Cup season, when a driver should retire is again a topic. That age once was thought to be 50. Now, it is 45 and could be falling.

“A lot of it has got to do with the technology of the cars, the fact that these kids are coming younger and younger now and it’s a lot more based on engineering,’’ said Evernham, who won three championships as Gordon’s crew chief in the 1990s, of the continued youth movement.

“If you’ve got a 35-year-old driver and a guy who is 21 that you can pay half the money and he’s going twice as fast, you’re going to be looking at that. 10 years from now, they’re going to be talking at 35 that he’s at the end of his career.

“It’s not a trend that the drivers are going to be able to control. It’s going to be like Formula One. It’s going to be controlled for them.’’

Among drivers 35 years old are Carl Edwards and Clint Bowyer. Denny Hamlin, Kasey Kahne and Paul Menard turn 35 this season.

More than a third of the 49 drivers entered for Sunday’s Daytona 500 are 29 years and younger. The group includes Kyle Larson (22 years old), Joey Logano (24) and Kyle Busch (29).

There are nine drivers age 40 or older entered, including Michael Waltrip (51), Tony Stewart (43) and defending Daytona 500 winner Dale Earnhardt Jr. (40). Jimmie Johnson and reigning series champion Kevin Harvick turn 40 this year.

Both Earnhardt and Matt Kenseth (42) have said they plan to race for several more years. Greg Biffle (45) is in the first year of a three-year contract with Roush Fenway Racing.

Even so, the youth movement continues at a gradual pace. When Trevor Bayne scored his shocking Daytona 500 win four years ago at age 20, he was one of 11 drivers in that race age 29 and under. That equaled how many drivers in that race who were age 40 and older.

When Kevin Harvick won the Daytona 500 eight years ago, there were 12 drivers age 29 and younger in the field but 14 drivers age 40 or older in it.

Former champion Darrell Waltrip, an analyst for Fox Sports, says technology is making drivers better at a younger age.

“Here’s what kids have today that drivers didn’t have years ago,’’ he said. “They have all the simulation. They can sit at a computer or a console and run every racetrack that we go to.”

So when they get to the track, these younger drivers are more competitive.

“These kids are winning races already in other series,” Waltrip said. “So they come into Cup experienced veterans almost at 17, 18, 19 year olds. I think technology has changed a lot of things.’’

Just look at Chase Elliott becoming the youngest champion last season in what is now the Xfinity Series at age 19. He’ll make his Sprint Cup debut next month at Martinsville Speedway and take over Gordon’s No. 24 ride next season at Hendrick Motorsports.

There’s another factor that could lead to drivers retiring or cutting back their schedule sooner, notes Fox Sports analyst Larry McReynolds.

“One thing that is different today with these drivers is the outside demands that are on them,’’ he said. “When Darrell was driving, he maybe had a few sponsors. These drivers today, they may have five or six primary sponsor that they’re having to do stuff for on a pretty consistent basis, not to mention all the other things that they have going on. I think it’s a lot of these off-track demands that maybe really takes a toll on them above and beyond what they’re doing on the racetrack.’’

Either way, the challenges could be growing for veteran drivers to keep their rides in the future.