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Jeff Gordon, Tony Stewart elected to Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame

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The two NASCAR drivers arguably most associated with Indianapolis Motor Speedway have been elected to the track’s newly rechristened Hall of Fame.

Jeff Gordon and Tony Stewart, who combined to win the Brickyard 400 seven times, will be enshrined in the Hall of Fame on May 24.

The announcement came Tuesday on “Founders Day,” the 109th anniversary of the day the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Company was officially formed.

They are the first to be enshrined under the Hall’s new framework, which includes the Brickyard 400 and United States Grand Prix at Indianapolis for the first time.

Gordon, a four-time Cup champion, and Stewart, a three-time Cup champion, were selected from a ballot of 14 nominees by a panel of auto racing journalists, participants and historians.

“We are thrilled that the first class of inductees with our new name and election criteria honor two drivers who mean so much to fans in Central Indiana and around the world” said Tony George, president of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Foundation in a press release.

Both Gordon and Stewart, who made their final Cup starts at IMS in 2016, have called Indiana home.

Gordon grew up and went to High School in Pittsboro, Indiana, after moving from California. Stewart is a native of Columbus, Indiana.

Gordon won the inaugural Brickyard 400 in 1994 and went on to win the race in 1998, 2001, 2004 and in 2014.

Stewart won the race in 2005 and 2007.

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Kevin Harvick glad to see evolving Cup schedule, but wants more changes

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CHARLOTTE, North Carolina – If Charlotte Motor Speedway hosts a Cup race on its infield road course just once it would be worth it to Kevin Harvick.

For Harvick, the buzz around the Sept. 30 event is an example of what good can come from experimenting with the 36-race Cup schedule.

“If we don’t ever run it again, think about all the conversation that it has created,” Harvick said Tuesday at the NASCAR Media Tour. “If you did it every year, it would just be another race. Those are the types of things that we need to create. We need to create events and moments.”

The Stewart-Haas Racing driver has been one of the most outspoken drivers in recent years regarding a desire for NASCAR to shake up its schedules, including a return to short tracks in the Truck Series.

In 2015, Harvick said 90 percent of tracks that host Cup events should only have one race a year. A few months later he advocated moving Saturday night races to Sunday afternoons and said Iowa Speedway should be given a Cup race.

Harvick expressed approval of changes NASCAR has made this year, including the swapping of race dates.

“You see Richmond in the playoffs (Sept. 22) and Indy in a date (Sept.  9) where the fans can sit in the stands and not burn their rear ends off,” Harvick said.

Another change is Las Vegas Motor Speedway hosting two Cup races, including the playoff opener on Sept. 16. The second race date was moved from New Hampshire Motor Speedway. Both tracks are owned by Speedway Motorsports, Inc.

“Going to Vegas to kickoff the playoffs is a good move from a market standpoint,” Harvick said. “It is a great race track but the market itself is something you have to pay attention to.”

According to, the average temperature in Las Vegas on Sept. 16 is 93 degrees.

Harvick, the 2014 Cup champion, also expressed his desire for a rotation of the championship race.

The Cup season has ended at Homestead-Miami Speedway, a 1.5-mile oval, since 2002.

“I think it gets stale,” Harvick said. “It is a great race track but it isn’t all about the race track. It is about the event. How many times have you had a crappy Super Bowl but everybody goes to the Super Bowl because it is an event. That is what we need to create.”

The swapping of race dates and the creation of the Charlotte road course have occurred while NASCAR is in the middle of a five-year sanctioning agreement with tracks. The agreement ends in 2020.

Harvick presented other ideas for getting tracks more attention and creating unique events, including the prospect of a wild card race.

He also believes tracks should be able to lease their race dates to other tracks, especially when they’re undergoing renovations.

“You renovate your race track, then you have the right to take your date and lease it to someone else during the renovation process so that you can go try new markets and you can go have a unique event,” Harvick said. “Then that gives that particular race track a grace period to get all the work done and not have a race so they can keep working and get the renovations done in a shorter amount of time. That allows you to keep the race tracks renovated and still make money off their race by working a deal out with another race track with their sanctioning agreement.”

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Xfinity Series to use Indianapolis package at Michigan, Pocono in 2018

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NASCAR Xfinity teams will use the drafting package that debuted at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in July also at Michigan International Speedway and Pocono Raceway next season, the sanctioning body announced Wednesday.

William Byron won at Indy in July. That race featured an event-record 16 leads changes in 100 laps. The previous record for lead changes in that race was nine.

NASCAR equipped cars with aero ducts, a different spoiler (64 3/4 inches wide and 6 inches tall) and a 7/8-inch restrictor plate for that Indianapolis race. All of those items also will be used at Michigan and Pocono next year.

