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Team owner Brad Daugherty joins SiriusXM NASCAR Radio lineup

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Brad Daugherty, co-owner of JTG Daugherty, will co-host “The Late Shift” on Monday nights, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio announced Friday. Daugherty will begin Feb. 19, the day after the Daytona 500.

Daugherty will join co-host Brad Gillie.

Larry McReynolds will co-host the show on Tuesday nights. Former co-host Kenny Wallace will remain as a part-time host.

During an appearance Friday morning on “The Morning Drive,” Daugherty discussed his new opportunity and more, including a spending cap and escalating costs in the sport.

On costs and a spending cap in the sport, Daugherty said:

“The biggest challenge for me would be if that happened, the first thing that would have to happen would be a collective bargaining process, which could happen, but then there would have to be a tremendous revenue sharing in all the resources that are available to NASCAR and to the sport because then you’re cutting out equal chunks of the pie like baseball, like basketball and like football,” he said. “Now these race teams, which we have our charters, they could become true commodities. I don’t think you can do it in racing simply because the are so many moving pieces and parts. The other sports are pretty much straight forward and simple.

“When you have so many vendors that participate on a weekly basis in this sport like they do now, it makes it almost impossible to control those costs unless you have just one supplier for everything throughout the sport and then that doesn’t make sense because then you don’t know if you’re getting the best equipment available throughout the sport.

“When you are talking about mechanical things, pieces and parts and vendors, it’s almost impossible to put that all under thumb and to create some kind of cap. It would be unfair. I think if you have your revenue stream and you’re able to take your revenue stream to produce opportunities for your company, based upon the rulebook and based upon the rules that are legislated through the sport, I think that’s as fair as it gets. Now, one guy can outspend another. I just think that is the way it is. It has always been that way. I really don’t have a problem with that.

“The spending, though, we need to find better ways to control costs … just the weekly stuff. Goodyear does a great job with trying to control costs for us. Our brake packages and stuff like that are creeping up on price. Probably 12 years ago, a brake package at Daytona probably costs us about $4,500. Last year, we ran the same speed 12-13 years ago, that brake package was $45,000. Those types of costs within the sport need to be monitored a little bit better, I do believe that will help us.

“Even with that, the guy who can put his dollars in the right position and run his race team, these businesses are not like any other businesses on the face of the planet. They’re not like other sports business, the compression chart when you look at how these things are put together with executives and individuals and aeronautical engineers and crew people. It’s not the same. It’s just a unique sport that I don’t think you can actually get a tremendous grasp on fiscally just because of all the moving pieces and parts available. I like having all the pieces and parts available to my race team. It’s up to me or (co-owner) Tad (Geschickter) or Jodi (Geschickter) to go out and find the money to implement them.”

Charges against men accused in Mike Wallace attack are dismissed

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Charges against the three men accused of attacking former NASCAR driver Mike Wallace and his daughter have been dismissed, according to an ESPN report.

The charges stemmed from a fight June 17 at PNC Amphitheater in Charlotte, North Carolina. Paul Lucas had four misdemeanor assault charges against him dismissed. Two misdemeanor assault charges against both Nathan Lucas (Paul’s brother) and Randolph Magnum were also dismissed, according to the ESPN report.

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Photos of injuries incurred by Mike Wallace and daughter Lindsay Van Wingarden. Photos courtesy Mike Wallace official Facebook page.

Wallace and his daughter, Lindsey Van Wingarden, were injured in the incident, which followed a Rascal Flatts concert at the venue.

MORE: Details emerge in beating of Mike Wallace, including 911 audio tapes

Wallace, 57, suffered a broken tooth, lacerations to his mouth and face and still has black floaters in his right eye, the ESPN report noted.

Van Wingerden, meanwhile, suffered a black eye and broken wrist.

When the case went to trial in October, a mistrial was declared after prosecutors discovered potential witnesses inadvertently were allowed to be in the courtroom and heard testimony.

A new trial was never set and the district attorney’s office dismissed the charges Friday after Wallace and his daughter requested such, ESPN reported.

According to the ESPN report, a court filing quoted prosecutor William Biggers: “In this case, the State is filing this dismissal based on the wishes of the victims.”

Although the criminal charges have been dismissed, Wallace and Van Wingarden still have options for a potential civil lawsuit.

An attorney for Wallace told ESPN that neither he nor Wallace would have any public comment. Wallace, who took to Facebook after the June 17 incident, has not made any additional comment on social media.

Wallace responded to an email from NBC Sports and replied, “Rather not make a comment.”

Mike Wallace, who has not driven in a NASCAR race since 2015, is the brother of NASCAR Hall of Famer Rusty Wallace and racer/broadcaster Kenny Wallace.

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NASCAR HoF nominee Robert Yates being treated for liver cancer

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NASCAR Hall of Fame nominee Robert Yates begins treatment for liver cancer today, his son, Doug Yates, tweeted.