Some drivers liked the package at Indianapolis, but Kyle Busch did not, expressing his dissatisfaction after his two-year winning streak in that event ended with a 12th-place finish.

“They wanted to slow down the fastest guy here so the rest of the field could keep up and they did,’’ Busch said after the July race.

Ryan Reed, who finished sixth at Indy, had a different viewpoint.

“I think anytime you make the cars … slower, they’re easier to drive,’’ he said. “When they’re easier to drive, you’re able to put them in more difficult positions and come out the other end OK and you’re going to have a little more confidence. I think you’ve got to find a balance because at this level a high-rate of speed is what help defines the sport.

“You don’t want us to go down and run 140 miles an hour and wide open every track, otherwise who wants to watch that? Just find a balance. I think that this may be a step in the right direction. It seems like the racing was better.’’

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NASCAR America: Danica Patrick reflects back on her racing career (video)

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Danica Patrick was the special guest in an hour-long appearance on Wednesday’s NASCAR America at the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

In one of the segments, Steve Letarte and Jeff Burton spoke with Patrick about her overall racing career, starting with go-karts at a young age, racing in Europe in her teens, her IndyCar years and of course her NASCAR career to date.

Here’s some excerpts of that segment and Patrick’s observations (watch the whole segment in the video above):

Making the transition from IndyCar to NASCAR: “It was a transition, that’s why I did Nationwide and two part-time years. I started slow and really enjoyed then made the full-time transition in the Nationwide Series in 2012 and then Cup in 2013.”

Big change from IndyCar to driving a NASCAR car: “Just driving it is fine.  If you can drive, you can drive.”

What really got her career going: “In the Formula Ford Festival (in England), there were over 100 entries, this is the series Jenson Button drove in. I finished second, which is the highest for an American and a female. I think it really got the attention of Bobby Rahal, who gave me a job when I came back to the U.S. a couple years later.”

The track she wanted to win the most at, either in IndyCar or NASCAR: “I always felt I would win at Indy. When I came to NASCAR, maybe it was because I didn’t clarify which car I would win in. I wouldn’t change anything. … I don’t ever look back at things and wish it was different. I believe everything happens for a reason.

Do she have any unfinished business? “Do I have unfinished business? I guess if you don’t accomplish your goal, there’s always some level of unfinished business no matter of who you are or what you do.”

What are her favorite and least favorite tracks: “Indy is special. Always has been, always will be. There’s an aura about it and I feel I know every inch about that place. If I had to pick a Cup track, I’d say it was Martinsville. Honestly, I hate Darlington. I just hate it. It is an exhausting race. It is four corners, next to the wall every corner, driving over the apron. It’s a tough track. I have not liked Darlington.”

Watch the full interview with Patrick in the video above.


Cup qualifying headed to Saturday on more consistent basis in future?

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After two consecutive weekends of Cup teams qualifying shortly before they raced, are fans likely to see more of that next year?

Cup teams qualified on Saturday after the Xfinity race last month at Indianapolis. Cup teams qualified a few hours before they raced the past two weekends at Pocono and Watkins Glen.

The experiment is part of NASCAR shortening the weekend schedule. NASCAR has added a fan fest to compensate for one less day of track activity for the Cup Series. That could become more common next year.

“I think the key for us is to really create some fun activities for the fans with more driver access on Fridays if we can,’’ Steve O’Donnell, NASCAR executive vice president and chief racing development officer, told SiriusXM NASCAR Radio on Monday.

“Tend to like the qualifying, if we’re going to move it, on Saturday. I think that is a really good experience for fans in terms of having that support race and being able to see the Monster Energy Series drivers qualify. So we’ll probably continue to look that way. The biggest thing for us is to creating those unique, fun fan experiences around the drivers and open up the access as much as we can.’’

Cup teams will qualify and race on the same day once more this year — at Martinsville in the playoffs. This weekend, Cup teams will qualify on Friday at Michigan and race on Sunday, the typical weekend schedule.

O’Donnell told “The Morning Drive” that there have been some questions raised by competitors about qualifying and racing on the same day.

“I think some of the feedback from some folks in the garage is that still is really tough to qualify, get ready for the race,’’ he said. “Folks like it, but I also think Saturday also gives you the opportunity maybe to plan a little bit more on race prep that you need for the car. It will be a balance as we look at both of those to see what is the best solution going forward for the teams.’’

Todd Gordon, crew chief for Joey Logano, told SiriusXM NASCAR Radio on Monday that he’s glad to go back to a schedule where qualifying and the race won’t be on the same day this weekend.

Gordon noted the “anxiety” in how much preparation has to be done to the backup car in case a driver crashes in qualifying.

“If you were to wreck in qualifying, you had two hours to get a car back together ready to race,’’ he said.

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