Robert Yates began his racing career at Holman-Moody Racing in 1968 building engines. He moved to NASCAR Hall of Fame Junior Johnson’s team in 1971.

Robert Yates’ engines helped Bobby Allison win the 1983 championship with DiGard Racing. Robert Yates went on to launch his own team, Robert Yates Racing. Davey Allison won the 1992 Daytona 500 with the team and finished third in the points that season. Dale Jarrett won the series title in 1999 and the 1996 and 2000 Daytona 500s with the team.

Robert Yates won 77 NASCAR Sprint Cup races as an engine builder and scored 57 wins and 48 poles as a team owner.

Doug Yates is president and CEO of Roush Yates Engines, which supplies engines to Ford teams.

NASCAR driver Mike Wallace beaten, knocked unconscious; daughter also hurt

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Veteran NASCAR driver Mike Wallace, brother of NASCAR Hall of Famer Rusty Wallace and driver/race analyst Kenny Wallace, is recovering from a brutal beating Friday night, according to several media reports.

Wallace’s daughter, Lindsay, also was reportedly injured.

Mike Wallace reportedly was attacked, being punched and kicked in a parking lot by three men after he, his wife, his daughter and her husband left a Rascal Flatts concert Friday night at the PNC Pavilion in Charlotte.

Wallace, 57, reportedly was knocked unconscious, while Lindsay Wallace Van Wingerden also was treated for unspecified injuries after trying to cover her father’s body in an effort to protect him from further injuries.

Here’s part of a post Mike Wallace put on his Facebook page after being treated at a hospital:

I normally would not post personal affairs but this is to help and give advice to our friends, do not ever talk to a group of now what appeared to be drunk or drugged up young adult men or women when your trying to get in your car to leave the unguarded PNC amphitheater in Charlotte, NC parking lot after a good Rascal Flatts concert. This is what I looked like after I was knocked out and crap beat out of me. The ambulance driver took this picture we were just supposed to gave a fun night. I want to thank my family and friends for helping protect me from a worse beating as I layed unconscious on the ground. What’s worse is three of guys that beat my family up were arrested and out of jail before we got out of the hospital.

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Photos from Mike Wallace’s official Facebook page. The photo on the left is Wallace after the attack, the upper right photo is daughter Lindsay being treated at an area hospital, and the bottom right photo was taken during the Rascal Flatts concert Friday night, shortly before Wallace and his daughter were both attacked and injured. Three men have been arrested in connection with the assaults.

Kenny Wallace took to social media and said his brother received 12 stitches inside his mouth, suffered a dislodged tooth and has had vision problems resulting from the attack. Mike Wallace and his daughter both have been released from the hospital.

Later Sunday, Kenny Wallace told A.J. Perez of USA Today Sports, “Mike was talking to one of the three men and then, out of nowhere, one came after Mike like a crazy man. Mike was knocked out completely cold. While he was on the ground they continued to beat on him, kicking him in the face.”

Paul Lucas, 29, was arrested for misdemeanor assault on a female. He was released on a $1,500 bond. Nathan Lucas, 22, and Randolph Magnum, 24, were each arrested for misdemeanor assault and released on a $1,000 bond, according to the Mecklenburg County Sheriff’s Office.

All three men were given a July 22 court appearance.

“I talked to Mike a couple times this weekend and he’s just in shock,” Kenny Wallace told USA Today. “He can’t believe it happened.”

Mike Wallace made more than 800 starts across the Sprint Cup, Xfinity and Camping World Truck Series. He has four Xfinity victories and five in the Camping World Truck Series. His most recent two NASCAR starts were in the 2015 season openers for the Sprint Cup and Xfinity series at Daytona International Speedway.

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When a career ends, only a few hear the cheers

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BRISTOL, Tenn. — For many athletes, the cheers often are for someone else. Only a few bathe in the crescendoing chorus that celebrates a lifetime’s achievement.

Within the past six months, three of sport’s more recognized names — Gordon, Manning and Kobe — retired, walking away with highlight moments. Two of them, Jeff Gordon and Peyton Manning, will be at Bristol Motor Speedway for today’s Food City 500.

While Gordon didn’t win in his final NASCAR Sprint Cup start — he was one of four drivers racing for the championship — his November victory at Martinsville Speedway, where he jumped and shouted with childlike glee, provides an indelible image.

Three months later, Manning, who will be an honorary race official today, won the Super Bowl and left the NFL as a champion.

This past week, Kobe Bryant unleashed an awe-inducing 60-point performance in his final NBA game for the Los Angeles Lakers.

As time passes, none will be remembered as much for what they did in their final days competing but what they accomplished throughout their career.

That is why celebrities came to their final curtain call and fans showered these stars with adulation. For such celebrations, though, there are many other athletes who exit without fanfare or never know when their final event is until its well past.

LOOKING BACK

Carl Long leans against a stack of tires behind pit wall at Bristol Motor Speedway. Once a top driver at his local track, he moved up NASCAR’s ranks with limited success. He continues to race in the Xfinity Series because he can’t race in the Sprint Cup Series.

He still owes NASCAR $200,000 for a fine incurred in 2009 when his engine was found to be too large. Until the fine is paid, Long can’t drive in the Cup series.

“I’ve come to the reality for me to come up with $200,000 to pay the fine to go back on the other side and then to generate money to drive a car …’’ he said as his voice tails off.

His last Cup start in a points race came in 2006 in the Bristol summer night race. It was an event he wasn’t supposed to have run. When a car aligned with Long’s ride made the field but was left on the bubble in qualifying, Long said word was passed down to him not to bump the car because it was higher in points. He eased through his qualifying lap but still ran fast enough to make the show.

His race featured four penalties, including three for speeding on pit road, an engine that sputtered and hummed alternately and an upset stomach. After falling several laps behind, and the engine issues continuing, Long parked the car to avoid a wreck and immediately ran to the bathroom.

He attempted to make other Cup points races afterward but didn’t. Then came the penalty. And he was gone from that garage.

While circumstances differ, others also don’t know when their last Cup start has come.

David Gilliland has 330 career Sprint Cup starts and finished second twice, but he didn’t have a full-time ride after last season. He attempted to make the Daytona 500 in a third Front Row Motorsports car but didn’t. He said he’ll be entered at Talladega Superspeedway in a couple of weeks but doesn’t know if he’ll be in a Cup car for any additional events beyond that.

Brian Vickers said he wasn’t sure if he would be racing again after having to sit out multiple times because of blood clots. He’s returned to run select races for Tony Stewart, who is recovering from a back injury suffered in an all-terrain vehicle crash in January. Once Stewart returns for what will be his final season, Vickers will be left without a ride. Will it be his last or just an interlude?

BOTH SIDES

Kenny Wallace could not have imagined that when he climbed from his car after finishing 12th at Talladega in October 2008 he would not compete in a Cup series race again. He never won a Cup race in 344 starts. Three times he finished second, including a memorable runner-up run to Dale Earnhardt in what was Earnhardt’s last win in 2000 at Talladega.

“I have had a wonderful career and a wonderful life, but I will go to my grave upset on the inside, not fulfilled that I never won a Cup race,’’ Wallace said. “It bothers me. It is very disappointing.’’

For a driver who never made it Victory Lane in a Cup race, Wallace’s TV duties included doing shows from that location after races.

“That was the hardest thing on me, watching drivers drive into Victory Lane,’’ he said.

Nine times in the Xfinity Series, Wallace made that drive. After limited duty in 2013-14, he returned in 2015 for three races and made the exit in that series he never got a chance to do in Cup.

His record 547th Xfinity start took place last August at Iowa Speedway and became a celebration. His picture was put on a billboard at the track. He was in a Joe Gibbs Racing car. He was feted before the race for his accomplishments.

“It’s not that I needed to be loved,’’ Wallace said. “It made me feel good the everybody at Iowa recognized me, that I lived this sport. One of the things I’ll never forget is Wayne Auton, the boss of the Xfinity Series, he stood up in the drivers meeting … he said (of Wallace) ‘One of the best there ever was in the Xfinity Series.’ It caught me off guard.

“A week later, I said ‘Wayne you overdid that, I was not one of the best there ever was.’ He said, ‘Kenny Wallace, you don’t know it, but you were.’ ‘’

LOOKING AHEAD 

Gordon is gone. Stewart will be after this season. Three other Cup champions — Kevin Harvick, Jimmie Johnson and Matt Kenseth — are 40 or older. The sport’s most popular driver, Dale Earnhardt Jr., is 41. None has stated they plan to retire soon, but they likely will be among those who get to choose when they leave the sport.

“Very few people get to do it on their own terms,’’ Kenseth said. “Even though I’ve been here for a long time, I never dreamed in a million years growing up in Wisconsin racing a little Late Model car that we bought for $1,800 at a little quarter-mile track that I would ever be able to do any of this stuff. Like Jeff’s been able to do and Tony … they can do it on their own terms. Yeah, if you had a choice, that’s what you want to do.”

Earnhardt, a boxing fan, cites famous boxers who did not exit with victories in their final bouts and says that didn’t diminish their aura.

“I don’t know if it’s key, critical that you have that great last race or go out on top,’’ Earnhardt said. “It’s awesome if you can. A lot of guys love it so much that they don’t know how to go out when maybe they should. Or maybe they financially can’t and have to keep competing.

“I’ve always said I hope I get to make the choice on how I want to end my career, and hopefully, it’s not decided for me. When that time comes, I will handle it how I need to handle it and run as hard as I can run.’’

And when he exits the car, he’ll likely hear those cheers saved for very few.